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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-04

Wednesday. 4th.

Morning at the Office. Occupied much of the time in drawing up a Paper upon the Middlesex Canal. I intend showing this to my Father, though I am induced to do this from two motives separate from him, my own improvement and information. He would hardly repay me my trouble if I trusted to him. It may be wrong to feel as I do about him, { 342 } but his course hardly makes any other sentiment possible. I trust I feel duly attached to him, but my pride and independence have received a blow which he can never heal. I expected more than he was willing to comply with; I expected an active kindness equal to my own. Not in deeds, if he was unable to assist me, but in words and in manner. I do not desire to exalt myself or depress my brother. But I had sacrificed much for him, and I had done much to put that brother in a way to please him. Much of his condition was owing to my vigilance and care. And when that brother received even extraordinary kindness and I, extraordinary harshness, is it to be wondered at that I cannot root out the remembrance from my mind? I have never written so fully my mind in my Journal, time has taken off much of the bitterness which prevented my doing so, circumstances will probably prevent any positively unfavourable effect upon my prospects, but the memory of coldness from a parent still has force in itself to prompt these lines. In the performance of duty, I console myself.
Read a little Law. In the afternoon, with Abby, pleasantly as usual. Went to pay a visit to Mrs. Saml. Dexter in the evening. She is a pleasant and rather a witty old lady. Abby is a kind of protegé of her’s and I am well pleased that it should be so. Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham were there also.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-05

Thursday. 5th.

Morning at the Office. Received a pleasant letter from John, asking my assistance in a plan of his respecting the French Claims. He wants to get business before them if a Board should be constituted as is expected shortly. I wrote a reply immediately and told him that I would do what I could.1 I was occupied in my Middlesex Canal paper nearly all day. After dinner, went to see Abby at Mrs. Frothingham’s and passed the afternoon there. I went also in the evening, in order to escort her to see Miss Carter who has just lost her brother,2 passing the evening with Mrs. Frothingham, myself.
1. Both of the letters are missing. American citizens had claims of more than $12,000,000 against the French government, dating from the Napoleonic wars. “They included cases of appropriations and condemnations of property in violation of the Convention of 1800, irregular condemnations or confiscations, retroactive condemnations, condemnations under the ‘retaliatory’ Berlin and Milan decrees, . . . and other arbitrary procedures.” For years the American government had vainly sought a settlement, but the newly elected President Jackson was pledged to take a more forceful line (Bemis, Diplomatic Hist. U.S., p. 287–288).
2. William P. Carter, Anne Carter’s brother, died “in a state of insanity” in Elizabeth City, N.J., on 23 January (Columbian Centinel, 7 Feb. 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-06

Friday. 6th.

Morning at the Office. Received very pleasant letters from my Father and Mother. The first was full of interest, being in his peculiar style. The second was very pleasant and disclosed more of the plans than usual. I am glad some of the servants are coming on. It will be a great advantage. On the whole, my spirits were more elated than usual. I was busy in copying the Paper on the Middlesex Canal. Dined at Mr. Frothingham’s with the family and Henry Brooks. He is very pleasant. Abby was not in very pleasant humour, so that I did not have a very agreeable afternoon. This is a candid confession but I am never disposed to make concealments. All I wish to do is to make allowances. Busy, the remainder of the afternoon. In the evening, called for Abby at Mrs. Warren’s. She is an old lady and a very coarse one. The family to whom Julia Gorham is connected are attentive to Abby, so she returns, but excepting the Gorhams, they are my aversion. Returned at ten, perfectly tired out.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-07

Saturday. 7th.

Morning at the Office. Engaged very busily in an answer to my father’s letter [of] yesterday. The famous pamphlet came out this morning, and I read it previous to my writing.1 It serves only the purpose of declaring the war. And I presume that in future we shall have no communication between the parties. I was exceedingly engaged with this letter and my Middlesex Canal Paper. It occupied me all the morning and until four o’clock in the afternoon, hard and constant labour.2
I then went to see Abby as usual and passed the afternoon pleasantly. The death of William Carter which had raised her sympathies very much for her friend Miss Carter was passing over, and she felt less sensitive than yesterday. My only fear about her is that upon entering the world she has too much to learn. Some mortification to experience and some sorrow to bear. In the evening I attended the Debating Society. The subject was the character of Napoleon as given by Dr. Channing.3 Although I had not expected at all to engage in the debate, yet as the question was interesting and my feelings gradually engaged, I hazarded a few words and did better than I expected. I am inclined to believe that I may yet succeed in improving my qualities as a speaker when I wear off the timidity which embarrasses me so much.
1. The eighty-page pamphlet was titled Correspondence between John Quincy Adams, Esquire, President of the United States, and Several Citizens of Massa• { 344 } chusetts concerning the Charge of a Design to Dissolve the Union Alleged to Have Existed in That State, Boston, 1829. It reprinted the earlier documents in the controversy over JQA’s charge that New England Federalists had conspired to divide the Union, along with a detailed reply, dated 28 January 1829, from the “thirteen confederates” which claimed that JQA had failed to present any proof of his accusation. CFA thought that Harrison Gray Otis was the author (CFA to JQA, 7 Feb. 1829, LbC, Adams Papers).
2. CFA’s “A Paper on the Middlesex Canal,” bearing the present date at the end, attempted to examine the income and expenditures of the corporation and to predict its future revenue and dividends. He concluded: “it is only a Property fit for Capitalists—Men who have no immediate necessity for revenue” (M/CFA/21, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 315).
3. See entry for 11 Nov. 1827, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-08

Sunday. 8th.

Went to Church this morning at Federal Street and heard Dr. Channing preach a Sermon which was a very pretty piece of writing but which I could not take much interest in. I confess I was indulging in dreams. Ambition is an enticing subject. And whenever I feel the energies within me rising, I take a pleasure in them which cannot be repressed although there is a weight which hangs over me, with considerable force, keeping down exuberant hope. I am confident of success in life if I live. That is the question. I am entirely in the hands of Providence. In the afternoon, Mr. Noyes preached,1 and I cannot say that I was too much pleased. He was an old Instructor of mine and I wish him well. But had he taken more interest in me, I might perhaps have been more successfull at Cambridge. I was negligent at that time, and finding that it disabled me from pursuing the College studies, I was thrown into other pursuits which perhaps will eventually prove more advantageous. In the evening, attended an Oratorio of sacred Music. Mr. Horn, Mrs. Austin and others. I was pleased though not so much delighted with music as usual. I have not seen Abby today and feel it considerably. Custom and affection soon form heavy bands. Returned in a heavy rain.
1. George Rapall Noyes, Harvard 1818, who was tutor from 1822 to 1827 and served as Hancock professor of Hebrew from 1840 to 1868 (DAB).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-09

Monday. 9th.

