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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-21

Friday 21st.

Morning passed in doing little or nothing. John and I took a stroll up Broadway, very far up, to look into a New York imitation of Tattersal’s in London. John has a fondness for Carriages and Horses which I do not partake in. I drive horses to get from place to place and I prefer a fast horse to a slow one, but I have no great pride in the business. Nor should I feel distressed if I never had further connection with them. On our return we called in at Mr. Stout’s, the Engraver’s,1 and I ordered a Card for Abby as Mrs. C. F. Adams anticipating a little and not without a silent qualm, but I got over this weakness, for these presentiments are always follies and only the more so when accident makes them sometimes turn out true. Afternoon, took a lounge into the Arcade and made a purchase of a little dress to make a present to the Baby. I have never as yet given her anything. This was a trifling present but even that more than my present exhausted means will allow.
Conversation with my Mother who seemed very dull and out of spirits, about George and his affairs. I tried to direct attention from the subject as much as possible, talking mildly and favourably. But she seemed constantly recurring to it. John and his Wife stayed out long so that we did not drink tea until very late after which my Mother again conversed with me, but not upon George. She principally talked of Johnson Hellen’s affairs, his marriage and treatment of the family, which affected her but not too much. She then talked of my marriage, which seemed to give her some pleasure. Thus the time passed until we separated at ten o’clock and I retired to bed. It was so evident to { 423 } me that my Mother could not go in the Franklin, that I did not even mention it, and suffered the day to pass without taking any notice of our departure.
1. James D. Stout, the engraver, at 153 and 172 Broadway (Longworth’s N.Y. Directory, 1828–1829).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/