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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 9


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0143

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-04-29

To the President of Congress, No. 55

Paris, 29 April 1780. RC (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 3–5). LbC in John Thaxter's hand (Adams Papers); marked: “55.” printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:640–642.
In this letter, received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, { 254 } John Adams provided information that had appeared in London newspapers between 11 and 18 April. He included the names of the newly appointed commander and principal officers of the channel fleet and summarized reports from Portsmouth regarding mutinies by the crews of the Invincible and Resolution over pay. Both vessels were part of the Rear Adm. Thomas Graves' fleet that was intended to intercept the French fleet under Ternay (see Thomas Digges' letter of 14 April, and note 5, above). Adams quoted from resolutions opposing the war in America adopted on 14 April by a meeting of “the freeholders of the county of Surry” (see Edmund Jenings' letter of 24 April, and note 3, above). In a postscript, not printed by Wharton, Adams quoted from resolutions adopted by the County of Hertford on 17 April to the effect that the war in America, “by obliging Us to carry all our Forces to that Quarter puts us out of a Condition to resist with Vigour, As We might otherwise do, the united Efforts of France and Spain while the Said War produces no other Effect upon the Americans than to add to the Enmity, which has but too long subsisted between Us: an Enmity, of which We have felt, the fatal Effects, and which by putting an obstacle to our Union, threatens England, with a Ruin as compleat as it is inevitable.”
RC (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 3–5). LbC in John Thaxter's hand (Adams Papers); marked: “55.” printed: (Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:640–642.)

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0144

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-04-29

To the President of Congress, No. 56

Paris, 29 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 1–2). LbC (Adams Papers); marked: “56.” printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:640.
Congress received this letter on 16 October. Relying on newspaper accounts, John Adams reported on the number and size of the warships forming the fleets commanded by Como. Robert Walsingham and Rear Adm. Thomas Graves and their departure on 8 and 11 April respectively. He then estimated the strength of the British West Indian fleet if the vessels under Walsingham and Graves were joined with those commanded by Rodney and Vice Adm. Sir Hyde Parker, the British commander in the West Indies. Adams noted, however, that there were conflicting rumors about Graves' destination. Finally, he told of the return of the fleet under Walsingham, reportedly because a French fleet was in its path (see Edmé Jacques Genet's letter of 29 April, below).
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 1–2). LbC (Adams Papers); marked: “56.” printed: (Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:640.)

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0145-0001

Author: Genet, Edmé Jacques
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1780-04-29

From Edmé Jacques Genet

J'ai l honneur d'envoyer à Monsieur Adams une Notice Sûre des Flottes parties de Brest dans le tems où Walsingham a eu avis que l'Escadre francoise paroissoit a l'ouvert de la manche, et qu'une terreur panique l'a fait retourner à Plimouth, quoi qu'il eût le vent bon pour continuer Sa route. Il Seroit amusant de voir ces détails dans les papiers anglois, et qu'ils y fussent présentés comme bien autentiques.1
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