Morning at the Office, engaged all the morning though I could hardly tell how. I did accomplish a letter to my Mother which should have gone on Saturday. And I seemed busy without much useful purpose. Another Client this morning. A little conversation with Mr. Davis at Webster’s upon my father’s Pamphlet, which excites a good deal of talk. Afternoon with Abby, pleasantly as usual. Evening at the Office reading Pope.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-10

Tuesday. 10th.

Morning at the Office. Not very usefully occupied. I must again resume my old habits which my late way of life has had an injurious influence upon. Dropped in at Hilliard’s and purchased an annual for Abby. This day completes the two years since I offered myself to her acceptance. And by a singular because unintentional coincidence, the book was called the Anniversary. My feelings have changed with the times. I was then careless, luxurious and independent. I am now cautious, frugal and not my own master. I love Abby but like all lovers pass as much of my time in unhappiness as in pleasure, and above all have still more awful ideas of the future than ever. Mine is a mind fertile in expedients for self torment. And under a strong influence of depression I this evening laid down my soul in Prayer. Dined at Chardon Brooks’ with Abby which unfitted me for study in the afternoon, and returned in the evening. I am sure I feel exceedingly well disposed to every one, but I cannot relish evenings of this kind. And they grind my spirit. I cannot account for their influence. They all feel kindly to me, I believe, and I certainly feel no ill will to them, far from it, but there is a want of something which presses upon me with a rod of iron. Returned home in a snow storm which gives us token of more winter.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-11

Wednesday. 11th.

Arose in better spirits. Morning at the Office, occupied in reading Law. Kent’s Commentaries, the third Volume, which is more to my taste than the preceding ones. Also, some cases in the Massachusetts Reports. Nothing particular happened and no Clients came in. Afternoon with Abby. I was paid for my low spirits yesterday by having a most delightful afternoon today. Such is the waywardness of human life. George came in and had some conversation. The political troubles. My father is now standing on a point. His attitude is commanding. If the future must be war, let it come. Evening, went with Abby to Mrs. Carter’s and called for her on her return. Commenced reading Pelham, a new Novel.1
1. Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer (afterwards Bulwer-Lytton), Pelham; or, the Adventures of a Gentleman, 3 vols., London, 1828.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-12

Thursday. 12th.

Morning at the Office, occupied in reading Law. Nothing of any consequence occurred. Dined at Mr. Frothingham’s. Why is it that { 346 } I should be more than fully tried? I detest these family affairs among “my wife’s relations.” This is the plain sense of my feelings. I am tried1 of going about to people’s houses as a pensioner, and I am tried of trying to be intimate where the difference of manners and feelings and character is such as to prevent the possibility of it. If this is to be a perpetuity, it is a curse, and I shall have eminent reason to repent my marriage. I hope this will not be the result. I love Abby dearly for herself alone, and I do not wish to marry her family. Had I seen her here, instead of at Washington where she was alone, I think I never should have had courage to pierce this Army. Evening, reading Pelham. My head ached, because out of complaisance I drank too much wine. Pleasant conversation with George.
1. Thus in MS, here and again in this line, but probably both are slips of the pen for “tired.”

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-13

Friday. 13th.

Morning at the Office. Suffering under a head ach, the consequence of the wine. I have become so unaccustomed to this article that it has a very unfavourable influence upon my nerves. Received quite a pleasant letter from my Aunt Smith which I answered directly.1 But my reply did not have the point I wished, as my spirits were not high. The wit which formerly sparkled in my letters is nearly extinct. My character is not what it was. It is useless to trace the causes of the influence which has changed it for I know them well.
A little law. Afternoon, Pelham, very interesting. Rather a singular book, but containing much sense, and observation of character. Exaggerated as such books generally are for it is difficult to avoid this in a Novel, and besides, it is easy to call a thing extravagant though much in human life can be found too high wrought even for the wildest scene of a Novel. Yet as we see little out of the common life, in general, we pronounce all equally impossible. Evening, dressed for a Supper party. Had on a Coat which I have never worn before and which I had hoped first to put on for a different occasion.2 My spirits were depressed by it and by the unexpected idea of the Company I was to enter. Mrs. Ignatius Sargent gave the Party and it was very handsome, but the character of the Company was not pleasant to me being People in whom I took no interest, and with whom I have very little in common. My great dislike to this kind of society is that I feel myself in some measure invited on Abby’s account, as a pendant, and this entirely stiffens me. Sat between Abby and Mrs. Frothingham but had a stupid time.
{ 347 }
1. Both Mrs. Smith’s letter and the reply are missing.
2. See entry for 6 Nov. 1828, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-14

Saturday 14th.

Morning at the Office but not much occupied. Wrote a letter to my Mother and conversed with George. My mind was disposed to dissipation of thought, and so I read Pelham. This I finished in the afternoon. I have been much interested in it. The book bears signs of a manly and vigorous mind. The reflection is of a very high character. Novels are in general dangerous resources for studious Lawyers, and I consequently dabble in them but very little. Conversed with George upon it. His mind is a pleasant one from it’s high cultivation, and though it is undirected to any useful purpose from his want of steadiness of [ . . . ] action, it affords agreeable results in desultory conversation. Evening with Abby, found her dull and could not succeed in rousing her. Am I right in wishing this probation over. For the cold and the hot of lovers is after a certain period quite distressing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-15

Sunday 15th.

Morning at Meeting at Dr. Channing’s. Heard him but not with much interest. The sameness of his case worries me. He always talks prettily but not often to any useful purpose. Afternoon, Mr. Gannet with his usual fulminating style. He would have made a capable Pope of Rome in the days of power. Spent an hour with Harriet Welsh and another with George pretty agreeably. Evening at home. Tried to see Abby but found so many people I returned without attempting it. Very stupid at home. I hope not to be condemned to such another sunday evening.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-16

Monday. 16th.

Morning at the Office. Received a pleasant letter from my Mother enclosing a present of a ten dollar bill. This was unexpected and hardly agreeable, for I know she has little and that I should be the one to give. I confess it is a relief though I might easily go on without it. But in accepting it, I shall put a stop to any thing similar in future. Perhaps a time may come when I can return it with interest. Passed a part of the morning in the Court of Common Pleas and George talked away the remainder. Afternoon pleasantly with Abby. I cannot help feeling a wish that ought not perhaps to be indulged, that the engagement was nearer to it’s close. But patience, three months have already { 348 } passed of the additional probation. Evening at the Office, reading Pope. Mr. Fletcher this day became a fellow boarder with me.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-17

Tuesday. 17th.

