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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 6


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Docno: ADMS-06-06-02-0141

Author: Genet, Edmé Jacques
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1778-06-08

From Edmé Jacques Genet

[salute] Honour'd Sir

The News papers you So kindly transmit me will be carefully perus'd and will afford, I dare say, many interesting articles to my publication which has no other aim than paying to your Country the justice that is due to enlighten'd courage. I had noted in the remembrancer the letters you mention the 1st. of which begins with these words You have no doubt.1 To be Sure { 193 } they'll please excessively my readers being So prophetical, and impress'd with genuine love for your former metropolis. The other papers giving an account of the origin of war I had also destin'd to publication. I am very oblig'd to you Sir, for the Kind leave you grant me of giving them to light with your Sanction: and I won't fail to lay them all under your Eyes when ready for the press.
I am Sorry you was at the trouble to send me a messenger on purpose. For the future, any parcel you may have occasion to transmit me, may be Sent to the post office, as I pay no postage.

[salute] I am with the truest respect Hond. Sir Your most humble and obedient Servant

[signed] Genet
RC (Adams Papers); quotation footnoted by CFA on the first page: “for 1777. p 203” (see note 1, below).
1. Genet gives here the opening words of the first of two letters “To a Friend in London” mentioned by JA. CFA, not having access to JA's letter of [ante 8 June] and thus being unaware that JA had written the two letters “To a Friend in London,” apparently searched the Remembrancer and concluded that Genet was referring to a letter on p. 203 of the volume for 1777 entitled “Copy of a letter from an English Gentleman at Paris, dated July 28, 1777.” That letter, beginning with the words “You will, no doubt, have heard,” was largely devoted to an account of the activities of the privateer General Mifflin and its exchange of salutes at Brest.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/