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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-10

Monday. 10th.

Moments of happiness will pass and if I have already passed the { 306 } most exquisite minutes of my life, it is no more than the fate of every man. I returned to Boston this morning and immediately went to George’s Office. I found him and passed the morning in conversation with him upon general politics and particular family affairs. He had been to perform my requests, hearing that I was in town. He had engaged a room for me at Mrs. Tarbell’s and had made arrangements respecting an Office.1 He had also purchased for me a certificate for three shares in the Fire and Marine Insurance Company for which he paid fifty one dollars for fifty making one hundred and fifty three dollars, and thirty seven cents for Commission. This leaves a balance which he passed to me. I then drew the Dividend upon the Stock which was purchased some time ago and deposited the whole in the Branch Bank. I am on the whole very well content with this distribution. I dined with George at Dr. Welsh’s. Nothing new there, after which I went to see Mrs. Tarbell and agreed upon taking possession there tomorrow.2 This occupied much of the afternoon, the rest was passed in giving current to that flow of conversation which usually happens between brothers after they have been apart for some time. I passed the evening at the Theatre and saw Wallack3 in the part of Macbeth. It was not an effective performance. I then returned to the Exchange where I passed the night.
1. CFA’s office, at 10 Court Street, was “a pleasant but very little room not more than twelve feet by ten” for which he paid seventy-five dollars a year (CFA to LCA, 15 Nov. 1828 and 10 Jan. 1829, Adams Papers).
2. Mrs. Thomas Tarbell, wife of an importer of European and Indian goods, lived at 11 Avon Place (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
3. James William Wallack (1794–1864), an English actor (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 372).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-11

Tuesday 11th.

Arose early and went to the Office. Finding myself now in possession of one I immediately set to making arrangements for it’s occupation. I went to Mrs. Wilson’s and transferred my Furniture from my old room with a joyful heart. For my time there was not among the pleasantest recollections of my life. I placed most of it in my Office as I do not propose to make my room at Mrs. Tarbell’s a sitting room, either on the ground of economy or health. I dined at a Restorateur as I wished to cut my connection with the Exchange as soon as possible; passed the afternoon at George’s Office and the evening. Took possession of my room at Mrs. Tarbell’s this evening.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0004-0011-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1828-11-12

Wednesday. 12th.

Morning extremely rainy, wet and uncomfortable. I remained at { 307 } home until ten o’clock waiting for George, who promised to come and take me to Quincy. He arrived at last and we started in the midst of a disagreeable storm. Our ride was about as unpleasant as it possibly could be. The object I had in view was to attend the dedication of the New Church in Quincy, to plant the acorns my father gave to my charge, and to obtain the things which I had left in my Summer’s residence here. The day cleared off bitterly cold before the services were finished. They were not at all of an impressive character to my mind, but I differ so much from others in these feelings that my tastes are to me troubles.1
My Uncle Adams had a dinner provided for many and it was as uncomfortable as they usually are. Unfortunately for me my ideas of this place are never associated with comfort or pleasure. And inasmuch as the News of today2 confirms us in the belief that it must shortly become the residence of my father, these reflections are hardly of an agreeable character. On the whole, however, I feel grateful that this information should have been delayed until the defeat gives me no great trial. The very evening that finds me safely housed with a private family brings news which among crowds would be productive of much pain. My Journey has been accomplished and the whole is over. George and I rode into town in a bleak north west wind and I was glad to find a comfortable fire.
1. A printed program of the dedication services at the New Stone Congregational Church in Quincy, 12 Nov. 1828, is in the Adams Papers. Rev. Peter Whitney preached the sermon.
2. Martin Van Buren was elected governor of New York by a large majority, and even the districts which Adams men had confidently claimed supported the Jacksonian ticket (Daily National Intelligencer, 13 Nov. 1828).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/