Morning at the Office and in Court of Common Pleas. Little of any consequence occurred. I am trying to pursue my simple course as well as I can. Had a client this morning through the kindness of Mr. Tarbell. Small debts to collect. Thus went the morning. Afternoon, engaged in reading Adam Smith which Abby’s departure from town enables me to resume. Evening, reading Pope—Eloisa to Abelard. A beautiful letter, if we examine the manner and the versification but something too sensual. I also read many of his smaller Poems.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-18

Wednesday 18th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Three days have been passed in a single case of Leonard Foster against the City. It was so dull I could not stay. Pleas of land are dry things to argue upon. The rest of the morning passed in Law. Afternoon, Adam Smith, Chapter on Colonies. Evening, Pope’s Essay on Man. A style of Poem which does not interest me much. The day spent usefully but not without tedium. I feel the want of good society.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-19

Thursday. 19th.

Morning at the Office. Reading Law but not with any interest. The multiplicity of subjects distracts my attention and the dryness of detail worries my patience. Walked into Court, found the Supreme Court sitting to hear motions. Afternoon, Adam Smith upon the Colonial System, quite interesting but difficult. Evening, Pope Essays and Epistles.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-20

Friday. 20th.

Morning at the Office. And in Court. Heard a case argued of little importance and without affording much instruction. But it is still of service to me to be here as it makes me familiar with practice and with men. Conversation for an hour, with George. Afternoon, finished Smith’s Chapter on the Colonies as a system of policy. Evening at the Theatre. Rob Roy and the Quartette, pieces of very little merit. Madame Feron1 —not pleased with her style of singing. Too artificial. I like art and execution but not alone. It drowns the natural effect of simple sounds when produced incessantly. She did not sing the Soldier { 349 } Tir’d so well as Mrs. Austin. But her voice is sweeter, and her low notes are much more clear and effective. On the whole, not well satisfied particularly as I breasted the heaviest snow storm we have had this winter, on my return. This exertion and a heavy fall which I had put me a little out of spirits.
1. The two operas were Rob Roy MacGregor, or Auld Lang Syne, a musical adaptation of Sir Walter Scott’s novel, by John Davy and Henry Rowley Bishop, and The Quartette, by Charles E. Horn. Madame Elizabeth Feron (1793–1853) was an English singer who had made her first American appearance in 1828 (Brown, History of the American Stage, p. 122).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-21

Saturday. 21st.

Morning at the Office, but rather late. The storm ceased at eight o’clock and we found ourselves in the midst of snow. I have not seen such a spectacle since my Junior year at Cambridge. The depth of it on a level might be a foot and a half. But it lay in some places in drifts of four or five feet. My Office windows were covered so as completely to shut out the light. Wrote a letter to my Mother which occupied all the morning that remained. Afternoon, read over Dr. Channing’s Review of Napoleon’s Life, with a view to discussion in the evening but the meeting1 was so thin, that I took no advantage of it.
1. Of the Debating Society.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-22

Sunday 22nd.

Attended divine service all day at the Meeting House in Federal Street. Heard Dr. Channing in the morning in his usual beautiful but attenuated style. Afternoon, Mr. Gannet upon Education, more sensible than usual. The snow was so deep, and the account of the roads so appalling that I declined the idea of riding to Medford, and passed a very dull day in Boston. Indeed I had calculated so confidently but a week since upon no more repetitions of Sundays in Boston that my disappointment upon the very first strongly impressed me with the idea of folly of human expectation.
This day is not only remarkable as the anniversary of the natal day of Washington. To me it has a dearer association, for two years since I felt that evening for the first time as an assured lover. It dates a revolution in my feelings and sentiments of action of a most fortunate character to me, so far, and may it still continue! From having been a man without action and without purpose, I am become steadily devoted to a single line of conduct, with motives of which none could feel ashamed, and with pursuits which, however they may fail of success { 350 } in the world, are decidedly honourable to myself. I cherish the recollection of the day though it may have come too late.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-23

Monday. 23rd.

Morning at the Office, engaged in examining my Papers for some years past and destroying many of them. I do this in order to arrange the remainder for any future contingency. In reading my brother George’s letters I saw much which reminded me forcibly of by-gone days. Afternoon, Adam Smith. Evening, Pope. Weather excessively cold. The Winter does not relax.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-24

Tuesday. 24th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Little going on of any importance. The day rather dull and I was inclined to head ache. Read over my files of letters from my brother George. They amused me exceedingly and I could destroy only a few. The remainder I put up to be restored to him. Afternoon, in Court, and a Chapter of Adam Smith. Evening, Pope’s Dunciad in which I have never been able to take great pleasure. A slight fall of snow.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-25

Wednesday. 25th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. The place was crowded as it was expected that a case of defamation would come on between Mr. Fales and two Milliners who charged his Wife with stealing. It was carried up to the Supreme Court. I saw more of the practice in this Court than usual, today. Received a sweet Note from Abby1 which made me glad, and a short Letter from my Father together with the Washington Pamphlet of the Correspondence.2 Some of the papers are very astonishing. Afternoon, Adam Smith and evening, Pope. The weather very bad.
1. Missing.
2. JQA had been busy trying to collect evidence to refute the “thirteen confederates” (see entry for 7 Feb., and note, above). The only trustworthy recollection he could secure was that of William Plumer (1759–1850), a former Senator from New Hampshire, who claimed to know at first hand of a New England separatist movement in 1803–1804, which he believed had been revived in 1808 and in 1812. JQA had Plumer’s letter and other supplementary papers added to a new edition of the pamphlet of the Boston Federalists: Correspondence between John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, and Several Citizens of Massachusetts concerning the Charge of a Design to Dissolve the Union Alleged to Have Existed in That State. To Which Are Now Added Additional Papers, Illustrative of the Subject, Washington, 1829 (copy in MHi).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-26

Thursday 26th.

The morning opened with a heavy rain, which acting upon the snow already on the ground, laid our streets some inches under water. The walking was consequently horrible. I went to the Office in the morning but was satisfied to remain at home during the rest of the day. Wrote an answer to my father’s last. It was short and a little dull. I did little else during the morning. Afternoon and Evening passed in reading Mirabeau’s Private History of the Court of Berlin.1 Not very amusing, although good as the models for a spy, into the politics of a Court.
1. The Stone Library contains two copies of Histoire secrète de la cour de Berlin, by Honoré Gabriel Riquetti, Comte de Mirabeau, 2 vols., London and Paris, 1789.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-27

Friday. 27th.

