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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 1


This note contained in document ADMS-13-01-02-0003-0007-0017
3. The sectional rivalry at Harvard which embittered club affairs (see entry for 13 June, and note, above) also affected class politics. The juniors were now electing a captain for one of the companies of the celebrated Harvard Washington Corps. This marching society, organized in 1811 and remodeled in 1822, consisted of four companies, totaling one hundred and twenty men. At its head was a lieutenant colonel. Its grand function was to parade in uniform on the afternoon of Exhibition days (see entry for 29 June, below).
To keep down expenses and to tighten college discipline, a faculty committee, consisting of Professors Otis and Channing, had been appointed on 29 April to consider the future of the military order. On 10 May they recommended that the group be continued, but that in the future it should not hold an encampment, should not be allowed more than six musicians, including fife and drum, and should not be served refreshments after Exhibition day parades. The proposed rules were very distasteful to members of the corps, who enjoyed martial music as well as the traditional gay dinner which capped their public performances. Nevertheless, the faculty approved the new rules on 21 June, with the concession (made, perhaps, as a result of the petition CFA mentioned) that ten musicians, drum and fife included, were to be allowed on great occasions. See Records of the College Faculty, 10:65, 66, 69, Harvard Archives; Batchelder, Bits of Harvard History, p. 65 ff., for a full history of the corps; Morison, Three Centuries of Harvard, p. 214–215.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/