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Browsing: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 7


Docno: ADMS-04-07-02-0180

Author: Adams, Abigail
Recipient: Tufts, Cotton
Date: 1787-01-24

Abigail Adams to Cotton Tufts

[salute] Dear sir

I designd to have written you a much Longer Letter than I shall now be able to. The State of politicks in our Country is such as to give pain to every Friend and well wisher of it. I hope the pamphlet mr Adams has lately written and which captain Cushing carries out, will have a benificial influence if it comes not too Late. I inclose to you a ministerial publication which has past through four Editions in about ten days.1 What he says with respect to the Kings popularity in the English Nation is at this present time stricktly true. His Characters are drawn with freedom, his intention is however to wash Some Etheops White.
This day col Franks arrived here with the Emperor of Morocos Treaty and will sail in the next packet for New York with it.2
Mr Adams has directed me to request you upon the receit of this Letter to purchase two hundred Guineys worth of congress Paper. We are told that it is sold at 2 and 6 pence pr pound. Do not be affraid, as the little he has is in publick Securities, it is as safe in one kind as an other, and if one sinks all must Sink, which God forbid. We are told here that the Name of the person must be enterd upon the Treasury Books, or the Name of a Friend, but you doubtless know the method. Our credit is not yet so low, but what Foreigners are eagerly tho Secretly buying up this paper. You will draw upon mr Adams for the Money—it will never be at a lower ebb than at present unless actual war takes place. You will find an account forwarded in mr Adams letter.3 Scot is arrived but none of our Letters { 455 } are yet come up. Inclosed is a letter from mrs Smith. It was only two small red coverd Manuscrip Books which the Gentleman had and not pocket Books. Will that House be to be sold do you imagine which he owns?4

[salute] Regards to all inquiring Friends from Dear Sir your ever affectionate Neice

[signed] A Adams
RC (Adams Papers); addressed by WSS: “The Honorable Cotton Tufts Esquire Boston”; endorsed: “Mrs. Ab. Adams rcd April 19. 1787.”
1. Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall, A Short Review of the Political State of Great-Britain, at the Commencement of the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-seven, London, 1787. Wraxall (1751–1831), a member of Parliament, published the pamphlet anonymously. In the first few weeks of publication, it went through six editions and sold roughly 17,000 copies in England (DNB).
2. The Treaty of Peace and Friendship negotiated by Thomas Barclay for the United States and signed by the emperor of Morocco in June and July 1786. The English translations were signed and sealed by Jefferson in Paris on 1 Jan. 1787 and by JA in London on 25 Jan. (Miller, Treaties, 2:185–227).
3. Probably JA to Cotton Tufts, 15 Jan. (Adams Papers), but the account has not been found.
4. For an extended discussion of the Vassall-Borland House (Adams Old House) and Royall Tyler's aborted purchase of it, see vol. 3:264–266.