Morning cold and unpleasant. At the Office and in Court. This Controversy has at last excited me very much and I could not avoid writing a short Article for the Patriot, notwithstanding the express injunction of my father to keep quiet.1 The course of the federal Newspapers is too unfair. Nothing going on in Court, so that I continued the examination of my Papers and destroyed a number. Afternoon, read the Trial of Mr. Child for a Libel on Mr. Keyes,2 and a Chapter of Adam Smith. Evening, Pope, Dunciad and his Numbers of the Guardian.
1. CFA’s article did appear in the Boston Patriot & Mercantile Advertiser on 28 February. Commenting on the JQA-William Plumer correspondence, which the paper was printing (see entry for 25 Feb., and note, above), CFA wrote: “It is not our intention, after the manner of some of our cotemporaries, to ask the public, first to take our word, and read afterwards; nor with others, to show only those parts which have not been published before, out of connextion. . . . All we ask, is the attention of our readers to the whole pamphlet taken together.” See GWA to JQA, 28 Feb. 1829, and JQA to CFA, 8 Mar. 1829, Adams Papers.
2. CFA’s copy of the Trial of the Case of the Commonwealth versus David Lee Child, for Publishing in the Massachusetts Journal a Libel on the Honorable John Keyes, Boston, 1829, is in the Boston Athenaeum.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0002-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-02-28

Saturday. 28th.

Morning at the Office. Wrote a letter to my Mother and a short Note to my father besides sending an order to my Tailors in Philadelphia which I note for the sake of remembering the fact.1 This occupied the time until dinner after which I read Adam Smith. Evening at the Moot Court. Heard a short argument and passed the remainder of the evening at home.
1. The letters to JQA and to the tailors are missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-01

Sunday. March 1st.

Attended service in the morning and heard Mr. Gannet deliver a Sermon as usual. Differing but little from any preceding ones which I have heard from him. The day was cold and blustering, fit weather for the month we commence. After dinner, I went to Medford in a sleigh, it being the first time I recollect to have driven a thing of the kind, and the first for a long time that I have been in one. I got there safe and glad to see Abby again after so long a separation. She was more affectionate even than usual, and I felt my feelings soothed and my happiness raised to a degree which has not happened before for a long time. Not that I have not been occasionally very much so, but this was an evening “par excellence.”

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-02

Monday. March 2nd.

Passed an hour with Abby previous to my return to town, pleasantly enough. The day was fair and I came in pretty rapidly. Morning at the Office, writing a letter to my Aunt Smith in reply to one received from her on Saturday.1 Afternoon, engaged in reading Adam Smith but my attention was not fixed to it. So that I gained little. In the evening, Mirabeau, Cour de Berlin, not interesting at all. I felt heavy, and apathetical, if there is such a word. I suspect, a little bilious, for this was my condition last Spring.
1. Both Mrs. Smith’s letter and the reply are missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-03

Tuesday. 3rd.

Morning at the Office. Weather tolerably mild at last. After being engaged some time in filing papers, I went into Court. The Supreme Court of the State commencing its Session this day. I heard an argument on a motion for a release of a Prisoner brought up on Habeas Corpus. This occupied the morning, and I took a Note of it which I passed the Afternoon in filling out, excepting a short time in which I was occupied in reflecting upon my argument about Banks which I am engaged to make before the Debating Society.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-04

Wednesday 4th.

Morning at the Office, and in the Supreme Court where I listened to a case of not much importance. This is the day upon which Genl. Jackson takes upon himself the responsibility of government. It is the day consummating the triumph of his party, and was celebrated accordingly by his partisans here who have never been numerous in this { 353 } quarter, but who were anxious to make some display on this occasion. Guns were fired, the troops paraded and so forth. My father is now a private citizen after a long life of public service. I hope he will feel pleasure in the circumstance, but have yet to see how the change will become him. Four years since, the scene was different and I took my part in the pride and in the pleasure. Now I feel little regret, and little interest in the matter. I could not help thinking that it might be a trying day at Washington though it was not so here.
Afternoon, engaged in writing and reading on the subject of the Banks, and copied very clumsily my Note of the Argument in the morning. I will make an attempt to open the first subject distinctly, and therefore passed a part of the evening arranging and digesting it.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-05

Thursday. 5th.

Morning at the Office and in the Supreme Court. Arguments to unimportant Cases. The weather rainy at first, which afterwards changed to a snow storm. Nothing occurred in the afternoon and I did not pass it very busily, although I reflected upon the subject of Banks. The evening was got through with a very dull manner at home, I being uncommonly heavy and sleepy.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-06

Friday. 6th.

Morning at the Office and in the Supreme Court. Heard an argument in the case of the N.E. Ins. Company against D’Wolf, which I heard in the trial at Nisi Prius. It was interesting and I took a Note of it.1 The weather cleared up in the afternoon. I went home earlier than usual and looked over a File of my Letters to my Mother written last year. They were exceedingly interesting and I did not cease until I read them through. This occupied until late in the evening, and I did nothing else.
1. CFA’s notes on the case of the New England Marine Insurance Company v. James De Wolf Jr., are in his Law Miscellanies (M/CFA/17, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 311).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-07

Saturday. 7th.

I attended in the Supreme Court as much as I could but was exceedingly interrupted divers times during the morning. This I regretted the less on the whole as there was not much of interesting matter going on. Indeed I cannot say I lost any thing. But my time passed rapidly. The afternoon was occupied in arranging my materials { 354 } for what I should say, and the usual duty of writing to my Mother, which was not so interesting as usual because from some reason or other, I cannot find so much subject to write about. In the evening, I attended the meeting of the Debating Society and opened the subject. The attendance was thin and I did not feel inspired, the subject passed much as usual. I was dis-appointed in regard to the animation of the subject and the subject. The other members of the Committee overruling me.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-08

Sunday. 8th.

Attended divine service and heard Mr. Gannet deliver a Sermon somewhat in the usual style. I like him less and less. The morning was cloudy, but as he finished early I took the opportunity of going to Medford before dinner. My horse was unusually lively and I arrived there in a sleigh before their dinner time. Found Abby well and Mr. Emerson the young man there to dine. I was obliged to go and hear him in the afternoon and in the evening had a pleasant conversation with Abby. On the whole my last fortnight has been very happy. And this method of passing Sunday is a luxury. In the evening Mr. Brooks talked to me upon the subject of my marriage disclosing the fact that any further delay should not be made by him to my marriage. Or in other words that as soon as he could fix upon a house for us, we might use our own judgment about it. I feel much obliged to him for this kindness, but the particular moment is passed and now I prefer to postpone until September or October. But I am glad to see some hope of the close of this, and though it may be a thing I should not wish, yet who could help it.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-09

Monday 9th.

