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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 9


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Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0079

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-04-03

To the President of Congress, No. 33

Paris, 3 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 387–394). printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:588–592.
John Adams began this letter, which was read in Congress on 10 July, by paraphrasing the first portion of William Lee's letter of 30 March (above), regarding the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and the Netherlands. He then provided English translations of a petition of 25 Feb. to the States General calling for the outfitting of fifty-two warships; Sir Joseph Yorke's memorial of 21 March demanding that the States General reply within three weeks to his previous memorials for support of Great Britain's war efforts, or face suspension of the Anglo-Dutch treaties insofar as they related to neutral commerce; the States General's reply of 24 March requesting additional time; and a paraphrase of Yorke's rejoinder that he was unable to satisfy that request.
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 387–394.) printed: (Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:588–592.)

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0080

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-04-04

To the President of Congress, No. 34

Paris, 4 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 405–408). printed: various American newspapers, including the Pennsylvania Gazette of 12 July and the Boston Independent Chronicle of 3 Aug. 1780.
In this letter, which was read in Congress on 10 July, John Adams paraphrased the resolutions praising Henry Grattan for his efforts on behalf of Ireland in the Irish Parliament adopted at a meeting of Dublin merchants on about 20 March. He then noted a proposal made in Dublin to raise funds for warships to give Irish shipping the protection which the British were neglecting to provide, and reported the speculation that this effort could lead to an Irish navy. Adams also included the texts of Grattan's reply of 24 March in which he vowed to continue his efforts to modify Poyning's Law; the reply of Luke Gardner, member of the Irish Parliament for Dublin, to his instructions in which he promised to work to modify Poyning's Law; and the reply of Edward Newenham, another member from Dublin, to the same effect. Adams ended by apologizing for “stating so particularly proceedings, which must have such momentous Consequences. These are foundations of another Revolution, and will effect a total Independence of Ireland on England. If England should resist these demands, and at the same Time continue the War with America and the House of Bourbon, Congress may have an Ambassador at the Court or Congress of Ireland, in a very short Time.”
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 405–408.) printed: (various American newspapers, including the Pennsylvania Gazette of 12 July and the Boston Independent Chronicle of 3 Aug. 1780.)

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0081

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-04-04

To the President of Congress, No. 35

Paris, 4 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 409–410). printed: various American newspapers, including the Pennsylvania Gazette of 12 July and the Boston Independent Chronicle of 3 Aug. 1780.
In this letter, which was read in Congress on 10 July, John Adams provided { 109 } the text of a resolution adopted by the City of London on 22 March concerning the maintenance of a correspondence with the various committees named by the counties, cities, and towns regarding the general association.
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, I, f. 409–410.) printed: (various American newspapers, including the Pennsylvania Gazette of 12 July and the Boston Independent Chronicle of 3 Aug. 1780.)