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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0009-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-09-01

Tuesday September 1st.

Morning to town but rather late, having to copy and prepare a number of letters for my Father, and making also some final arrangements before leaving. At the Office, found a Woman there about that business of Farmer’s which is disgusting and disgraceful and the less I see of it the better. Though he is a troublesome and dangerous animal. I wait only for the passage of time. I was then engaged in performing all my other little duties previous to my Marriage. Renewed a policy of Insurance upon the Tenements in Common or Tremont Street for my father and obtained some necessary articles of dress. Drew Accounts due from the Tenants particularly from my very good friend Mrs. Longhurst. Another quarter. She notifies me she will send soon. Thus passed the morning.
In the afternoon I went to the House and filled my last book case. There is much left, which I know not what to do with. And my room is full already. So that I must sell or send them to Quincy. I incline to the opinion I shall try the first and what I cannot sell, I shall send. { 431 } It was a great Parade day, and many people were upon the Common, and the Cannon were noisy.1 I became exceedingly fatigued for it was late before I had finished. This being the last day upon which I shall attempt to exert myself. My books must hereafter be all of them rearranged. For I have at this time followed no method. Enough for the present. I am sick and tired of the Job. I then rode to Medford. Found Abby as usual but I was so tired that I could not exert myself to be lively at all. This made her dull, and we had so stupid an evening, that I concluded it was best to put an end to it early so I retired to bed at a little past nine.
1. The governor reviewed the light infantry, artillery, and cavalry companies of the first division of the Massachusetts militia on the Common. There followed a “sumptuous collation” and a “sham action” (Boston Daily Advertiser, 2 Sept. 1829; Columbian Centinel, 5 Sept. 1829).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/