Returned to town rather earlier than usual, as Mr. Brooks came in with me. The morning was pleasant and we had an agreeable ride. On reaching town, I attended Court as usual. The Inaugural Address of General Jackson was much the subject of Conversation. It is a feeble production, remarkable for nothing but it’s jesuitical spirit in the leading topics of difference at present agitating the Community, and the strong contrast it presents to the productions of his predecessor.1 The afternoon was passed in writing, and the evening at Dr. Welsh’s, conversing with Miss Harriet upon matters and things in general.
1. For Andrew Jackson’s first inaugural address, see Richardson, ed., Messages and Papers, 2:436–438.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-10

Tuesday 10th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Heard arguments as usual. Nothing material taking place. In the afternoon, I sent out a Writ, being my first exertion of power. Not as I hope to any bad purpose. I wrote off a case or two from my Notes, but I find it very difficult so perfectly to remember the train of reasoning as to be able to fill them out correctly. I attempted to pursue Adam Smith but could not preserve a continued attention. In the evening, I read some of Pope’s lighter prose works. The evening was beautiful and would have reminded us of Spring, had we not a great body of snow upon the ground.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-11

Wednesday 11th.

Morning at the Office and in the Supreme Court. Cases of little interest going on so that attendance is irksome. I nevertheless pursue it as well as I can consistently with the little business I have entrusted to me. My principal surprise and I must add regret, is that the family will write me nothing from Washington. The Inauguration seems to have made them torpid. I am not surprised at the result, though I must confess it is unexpected and unwelcome. Afternoon engaged in writing. I cannot study very well now, but I looked a little into the Law of Trespass, as laid down by Mr. Fuller in the morning.1 Evening, Mr. Pope, Martinus Scriblerus.
1. Henry H. Fuller had appeared for the defendant in the case of Holley v. Huggeford, which CFA had heard in the morning (CFA, Law Miscellanies, M/CFA/ 17, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 311).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-12

Thursday. 12th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. A heavy rain which promises to have an effect upon the great mass of snow and ice now on the ground. In Court both morning and afternoon paying attention to arguments. I have consequently little to say upon the matters foreign to my occupation. In the evening, read Pope. Genl. Jackson is extending his list of proscription rapidly and the most remarkable circumstance is that I do not get a syllable from the family.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-13

Friday 13th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Little or nothing going on and I feel excessively tired of lounging. No letters from home yet. Nothing remarkable took place of any kind. My time is taken up pretty much. In my attendance at Court I am surprised at the absence of every thing { 356 } like agreeable speaking at our Bar. I am aware of the defect, but whether I could do better is a very doubtful point with me. I hope to attempt it at least. In the evening, I paid attention to Mr. Pope.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-14

Saturday. 14th.

Received a long letter from my father this morning, giving his account of the new administration. I was much entertained with it, though its tone from some unaccountable reason or other contributed to depress my spirits considerably. I did not remain in Court this morning and therefore occupied myself in my room as well as I could. Afternoon, wrote a letter to my Mother though she has not sent me a line for a month. Then took a walk which was not very agreeable from the severe cold. The weather continues uncommonly harsh for the season. Evening, Moot Court. No argument, and adjourned for the Season.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-15

Sunday. 15th.

Morning cold. Attended divine Service at the Church on Federal Street and heard Mr. Gannet deliver a tolerably good Sermon upon Prejudices. It suited me on the whole much better than any I have heard from him. After dinner I started for Medford. I reached the Turnpike in pretty good condition and had just reached a Snow bank when my Axle gave way, which put a stop to my proceeding. After some trouble I obtained another Chaise and went on. I thought myself lucky in getting off so cheap. I felt grateful to Heaven though some people think a special Providence is the creation of a vain spirit. I do not. I reached Medford rather later than usual, and spent the rest of the day much as usual.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-16

Monday 16th.

Morning cloudy. Returned to town rather late in order to give time for my Gig to be repaired. I found it ready at Charlestown. Misfortunes however never come single. As I was passing a truck my wheel came too near and turned me over on the pavement without any ceremony. I was not hurt and went on. But I have cause to thank heaven again that I was quit with the fright. My life might have paid the forfeit of my imprudence, though I really did not see what occasioned the shock. But the roads are very dangerous and I feel little or no desire to see more of them than I can help. I felt my bruises all day however and the thing affected me with low spirits. I did little or nothing in the { 357 } morning and in the afternoon, wrote a letter to my father. Evening at home reading the Disowned.1
1. A novel by Bulwer-Lytton, London, 1829.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-17

Tuesday. 17th.

Morning at the Office, occupied in copying my letter to my Father, which took me nearly the whole time. The rest was not passed very usefully. I have another Client. They thus seem to thicken upon me, and I feel on the whole quite thankful for it. Afternoon, reading Adam Smith, but the thread has been so long interrupted that I cannot easily resume. Evening, reading the Disowned, which is very interesting.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-18

Wednesday. 18th.

Morning at the Office. Nothing remarkable. Called into the Justices Court to enter my first action this morning. I felt a little puzzled about it but got along, I suppose as others do. Then in the Supreme Court where I listened to an argument until I was called out to see my friend Richardson who paid me a visit. We chatted pleasantly for an hour. Afternoon in Court. A land cause. Evening, at home reading the Disowned. It is very interesting and what is more it has a deep settled influence upon those who are as ambitious as I am, for I find many of its aspirations echoed within in sounds which I recognized as long and deeply cherished.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-19

Thursday. 19th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. The land cause was going on and as I took no interest in it and found little profit, I went to my Office to study Blackstone over again. Nothing remarkable took place. George showed me an interesting letter from my father which I read with much interest and attention.1 In the afternoon, finished Smith’s Wealth of Nations, a book from which I have derived instruction and amusement. I propose following up the subject with some of the later writers. Evening at the Office reading the Disowned.
1. JQA’s letter contained further details of his fight with the “thirteen confederates” (JQA to GWA, 13 Mar. 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-20

Friday. 20th.

Morning at the Office. Passed in reading Blackstone with some attention. I find myself more acquainted with it than I had expected. Read over in review my file of my father’s letters and found them more { 358 } interesting now than at first. My thoughts were of a mixed character, but they were not unpleasant. I dare not give utterance to them even here. They breathe a spirit of pride and perhaps of vanity which becomes no one. Received a note from Abby intimating a desire to have me remain in Boston on Sunday.1 It made me a little dull. After dinner I was reviewing Smith’s Chapter on Taxes and in the evening read the Disowned.
1. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-21

Saturday. 21st.

