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Browsing: Legal Papers of John Adams, Volume 2


This note contained in document ADMS-05-02-02-0009-0001-0003
23. Bourne to Doane, London, 12 Oct. 1776, DNA Microcopy 162, Case 30, No. 29:
“My situation here is very unhappy as you may well think being seperated from my Family and friends; But it is neither in my power to change it nor in the least degree prudent to attempt it this winter without exposing my person and leaving your property unguarded. Therefore [I] must for the present remain here until I can return with more Safety to myself and friends.”
After reporting that his presence in England was working to Doane's great advantage, Bourne concluded,
“I am determined to make one Effort ere belong to see you and all friends when I find the gathering of the Storm to abate. When the Brigantine returns [from Gibraltar] I may sell her but that depends on Circumstances and price. Be assured that I have nothing more at heart than the welfare and interest of my friends and if it be in my power to add to their happiness and Interest I shall ever be ready to do it, tho' at the expence of my own small private fortune.”
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/