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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 8


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Docno: ADMS-06-08-02-0082

Author: Braintree, town of
Author: Thayer, Ebenezer Jr.
Date: 1779-08-10

John Adams' Credentials to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention

The Inhabitants of the Town of Braintree, being Legally Assembled on the Ninth day of August instant, pursuant to Legall Warrants, made choice of the Honble. John Adams Esqr. to Represent them in a State Convention, appointed to be convened and held at Cambridge on the first day of September next, for the purpose of Framing a New Constitution.1
[signed] Attest Ebenr. Thayer junr Town Cler[k]
MS (M-Ar: vol. 160, p. 190); docketed: “Braintree.”
1. This attestation of JA 's election to the forthcoming state constitutional convention is on the verso of the broadside of 15 June calling for the election of convention delegates from each of the towns entitled to representation in the General Court. Elected by freemen 21 years and over who were inhabitants of a town, the delegates could equal in number the representatives proportioned to each town according to a formula adopted in 1776 (Mass., Province Laws , 5:502–503).

Docno: ADMS-06-08-02-0083

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Lovell, James
Date: 1779-08-13

To James Lovell

[salute] My dear Sir

Since I have had Opportunity to converse, a little in this Country, and to read a few Gazettes, I find that Questions have been agitated here in the Newspapers, and in private Circles, as well as in Congress, concerning his Excellency the Comte De Vergennes and Mr. A. Lee which seem to make it necessary, that I should Send the inclosed Copies.1 You can judge better than I, whether it will be of any public Utility to lay them before Congress. My first Letter and his Excellencys Answer, I can see no Objection to laying before Congress: But as the rest contain little besides mutual Compliments, perhaps it will be as well to conceal them. I submit the whole, however, to your Discretion, and am with much Esteem, your Friend
[signed] John Adams
RC (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 85); docketed: “Aug. 13. 1779 Hon. J Adams to James Lovell recd. 30 answd. 31st. with a Correspondence between Mr. Adams and Count de Vergennes concerning Mr. Deane's Publication of Decr. 5th. 78, Mr. Arthur Lee's Character and Mr. Adams Conduct in France. read in Congress and laid on the Table by Mr. Lovell Sepr. 27th. 1779.”
1. JA 's letters to Vergennes of 11, 16, and 27 Feb., and Vergennes' replies of 13 and 21 Feb. (all above). JA also sent copies on this day to Samuel Adams, saying that he had “been asked a Thousand Questions which may all be answered by { 122 } the inclosed Copies” and telling Adams that he had transmitted copies to Lovell (NN: Bancroft Coll.). All the letters were laid on the table by Lovell the same day for inspection by the members, although the Journal for 27 Sept. makes no mention of the fact.