Morning at the Office. Looked over some Chapters of Blackstone and a long Essay of Mr. Butler upon the Feudal System. I think I am pretty well acquainted with that subject. In the afternoon. Wrote to my Mother and read Adam Smith. Spirits rather dull on account of my intended stay in Boston. In the evening. Attended a meeting of the Debating Society. The subject was the expediency of religious Controversy. I became warm, but did not say much. The evening passed quietly and rapidly and the subject was not disposed of.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-22

Sunday. 22nd.

Attended divine service all day, at Dr. Channing’s. Heard in the morning Mr. Gannet to whose Sermon I could not pay much attention. In the afternoon, Mr. Frothingham, a very remarkable address, upon toleration. I admire the sentiments of it, though I confess I think them ill adapted to our meridian. We are an intolerant people. The weather was disagreeable and a light snow was falling throughout the day, but as George had not been to the Office yesterday, I went to see how he was. Indolence and inactivity, mental and bodily, are his troubles. I spent an hour with him, and returned to tea. I thought in the evening I would visit Mrs. Frothingham, but was so coldly received that I shall not go there soon again.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-23

Monday. 23rd.

Morning at the Office and in Court. The Judges passed the morning in delivering opinions upon Cases, some of which were tolerably interesting and all of them seemed to be reasonable and sound. I was called out to make a small Writ in the way of my business. There is something encouraging in this to one in progress. Afternoon, reading Adam Smith, finished his Chapter on Taxes. My room was hardly tenable owing to the wind and consequent smoke. Evening, finished the Disowned, and a volume of Pope’s Works.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-24

Tuesday. 24th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Heard an argument upon a Case which was not interesting in itself, but which the difference between the Counsel in the cause made amusing. I do not admire Mr. Rand.1 His is a mind of that narrow stamp which admits impressions out of the mere common line with difficulty. Afternoon, finished Smith and commenced Say’s Political Economy which I propose to take in continuation, but my room was not very agreeable in the high winds of this month. Evening, Pope’s Letters to Wycherley and Walsh.
1. Benjamin Rand, Harvard 1808, had his law office at 5 Court Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-25

Wednesday. 25th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Heard an Argument upon a Case relating to Nahant Hotel. As Abby had written to me yesterday, a request to come out to see her1 and I had been unable to comply, I thought I would make up for it today, and so I went out at one o’clock. The day was cold, but I had a pleasant afternoon. Mrs. Brooks has been quite sick and as usual, little has been said about it. Conversation with Abby and hopes of happiness. It is matter of great gratification to me to find that I have been so well and so cheerful for so long a time, and have had very few dull forebodings such as formerly. I hope strongly though I confess I had a little return this evening. But it was only momentary and my mind made a successful effort to resist it.
1. Letter missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-26

Thursday 26th.

Returned to town this morning without accident. Found a letter for me at the Office from my Mother giving an account of her present situation but not saying a single syllable about her probable time of departure.1 Then in Court, heard a case argued upon stoppage in transitu. This occupied a larger part of the morning. Afternoon, Say’s Political Economy and in the evening, Pope’s Correspondence with Ladies, which is particularly conceited.
1. LCA described the house at Meridian Hill, to which she and JQA had retired after leaving the White House (LCA to CFA, 19 March 1829, Adams Papers). See also entry for 3 April, and note, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-27

Friday 27th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Found a case of but little in• { 360 } terest and did not remain but looked into Blackstone. Afternoon, engaged in Say. His reasoning is clear after reading Smith, though I am disposed to think it incorrect. I was much shocked today by receiving the information of the death of Dr. Gorham, after a short illness. This seems like something entirely foreign from the course of my ideas and only serves to suggest the reflection of the very slight nature of our tenure of this life. But this is a hackneyed subject, and though the idea is one at all times fearful, the expression of it has become commonplace. In the evening, I was more interested than I have been in the Letters of Pope.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-28

Saturday. 28th.

Morning at the Office and in Court, but finding nothing very instructive there I occupied myself in writing a letter to my Mother. Little or nothing of consequence took place. A rumor of an engagement between Mr. Webster and a young lady of this place was the prevailing topic of conversation.1 Afternoon reading Say, the day was mild and pleasant. Abby was in town at Mrs. Gorhams and I found her walking to her brother Edward’s. But of course I could see very little of her. I took a walk as usual, and in the evening sat at the Office reading Pope’s Letters. The Moot Court having adjourned for the Season. Returned home early.
1. CFA thought Webster’s reported engagement to a Miss Parker “a shocking misalliance” (CFA to LCA, 4 April 1829, Adams Papers). The rumor was untrue.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-29

Sunday 29th.

The day was lovely, being the first of the kind which we have had during this season. As Abby wanted me to drive her out of town this morning, I called for her at eleven and reached Medford to dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Everett were there also and we had a tolerably pleasant day. Mrs. Brooks looks ill, very ill. My surprise is that she should continue to live as she does, but this idea would I presume very much distress the family if I was to express it, so I am silent. Returned to town in the afternoon. Roads not of the finest and I was glad to return safe from an excursion not entirely without danger. Evening, a very long walk, which fatigued me more than I expected and so I did not sleep so well as usual, but my day was on the whole very agreeable.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-30

Monday. 30th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Heard an argument which did not instruct me and so returned to read Blackstone. Attendance upon { 361 } Court is useful, but the tedium of it is at times extremely discouraging. In the afternoon. Read Say for an hour and then went to the funeral of Dr. Gorham. The number of persons who attended was very large and there was something solemn in the idea. We followed the body to Brattle Street Church and heard a Prayer from Dr. Channing with an Address by Dr. Jackson. The place was crowded. I could not help feeling this voluntary tribute to moral worth. It struck me more in its simplicity and in my precise state of feeling than would have done much more expensive, perhaps more brilliant exhibitions and performances. Dr. Jackson did not succeed in touching the feelings. These were affected purely by the circumstances. They did not need, nor obtain any adventitious aid. I did not follow the body to the grave, it being late, and about to rain, having paid already my mite of respect to his memory. Evening at the Office, reading Pope’s Correspondence.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-31

Tuesday 31st.

Morning rainy and dull. At the Office and in Court. Heard an argument upon the right of the Mayor and Aldermen to take land for the purpose of making improvements. Mr. Otis gave us a voluntary upon the subject. His manner of speaking is agreeable but not very affecting. He has an easy, graceful manner of saying things which pleases, but not those which convince. I felt today exceedingly affected by my walk of the other evening. My system seemed to be entirely relaxed by it and I was a little disposed to be low spirited, though I received a long and pleasing letter from my father. Afternoon reading Say. Mr. Davis called and chatted with me for some time. I was glad to see him. Evening, Correspondence of Mr. Pope with Aaron Hill. He does not shine very much in that business.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-01

Wednesday. April 1st.

