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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-03-01-02-0007-0009-0010

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1785-07-18

18th.

At about 9 in the morning, I went on shore with my trunks, which were search'd, so that I almost thought myself in Europe again. I went to Cape's, and after I had put all in order, went immediately to Mr. Jay, N: 8. Broadway. I then went to his office, which is at the corner of Dock Street, and found him there. I deliver'd to him all the Letters I had for him, and remain'd with him half an hour. I then return'd and visited Mr. van Berkel the Dutch Minister. Dined with Mr. Jay and after dinner, went immediately, to see Mr. Gerry (N: 61. King Street). Spent some time with him, and then went with him and Mr. King,1 and was introduced to the president of Congress,2 to Mr. Hardy,3 and Mr. Monroe of the Virginia delegation and to several other gentlemen. I went to governor Clinton's,4 but he was not within. We walk'd round the rampart, and waited upon Mr. Gardoqui5 the spanish chargé des affaires. He was not at home. We met Mr. Ellery and Mr. Howell of the Rhode Island delegation,6 and Mr. McHenry7 of the Maryland. Spent part of the Evening with Mr. Osgood,8 and return'd to my lodging at about 9 o'clock.
1. Elbridge Gerry and Rufus King were Massachusetts delegates to the congress, 1776–1781 and 1782–1785, and 1784–1787, respectively (Biog. Dir. Cong.).
2. Richard Henry Lee, Virginia delegate 1774–1780, 1784–1787, and president from Nov. 1784 for one year (same; JCC, 27:649).
3. Samuel Hardy, Virginia member of the congress 1783–1785 (Biog. Dir. Cong.).
4. George Clinton, governor of New York, 1777–1795 (same).
5. Diego de Gardoqui, the Spanish chargé d'affaires, 1785–1789, the son of Joseph de Gardoqui of Bilbao, whom JA and JQA visited in Jan. 1780 and whose firm, Gardoqui & Sons, was the chief conduit of military stores to America for the Spanish court during the Revolution (Repertorium der diplomatischen Vertreter aller Länder, p. 445; Samuel Flagg Bemis, Pinckney's Treaty: A Study of America's Advantage from Europe's Distress, 1783–1800, Baltimore, 1926, p. 71–73).
6. William Ellery and David Howell, delegates 1776–1781 and 1783–1785, and 1782–1785, respectively (Biog. Dir. Cong.).
7. James McHenry, member 1783–1786, and later secretary of war, 1796–1800 (same).
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8. Samuel Osgood, Massachusetts delegate, 1780–1784, had been elected commissioner of the United States Treasury by the congress earlier in the year and lived in New York (same; Sibley-Shipton, Harvard Graduates, 17:412–419).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/