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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0005-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-05-30

Friday. 30th.

Morning at the Office. Finished Blackstone’s Commentaries which I have read carefully over and it has taken me five months. I do not { 242 } feel as if I was master of it all either, though this is the third reading I have given to it. Conversation with George. Report concerning Russell Jarvis sent me by John. Reflections upon Mr. Stetson’s testimony.1 Afternoon passed in reading and in copying Executive Record. The weather damp and rainy with thunder so that I did not walk. Evening finished Cicero’s Oration for Quintius.
1. See entry for 21 April, and note, above. Caleb Stetson, to whom JA2 had addressed his hostile remarks about Russell Jarvis, testified that on the next day he had asked a friend “to state to Mr. Jarvis that I had no personal concern in that conversation with Mr. Adams.” At the same time he rather weakly disavowed having expressed his “disapprobation of Mr. Adams’ conduct” (Report on the Assault by Russell Jarvis, House Report No. 260, 20 Cong., 1 sess., p. 29).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0005-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-05-31

Saturday. 31st.

Letter to my mother after which went to the Office but not to do much. Heard that Mr. Emerson had been taken alarmingly ill at Concord on Monday last. I have always thought he would not live very long although he may survive this.1 Rainy and disagreeable all day. Afternoon at home copying Executive Record and then went to Medford with Chardon Brooks. It poured the whole way. Found the family at M. much as usual. Had some conversation with Abby of rather a serious nature and reflected much upon her observations.
1. Violently deranged, Edward Bliss Emerson had to be taken to the asylum in Charlestown. He soon recovered his sanity, but his physical health, undermined by tuberculosis, was permanently broken (Ralph L. Rusk, The Life of Ralph Waldo Emerson, N.Y., 1949, p. 127).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0006-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-06-01

Sunday. June 1st.

Weather cloudy, cold and disagreeable. Did not go to Meeting at all today. Morning occupied in gathering information with regard to trees and the afternoon in conversation with Susan Brooks. In the evening, a good deal of Medford Company and as Mr. Brooks and Chardon had gone over to see Mr. Everett who had returned, I was obliged to entertain them, which to me is a bore. When they did get back, Mr. B. brought me a letter and a box from my Mother containing a purse and a pair of little candle sticks for tapers. The letter had not much news.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0006-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-06-02

Monday. June 2nd.

Returned to Boston this morning with Chardon Brooks. This day was a repetition of last Wednesday, being what is here called Artillery Election. Owing to this I had no way of passing the morning to my { 243 } satisfaction but at last settled down in reading Mr. Brougham’s Speech upon the State of English Law.1 Afternoon. Executive Record and one of Mr. Burke’s Speeches upon American Affairs. Walk with Mr. Derby and evening, Cicero until I fell asleep and found my study useless, when I retired.
1. CFA’s copy of Henry Brougham’s Present State of the Law, Phila., 1828, is in the Boston Athenaeum.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/