Morning at the Office. In Court for a short time but the case did not instruct me, so after a short conversation with George, I returned to read Blackstone. I feel restless, and troubled at knowing Abby is in town and not seeing her, but I do not know how to go and trouble the family. Afternoon, much interested in the Chapters of Say upon the exclusive system, though not convinced. Took a short walk with spirits only moderate. Evening, Pope’s Correspondence with Swift.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-02

Thursday. April 2nd.

Morning at the Office, and in Court. The Judges occupied the morn• { 362 } ing in delivering opinions upon the different cases argued, previous to their adjourning. Few cases of much importance were passed and I thought the opinions less distinct than they were the other day. The rain fell heavily, and the day was dark. In the afternoon, read Say so long that I weakened my powers of attention. I am disposed to think that the mind will not bear being forced too long, for I always find my best acquisitions are those which are made in short and severe application. Evening, did not go out, but read part of Mr. Blunt’s Annual Register.1
1. Joseph Blunt published the American Annual Register from 1827 to 1835 (Appletons’ Cyclo. Amer. Biog., 1:297).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-03

Friday. 3rd.

Morning at the Office. Received a letter from my mother, in good spirits. But I regret to hear by it that my father talks of purchasing Meridian Hill.1 To be sure, this is no affair of mine, but I was in hopes that nothing would occur to fix him permanently at Washington. The arrangement is not yet complete so that I have still hopes. Read part of Blackstone (over) for the fifth or sixth time. Afternoon, Say. Called to see Abby at Mrs. Gorham’s. Found her well, but felt anxious for her. I do wish most excessively that she was at home. This business is longer and more fatiguing than she ought to be subjected to. Felt dull and out of spirits. Evening, Pope’s Correspondence with Swift and Bolingbroke. Interesting on many accounts as exhibiting human nature though not exactly as they intended. Mr. Tarbell returned from Groton, having buried his father.
1. JQA had leased the home of Commodore Porter on Meridian Hill, just north of Washington (Bryan, Hist. of the National Capital, 2:216).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-04

Saturday 4th.

Morning at the Office. Read Blackstone and felt better than I did yesterday. At twelve I went to meet Abby at Mrs. Frothingham’s and passed an hour with her very happily. She does not seem very well but I was delighted to see her at any rate and she promised to go home on Monday. It was announced to me at home to day that Miss Tufts1 had the Scarlet Fever and that if I remained I might run the hazard of catching it, which was unwelcome news. In the afternoon wrote to my Mother and did little else. Evening, attended the last meeting of the Debating Society and it was an amusing though not a very dignified one. I feel on the whole satisfied with the success I have had here. It { 363 } is well for a Commencement, and this evening, I was flattered by the decided attention that was paid to me.
1. Susan Tufts, a daughter of Cotton Tufts, of Weymouth (JQA, Diary, 18 July 1829). See Adams Genealogy.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-05

Sunday 5th.

Morning pleasant. As Abby was decided to remain in town today, I thought I could not do better than go with George to Quincy. After keeping me waiting one hour, we started and reached there in time for dinner. Found the family quiet and apparently not yet started to move at all. They were evidently in distress about it. Which is foolish, and provokes me. I believe I am not selfish but I do feel as if I do not want to be imposed upon. After dinner, I attended divine service in the New Church and heard Mr. Whitney mumble through as usual. He is a tame man. Returned home after tea and took up my quarters at the Marlborough Hotel.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-06

Monday 6th.

My room was not remarkably good but I rested pretty well and went to the Office early. Found there a very agreeable letter from my father with a remittance to the usual amount.1 He seems to be in high spirits and writes with great animation. This put me in good spirits all day. I cannot say that I did much however excepting to look over the eighth Oration of Cicero against Antony which my father asked me to read. In the afternoon I wrote an answer to him which was long and upon many subjects. Evening, to see Miss Harriet Welsh where I remained until ten.
1. JQA sent a check for $250 (JQA to CFA, 30 Mar. 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-07

Tuesday 7th.

Morning at the Office. But not occupied as I ought to be. Went into the Common Pleas for an hour to hear the Docket called over but found nothing new. Tried to read Blackstone with attention but could not succeed. I wanted to go to Medford, being uncomfortable at the Marlborough. Mr. Brooks asked me to go with him and I went. Passed the afternoon and evening talking with Abby. My marriage seems now to be in serious agitation, and at the same time some solemn reflection occurs to me. I am anxious to do right. Perhaps I am doing wrong. Circumstances will soon decide. I felt a little depressed this evening as latterly I am again becoming frightened.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-08

Wednesday 8th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks. The morning was very fine and the ride pleasant. Found at the Office, a letter for me from my Mother the general tenor of which seemed to be delay. I regret this somewhat though I do not know whether my feeling is not selfish. That the leaving a place which has for so long been their home should affect them is natural enough. Remained at the Office, though my time was not passed as usefully as it should have been. Afternoon, read the lives of Christopher Wren and Edward Coke in the Numbers of the Library of Useful Knowledge.1 Evening, a walk and Pope’s Correspondence. Life at a Hotel is a dreary business. There is so much liveliness in a crowd, that I would prefer the constraint of a private family to the only advantage it possesses, independence.
1. See entry for 2 May 1828, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-09

Thursday. 9th.

The day commenced with clouds and a cold easterly wind which soon brought up a violent storm of rain. As this was the day set apart according to custom in these parts for a Fast, I decided upon going to Medford. Found the family increased for the day by the addition of Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips.1 I cannot say that I made any particular attention to the direction of our worthy Governor.2 Nothing particular occurred out of the usual line.
1. Presumably Lydia Phillips, the youngest daughter of John Phillips and Lydia (Gorham) Phillips, who was a first cousin of Mrs. Everett and of Abigail B. Brooks (Bond, Genealogies of the Families and Descendants of the Early Settlers of Watertown, 2:886).
2. Governor Levi Lincoln had called for a day of public fasting, humiliation, and prayer.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-10

Friday. 10th.

Morning cloudy and cold. Returned to town in time to avoid the rain which set in for the whole of the rest of the day. At the Office. Spirits not good as I am again becoming hypochondriac. Read Blackstone in the morning, Say in the afternoon and Pope’s Correspondence in the evening. My lodgings at the Marlborough though comfortable enough are not to my taste. I am exceedingly in want of society, for my thoughts instead of being diverted to outward objects, turn upon self where there is much which is not agreeable to think of.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-11

Saturday. 11th.

