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Browsing: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 2


This note contained in document ADMS-04-02-02-0018
3. This must have been a copy of the broadside printed by John Dunlap—the first published text—of the Declaration of Independence, which was issued this day in accordance with Congress' vote of 4 July, and a copy of which is wafered to the “Rough Journal” of Congress as an official text. “You are still impatient for a Declaration of Independency,” JA wrote Joseph Ward on this same day. “I hope your Appetite will now be satisfyed. Such a Declaration passed Congress Yesterday, and this Morning will be printed” (LbC, Adams Papers). (The Declaration was not printed in a newspaper until 6 July; see JA's 1st letter to AA of 7 July, below.) See Michael J. Walsh, “Contemporary Broadside Editions of the Declaration of Independence,” Harvard Libr. Bull., 3:31–43 (Winter 1949), which includes a facsimile of the Dunlap broadside and a census of the fourteen copies known to survive; also Julian P. Boyd, The Declaration of Independence: The Evolution of the Text, Washington, 1943, p. 8, 35, and pl. 10.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/