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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 10


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Docno: ADMS-06-10-02-0072

Author: Johonnot, Gabriel
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1780-09-08

From Gabriel Johonnot

[salute] Sir

I Received your letter by the Frigate Alliance bearing date the 23d. Feby. last,1 Inclosing an Account of my son's Expences, on his Journey from Ferrol in Spain to Paris, and feel myself not a little Affected, that you should Intimate the most distant Idea, of the Necessity of { 139 } a Voucher for your Account. I could wish to be held in that view with you Sir, that not only every Expence you may be at, should be cheerfully repaid, but that I feel a most Gratefull sense of your Attention to my Child, and shall not fail in every Instance in my power fully to Manifest it.
By the Briggantine Pallas which sailed from this Port in June last, on board which Vessell I fully Intended to Embark for Europe, but fortunately as Circumstances are was prevented, and consequently saved myself from falling into the Enemies hands, as she was captured soon after sailing, by her to the care of Mr: Warren,2 I wrote you and Enclosed a bill for 600 livres, but as that Gentleman still remains with the British Admiral Edwards, who has Invited him to go to Europe in his ship, and it will probably be a long time before he gets over to France, I have herein Enclosed a second bill of the same sett, for Six Hundred livres, and a first bill of Another sett, for three Hundred livres, which I presume will be sufficient untill I have the Honor of seeing you, which I promise myself will be very soon, as I understand the Hermione Frigate has Orders to be in Readiness to go to Europe on the Shortest Notice. I go to Newport in a day or two to Obtain a Passage in her. Should any thing either prevent my going in her or her not going I will Embrace the first Opportunity to remit.3
I have Inclosed the Papers for several Weeks Past which will Inform you of every Intelligence worthy Notice.
I am with the Highest Esteem & Respect Your Most Obedient Most Hble: Servt:
[signed] Gabl: Johonnot
1. For this letter ( LbC , Adams Papers), see JA 's letter to Samuel Cooper of 23 Feb., and note 1 (vol. 8:355–356).
2. For Winslow Warren's capture on the privateer Pallas, see Mercy Otis Warren's letter of 8 May, and note 2 (above).
3. No further letters from Gabriel Johonnot have been found, but he did not embark on the French frigate Hermione. Samuel Cooper's letter of 9 Feb. 1780 [i.e. 1781] states that Johonnot was about to sail on the Continental frigate Alliance (Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-06-10-02-0073

Author: Dana, Francis
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1780-09-09

From Francis Dana

[salute] Dear Sir

Just as I had finished the above1 yours of the 2d. came to hand. The packet mentioned by Mr. Bradford from Dr. Cooper to you, was a single letter, and has been receiv'd long since; it contains nothing of real consequence. I did not therefore forward it. I had your express { 140 } directions to open all letters to you, even Mrs. Adams's; her's however I shall not open, but deliver them to Mr. Thaxter. You will please to forward all you may receive for me without loss of time. You enclosed a blank sheet of paper instead of Mr. De Neufvilles Receipt. I have his acknowledgement of the payment in a letter at the same time. I have not yet seen Genl. Washington's or Genl. Green's letter which you mention—A check only, not a proper defeat depend upon it. Things look better than my fears, Congress have appointed Gates to the Southern Army. No brilliant stroke this Campaign without naval reinforcements. 'Tis wispered they will go from the West Indies. I wish they may—I am rejoiced exceedingly to hear of the acceptance of our Constitution. It's rise, progress, and final Establishment, exhibit a strange but glorious phenomenon in the political Hemisphere. I venerate the good sense and the public virtue which have brôt forth this great work.
Mr. Allen has come to Paris, he desires his respects to you Mr. Thaxter his most sincere regards.
Yours as above
[signed] FRA DANA
1. Presumably Dana means his letter of 8 Sept. (above), which immediately precedes this letter in his Letterbook (MHi: Francis Dana Letterbook).