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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-07

Friday 7th.

Morning pleasant when we were called up to go on board of the Steam Boat to New York. I had not enjoyed a very good night’s rest but found myself in sufficiently good order to continue without complaint. The prevailing topic of conversation as we approach the City is the election and I was witness to a rather ludicrous scene in the Cabin where our Captain was haranguing for the administration. We arrived before ten and finding that I could go no further today, I was content to put up for twenty four hours at the City Hotel. This time I improved by calling upon Mrs. De Wint who made me visit a Mrs. Willett, a bride, because she did not know what to do with me. I felt awkwardly but it could not be helped. I then dined with Sidney Brooks and his wife, and Chardon. Abby had gone, though quite sick, on Wednesday, and the accounts here made me anxious to hasten. Our dinner was pleasant. I then walked with Sidney to the Store, spent a short time with him and finished the evening at the Bowery Theatre. My purpose was to see Madame Vestris1 dance, for which purpose I was compelled to drag through a very ranting performance of Richard the third. I used to like Booth.2 But either he or my taste { [fol. 304] } { [fol. 304] } { [fol. 304] } { [fol. 304] } { 305 } has altered. It is long since I felt so thoroughly fatigued as I did this evening.
1. Maria Ronzi Vestris and her husband, Charles Ronzi Vestris, French dancers, made their New York debut in August 1828 (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 367).
2. Junius Brutus Booth (1796–1852), the English actor, was famous for his portrayal of Richard III.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-08

Saturday 8th.

I found nothing but Clouds and rain upon my awaking this morning and had many fears that I should be detained in New York. But the weather became clear gradually and our prospect before Noon was fair. I wasted the morning for want of something to do, and killed half an hour at Blunt’s Office hearing the political News. One district in New England has gone for Jackson and that has produced a very great sensation.1 The party are encouraged by the returns from New York but I confess I have litle or no confidence in the result. I called at Sidney Brooks’ house to take leave of his wife, and after a hurried dinner, went on board the Steam Boat Washington for Providence. Found Chardon Brooks on board with a lady in charge. We had a pretty fair run during the afternoon, and evening.
1. Jackson carried one district in Maine; JQA received all fifty of the other New England electoral votes (Edward Stanwood, A History of the Presidency from 1788 to 1897, Boston, 1926, 1:149).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-09

Sunday 9th.

I slept better than usual in a birth, during the night, and found myself in the morning off Newport. Our passage was a tolerable one. We arrived at a quarter past ten o’clock and started directly for Boston in the Mail Stage. Our trip was quite rapid and pleasant. Indeed I never remember being better suited. Perhaps my object to be gained was agreeable for my arrival in Boston at three in exactly twenty four hours unexpectedly allowed me time enough to go to Medford this afternoon. I did and found Abby had only arrived in the morning. Instead of finding her sick, she was looking extremely well, and I have never had purer moments of unmingled pleasure than the few hours which passed this evening. Fleet as the wind happiness passes, gloom remains like a calm. My hours may be few, my futurity may be dismal, but it cannot take away from me the memory, while I live, of the day before I left and the evening I again saw my dearest Abby.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-10

Monday. 10th.

Moments of happiness will pass and if I have already passed the { 306 } most exquisite minutes of my life, it is no more than the fate of every man. I returned to Boston this morning and immediately went to George’s Office. I found him and passed the morning in conversation with him upon general politics and particular family affairs. He had been to perform my requests, hearing that I was in town. He had engaged a room for me at Mrs. Tarbell’s and had made arrangements respecting an Office.1 He had also purchased for me a certificate for three shares in the Fire and Marine Insurance Company for which he paid fifty one dollars for fifty making one hundred and fifty three dollars, and thirty seven cents for Commission. This leaves a balance which he passed to me. I then drew the Dividend upon the Stock which was purchased some time ago and deposited the whole in the Branch Bank. I am on the whole very well content with this distribution. I dined with George at Dr. Welsh’s. Nothing new there, after which I went to see Mrs. Tarbell and agreed upon taking possession there tomorrow.2 This occupied much of the afternoon, the rest was passed in giving current to that flow of conversation which usually happens between brothers after they have been apart for some time. I passed the evening at the Theatre and saw Wallack3 in the part of Macbeth. It was not an effective performance. I then returned to the Exchange where I passed the night.
1. CFA’s office, at 10 Court Street, was “a pleasant but very little room not more than twelve feet by ten” for which he paid seventy-five dollars a year (CFA to LCA, 15 Nov. 1828 and 10 Jan. 1829, Adams Papers).
2. Mrs. Thomas Tarbell, wife of an importer of European and Indian goods, lived at 11 Avon Place (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
3. James William Wallack (1794–1864), an English actor (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 372).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/