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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 9


Search for a response to this letter.

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0183

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Genet, Edmé Jacques
Date: 1780-05-11

To Edmé Jacques Genet

[salute] Dear Sir

I have just recieved your Card of the 10th.1 I agree with You that the Dean's propositions are too absurd to be noticed.
As to the History of my peregrinations in Spain,2 and I find it is true as far as it goes; altho' the half is not told, excepting in the following particulars. They have called the American Agent at Corunna, Mr. Laurens, whereas his Name is Mr. Lagoanere. They have called, the first Justice of the Grand Audience “the Rixent,” Whereas they should have called him the Regent. It is moreover said that the { 300 } Gentlemen dined frequently with the Vice Roy, which is not exactly true—they dined with him but once.
In every other punctilio, this Narration is true, and far from being exaggerated.
I had indeed, my dear Sir, as much Reason, to be pleased with the good Will and Affection of the Spaniards, as I had to be mortified, at the Inconvenience of travelling in their Country and the bad Accommodations upon the Roads.
This Relation shews the Benevolence of Spain on one hand, and the Gratitude of America on the other; and consequently the excellent disposition in both to maintain the new Connection: it has consequently a Tendency to put the English into a proper Temper of Repentance of their folly and their Crimes—a Temper to which they must be brought, before they will make Peace. For this Reason I wish to see it as public as possible and consecrated to Immortality in your Mercury.
LbC in John Thaxter's hand (Adams Papers).
1. Not printed, but see JA 's letters to Genet of 3 May, note 1, and 9 May, note 5, and Genet's letter of 9 May, note 1 (all above).
2. The critique is of the version printed in the General Advertiser of 1 May. For JA 's original account, see his letter of 19 April to Edmund Jenings, and note 2 (above). It is notable that Genet was apparently unaware that JA was the source of the account and that JA did not inform him of the fact in this letter. See Genet's letters of 9 May (above) and 10 May (Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0184

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Recipient: President of Congress
Date: 1780-05-11

To the President of Congress, No. 64

Paris, 11 May 1780. RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 43–45). printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:670–671.
In this letter, read in Congress on 20 Sept., John Adams sent the text of three motions respecting the American war proposed by David Hartley in a speech to the House of Commons on 1 May. For the speech and Hartley's motions, see Thomas Digges' letter of 2 May, and note 7 (above). Adams concluded his letter with a reference to Gen. Henry Seymour Conway's subsequent announcement that on 2 May he would lay before the House a bill to establish “the foundations of a Treaty of Peace and Reconciliation” with America.
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, No. 84, II, f. 43–45). printed: (Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. , 3:670–671.)

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0185-0001

Author: Genet, Edmé Jacques
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1780-05-11

From Edmé Jacques Genet

Nous serions bien fachés, Monsieur de ne pas avoir dimanche the young gentlemen. C'est un jour fait pour eux, puis qu'il y a une { 301 } cérémonie1 qui ne se repete pas souvent, et j'ai pris les précautions nécessaires pour qu'ils la voyent à leur aise. Nous les attendons et nous vous Supplions de ne point tromper notre attente. Le Commodore Jones nous fera sûrement lhoneur d'accepter le break fast chez nous. J'y aura de bon Thé qui n'a point été taxé par l'angleterre. Le commodore vous accompagnera à la chapelle pour voir la cérémonie et vous serés tous bien placés. J'espere bien que les young gentlemen viendront encore plus d'une fois, car il ne faut pas pretendre que tout se voit ici en un jour. Mais celui de dimanche is a Special one.
Je connois Sir J. Dalrymple; Et je puis vous assurer, qu'on ne Sera plus aussi complaisant ici pour lui qu'on l'a été dans d'autres tems. Ceux qui depuis lui ont demandé les mêmes faveurs n'y ont pas été bien reçues.
Vous êtes bien le maitre d'envoyer au Congrez les propositions du Doyen:2 Elles Sont tirées du general advertiser, which I reckon to be ministerialist
[signed] Genet