A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
close
-
The Adams Papers Digital Edition is undergoing active maintenance while we work on improvements to the system. You may experience slow performance or the inability to access content. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. We will endeavor to return to full capabilities as soon as possible.

Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0010-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-10-26

Sunday 26th.

The weather very warm and sultry today. Went to St. John’s this morning and heard Mr. Hawley preach a Sermon. I admire the Episcopal service. If I consulted my own feelings, I would always attend the Church of that sect. It is the only one in which my feelings of devotion are excited. One feels less the want of merit in a Preacher because you feel yourself capable of partaking equally in the services. This cannot be where you must trust a man to pray for you. He may not and probably will not draw your attention. In the afternoon, I wrote and sent a letter to Mr. Brooks on the subject of my marriage.1 It is gratifying to think the thing off my mind. The result will soon come, and all I can trust to is the purity of my motives. I have done my duty as far as I can.
1. CFA’s letter was an argument against further extending his engagement. Recognizing that the combined allowances promised by JQA and by P. C. Brooks would “barely suffice to support us,” CFA stiffly reminded his prospective father-in-law that his financial prospects were not likely to improve in the immediate future, for it would be years before he earned his living at { 300 } the bar. An objection to CFA on this ground, therefore, would be “equally good for ten years as for a day.” “If it prevails,” CFA warned, “I have already frankly told Abby that our engagement must cease” (CFA to P. C. Brooks, 26 Oct. 1828, LbC, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0010-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-10-27

Monday 27th.

Morning passed at home. Little or nothing material occurring. I received a letter this morning from Mr. Brooks most unexpectedly, but it contained little of interest. It made me for a moment regret my having sent this letter yesterday, but on reflection, it seems to me lucky as I should perhaps have been a little diverted from my original purpose. Now, the die is cast. I read some of Burke, played Billiards with Thomas, and went down to Mr. Frye’s with Thomas and John to dine. We had a pleasant time and spent the evening playing Whist.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0010-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-10-28

Tuesday. 28th.

Morning at home, reading and wasting it, with the exception of a visit or two with Thomas at Mr. Huygens’ and in return to the young Mr. Rush’s.1 The weather was fine but windy. On my return I was disappointed by not receiving my usual letter from Abby. This and some little feeling of sickness contributed to make me dull the remainder of the day. My spirits are barely kept from sinking here by considerable exertion. The evening was passed at home in the usual manner without any occurrence of interest.
1. Presumably Benjamin Rush (1811–1877), the son of Richard Rush, who was attending Princeton. See Letters of Benjamin Rush, ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951, 2:1081.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0010-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-10-29

Wednesday. October 29th.

Morning beautiful. Remained at home writing and answering a letter from Abby which reached me this morning instead of yesterday occasioned by a delay in the Post. I rode afterwards to the Norfolk Steam Boat to see Thomas off to his destination at Old Point. The day was as fine as any of the most beautiful we have in this finest season of the year. On my return I finished my letter to Abi and passed the evening as usual, quietly at home.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0010-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-10-30

Thursday. 30th.

Pleasant morning. I finished the collection of Vaughan papers this morning, and have not found so much information in them as I expected. They are very prolix. After luncheon I walked to the Capitol { 301 } to examine the figures lately finished in the Tympanum of the Building. The effect of them struck me very much, and on the whole, I have the impression that the front is as beautiful a specimen of modern architecture as any in the world. The figures are large, and seem remarkably well finished, particularly the figure of Justice and the Eagle which I particularly admired. On my walk I met Horace Dawes, an old friend of mine but one whom changes of circumstances and difference of situation have separated me from for many years and will continue to do so. But I am his well-wisher still. Evening quietly at home. Col. Trumbull called and sat an hour.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/