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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 9


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Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0293-0001

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Vergennes, Charles Gravier, Comte de
Date: 1780-07-01

To the Comte de Vergennes

[salute] Sir

I had this morning the honour of your letter of the Thirtieth of June.
It is very certain that the Representations from his Majesty, which may be made by his Minister the Chevalier De La Luzerne, will be attended to by Congress with all possible Respect, and its due weight will be given to every Fact and Argument that he may adduce, and I am well persuaded that Congress will be able to give such Reasons for their final Result, as will give entire Satisfaction to his Majesty, and remove every Colour of just Complaint from his Subjects.
As in my Letter of the Twenty second of the last Month, I urged such Reasons as appeared to me incontestible to shew that the Resolutions of Congress of the Eighteenth of March, connected with { 496 } the other Resolution to pay the Loan Office Certificates according to the value of Money at the time they were emitted, being a Determination to pay the full value of all the Bills and Certificates which were out, and the Depreciation of both, being more the Act and Fault of the Possessors than of Government; was neither a violation of Public Faith, nor an Act of Bankrupcy; I have the honor to agree with your Excellency in opinion, that any further Discussion of these Questions is unnecessary.
I have the honor to be with great Respect Your Excellency's Most obedient and most humble Servant
[signed] John Adams
RC in Francis Dana's hand (Arch. Aff. Etr., Paris, Corr. Pol., E.-U., vol. 13); endorsed: “Juillet 1er. Lettre de M. Adams Sur le nouveau Sisteme de finances etabli par le Congrès.”

Docno: ADMS-06-09-02-0294

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Vergennes, Charles Gravier, Comte de
Date: 1780-07-02

To the Comte de Vergennes

[salute] Sir

I have the honor to inclose a Boston News Paper of the first of May, containing an Account of the Arrival of the Marquiss de la Fayette; an Extract of a Letter from London; and another of a Letter from Dr. Benjamin Rush of Philadelphia, once a member of Congress, and a Gentleman of very good Intelligence.2 He speaks the French Language very well, was about ten Years ago in Paris, and a Correspondent of Dr. Dubourg.
This Letter was brought me by two young Gentlemen, Mr. Folcke and Mr. Fox, Natives of Philadelphia, Graduates in the University there, of Quaker Families, who are Students in medicine, and are come to Paris to complete their Education in the Faculty.3 They confirm Dr. Rush's Sentiments very fully.
Two other Gentlemen just arrived Mr. Trumble of Connecticut and Mr. Tyler of Boston confirm the same, in the Eastern States.
I have the honor to be, with the greatest Respect, Sir, your Excellency's most obedient and most humble Servant
[signed] John Adams
RC in John Thaxter's hand (Arch. Aff. Etr., Paris, Corr. Pol., E.-U., vol. 13); endorsed: “M. Adams” and “envoy de nouvelles recues de l'amerique Septentrionale.”
1. On or about this date JA went to Versailles to inform Vergennes that he planned to leave Paris and visit the Netherlands for a few weeks. Vergennes persuaded him to delay his { 497 } departure (to the president of Congress, 23 July, No. 99, below).
2. The newspaper was the Boston Gazette; the “Letter from London” was of 23 June from Thomas Digges, which Digges mentions in his letter of 29 June (above), but which has not been found; Benjamin Rush's letter was of 28 April (above).
3. For John Foulke, see Rush's letter of 28 April, and note 2 (above). George Fox, who did not become a physician, was a wealthy Philadelphia Quaker and friend of William Temple Franklin. When Temple Franklin died in 1823, he left the bulk of Benjamin Franklin's papers to Fox and it was through Fox's family that they were given to the American Philosophical Society and the University of Pennsylvania (Anne H. Cresson, “Biographical Sketch of Joseph Fox, Esq.,” PMHB , 32: 196–197 [April 1908]).