Docno: ADMS-04-07-02-0181

Author: Adams, Abigail
Recipient: Jefferson, Thomas
Date: 1787-01-29

Abigail Adams to Thomas Jefferson

[salute] My dear sir

I received by Col Franks Your obliging favour1 and am very sorry to find your wrist Still continues lame. I have known very Salutary effects produced by the use of British oil upon a spraind joint. I have Sent a Servant to See if I can procure some. You may rest assured that if it does no good: it will not do any injury.
With regard to the Tumults in my Native state which you inquire about, I wish I could say that report had exagerated them. It is too true Sir that they have been carried to so allarming a Height as to stop the Courts of Justice in several Counties. Ignorant, wrestless desperadoes, without conscience or principals, have led a deluded multitude to follow their standard, under pretence of grievences which have no existance but in their immaginations. Some of them were crying out for a paper currency, some for an equal distribution of property, some were for annihilating all debts, others complaning that the Senate was a useless Branch of Government, that the Court of common Pleas was unnecessary, and that the Sitting of the General Court in Boston was a grieveince. By this list you will see, the materials which compose this Rebellion, and the necessity there is of the wisest and most vigorous measures to quell and suppress it. { 456 } Instead of that laudible Spirit which you approve, which makes a people watchfull over their Liberties and alert in the defence of them, these Mobish insurgents are for sapping the foundation, and distroying the whole fabrick at once. But as these people make only a small part of the State, when compared to the more Sensible and judicious, and altho they create a just allarm, and give much trouble and uneasiness, I cannot help flattering myself that they will prove Sallutary to the state at large, by leading to an investigation of the causes which have produced these commotions. Luxery and extravagance both in furniture and dress had pervaded all orders of our Countrymen and women, and was hastning fast to Sap their independance by involving every class of citizens in distress, and accumulating debts upon them which they were unable to discharge. Vanity was becoming a more powerfull principal than Patriotism. The lower order of the community were prest for taxes, and tho possest of landed property they were unable to answer the Demand. Whilst those who possesst Money were fearfull of lending, least the mad cry of the Mob2 should force the Legislature upon a measure very different from the touch of Midas.
By the papers I send you, you will see the benificial effects already produced, an act of the Legislature laying duties of 15 pr cent upon many articles of British manufacture and totally prohibiting others.3 A Number of Vollunteers Lawyers Physicians and Merchants from Boston made up a party of Light horse commanded by col Hitchbourn Leit col Jackson and Higgonson, and went out in persuit of the insurgents and were fortunate enough to take 3 of their Principal Leaders, Shattucks Parker and Page. Shattucks defended himself and was wounded in his knee with a broadsword. He is in Jail in Boston and will no doubt be made an example of.4
Your request my dear sir with respect to your daughter shall be punctually attended to, and you may be assured of every attention in my power towards her.
You will be so kind as to present my Love to Miss Jefferson, compliments to the Marquiss and his Lady. I am really conscience Smitten that I have never written to that amiable Lady, whose politeness and attention to me deserved my acknowledgment.
The little balance which you Stated in a former Letter in my favour,5 when an opportunity offers I should like to have in Black Lace at about 8 or 9 Livres pr Ell. Tho late in the Month, I hope it will not be thought out of season to offer my best wishes for the Health Long Life and prosperity of yourself and family, or { 457 } to assure you of the Sincere Esteem and Friendship with which I am Yours &c &c
[signed] A Adams
RC (DLC: Jefferson Papers); addressed by Col. David S. FrankFranks: “His Excellency Thomas Jefferson Paris”; endorsed: “Mrs. Adams.” Dft (Adams Papers).
1. Probably Jefferson to AA, 21 Dec. 1786, above. Jefferson also wrote to AA on 7 Jan., but that letter has not been found (Jefferson, Papers, 11:24).
2. The Dft has “the cry of the people” in place of “the mad cry of the Mob.”
3. In the Dft, the paragraph begins, “The disturbances which have taken place have roused from their Leathargy the Supine and the Indolent animated the Brave and taught wisdom to our Rulers.” On 17 Nov. 1786, the Massachusetts legislature passed “An Act to Raise a Public Revenue by Impost,” which placed impost taxes ranging from 1 to 15 percent on various goods and prohibited outright the importation of others (Mass., Acts and Laws, Acts of 1786, Sept. sess., ch. 48). The paper was probably the Boston Independent Chronicle, 30 Nov., which reported this information.
4. The Dft arranges the first three sentences found in the RC paragraph somewhat differently and identifies Lt. Col. (Jonathan) Jackson as a man Jefferson had met in France and Lt. Col. (Stephen) Higginson as a former member of Congress before closing with the sentence: “It is not unlikly that some examples must be made before the riots will be totally quelled and peace and good orderd restored.”
5. Probably Jefferson to AA, 9 Aug. 1786, above, showing a balance of £6.11.11 1/2 due to AA.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/