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Browsing: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 5


This note contained in document ADMS-04-05-02-0019
3. See Cotton Tufts to JA, 10 Oct., note 12, above. James Warren had rejected or resigned from one public responsibility after another—paymaster general of the Continental Army and justice of the superior court in Massachusetts, both in 1776, major general of the state militia in 1777, member of Congress in 1779, lieutenant governor in 1780, and member of the Continental Navy Board in May 1782. One reason for Warren's increasing alienation from public service, beginning in the late 1770s, was his growing hostility to John Hancock, the dominant figure in Massachusetts politics. But Warren's distaste for holding office seems to have had its origins in a complex personality that is still not well understood. See vol. 3:208; vol. 4:16, 20; JA, Papers, 4:14, 408; 5:269–272; 6:188–189; 7:111–114, 141–142, 144; 8:93;DAB; Sibley's Harvard Graduates, 11:590–600.
CFA omitted this paragraph from AA, Letters, 1840, and from JA-AA, Familiar Letters.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/