Morning at the Office. Read Blackstone and passed the morning { 365 } very quietly. In the afternoon, wrote a letter to my Mother with very little in it. The Truth is my wit is very barren and I am looking forward to a cessation of the Correspondence. My feelings are somewhat altered about writing, it being more of an exertion than it used to be. Evening, the Correspondence of Mr. Pope. We have had nothing but rain these three days.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-12

Sunday 12th.

Morning clear and pleasant. I took advantage of it to cut my connexion with the Marlborough Hotel and go to Medford. Arrived there early and in consequence attended divine service, morning and afternoon. Heard Mr. Stetson deliver two Sermons upon the subject of truth and the method of developing it which were good. The day was quietly but not very pleasantly spent, more from no particular pleasure in it than from any thing disagreeable. Chardon Brooks came out with Mr. Blodget who took tea here. Weather showery.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-13

Monday. 13th.

Day rather cold for this month but I had a pleasant ride into town from Medford. The roads are becoming better. Morning at the Office. Richardson called and paid me a visit of some length.
George received a letter from Washington asking him to go on and accompany them home.1 He is in such a state of mind, I think it is as well that he should do that as any thing. I cannot help pitying the miserable weakness of his character while I regret it. He has of late rather avoided my society as I neither participate in his griefs which are the result of culpable indolence, nor can sanction the results which it brings him to. This invitation I presume to be the result of a statement in one of my own letters to my Mother some days ago.2 He is undecided as usual.
Read Blackstone. Returned to my boarding house with much gratification. Found the family still out of order but my room was to me a consideration of much pleasure. Afternoon, Say, not interesting nor deep. Evening, Commenced reading over the Spectator with which I was pleased.
1. LCA wrote: “I . . . write . . . my Dear George to beg . . . that you will . . . come on here to escort your father and myself on our way home. You know that we are neither of us famous travellers and your assistance for me will be absolutely necessary” (LCA to GWA, 8 April 1829, Adams Papers).
2. For some time CFA had been telling his mother of GWA’s indolence and aimlessness. On 4 April he suggested that his parents’ early return to Quincy { 366 } would “be of great service to George .... He wants bracing and enlivening. His entire seclusion from society . . . and his want of occupation produce a listlessness peculiarly oppressive. He complains of dejection, low spirits, and inability to occupy himself, and this acts upon reflections of a melancholy kind in regard to Father and himself” (CFA to LCA, 4 April 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-14

Tuesday 14th.

This morning is the first which reminds us of the advance of Spring. I went to the Office early and passed part of my time in the Common Pleas, part at George’s Office talking with him and my Uncle, and part in study of Law. Afternoon, Say and a visit from George, who appears to revive under the new prospect of a journey to Washington. Evening, reading Johnson’s Life of Pope. The day passed pleasantly on the whole, and my spirits were tolerable.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-15

Wednesday. 15th.

Another beautiful day. Morning at the Office. I propose to divide my time now as the mornings have become so long and attempt to read three Branches of the Law at once but these are connected so as to produce no confusion. Afternoon, Say’s Political Economy which strikes me not so favourably as it did formerly, probably on account of the difference of age and judgment. In the evening, the Spectator. I was troubled a little today with head ache for the first time for many months.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-16

Thursday 16th.

Morning at the Office. My head still troubled me a little and continued to do so throughout the day. Read Blackstone and Law as usual. I find this a perplexing business. Afternoon, finished Say and read Cicero’s Eighth Oration against Antony principally on account of my father’s recommendation. The object which he had in view was to explain his manner of writing, but my suggestions are not weakened by their effect. Evening, The Spectator. The day was passed on the whole very studiously.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-17

Friday 17th.

Morning at the Office, reading Blackstone. The weather begins to give signs of relenting. At twelve, I went with George to Quincy to see about my trees, and was engaged during the whole afternoon in transplanting some of the trees which I put down last year. They succeeded uncommonly well during the last year, but the accidents and { 367 } neglect to which they were subjected checked them somewhat. My Uncle this day vacated the house, an event I have long looked for but which when it came surprised me. The mansion looks melancholy and old and ill used and gave me many ideas which I would have preferred not to have had, but so it must be. Returned to town early.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-18

Saturday. 18th.

Morning at the Office. Day clear but cool with an East wind. Wrote a letter to my Mother which I propose to be the last which I shall send. Their silence and perfect indifference to arrangements at Washington puzzles me extremely. Went to see Abby but felt exceedingly low spirited, as my doubts about myself again arise. I am coming to the point so that my mind ought to be braced up to it. Afternoon. Commenced reading Clarendon1 and was much struck with the style of the Preface. Rode to Medford with Abby this evening. But I felt very singularly all the evening.
1. CFA’s set of The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, by Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, 8 vols., Oxford, 1826, is in the Stone Library, along with two other copies owned by JQA. JA’s copy is in the Boston Public Library (Catalogue of JA’s Library, p. 126).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-19

Sunday. 19th.

Morning cloudy and dark. I remained at the House reading the North American Review. Nothing remarkable. Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips came from Winter Hill to dine and Henry Brooks got home to day. Gorham, his brother, took leave. He marries Ellen Shepherd tomorrow and departs for Europe. I am not sorry that he goes. His manner to me has always been cold even to incivility, and though I feel too independent of him to trouble myself about it, yet whenever I have met him, it has created an awkwardness on my part which was not comfortable. How terrible it is to dance attendance upon the whims of other people. If my own spirits and confidence in myself were only firm, I could resist it more proudly. But on this point my spirits are rather low, particularly at this time.
Afternoon. Took a walk to the Lock and Aqueduct over Symmes River or Creek. It was pleasant enough and I saw the piece of Stone work which is certainly large and solid. It does credit to the perseverance of the Company. Passed the remainder of the day with Abby but somehow or other it was not one of our congenial days. She was not affectionate and so this in the result made me cold and dispirited. I wanted affection much and I found it not.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-20

Monday. 20th.

Returned to town this morning, the weather being like Spring but damp. Found at the Office little or nothing but a short letter from my Mother intimating that Johnson Hellen had at last come out with his intention much to the discomfort of all the family.1 I gathered this also from an Advertisement of John’s in the Newspaper. It is a sad blow, but we must not expect all things to go exactly as we would have them in this world, and in our family particularly. When I look at them and our prospects, it makes me very dull. The consciousness which now rests with me that I am the only hope of the number, makes me feel more deeply the obstacles which may block up my path. Dull all day. Spent the evening at Dr. Welsh’s in conversation with Miss Harriet.
1. LCA’s letter is missing. Johnson Hellen had announced his intention of marrying Jane Winnull, LCA’s servant. On 20 April the Washington Daily National Intelligencer carried this marriage notice: “On Saturday evening last [18 April], by the Rev. Mr. Matthews, Johnson Hellen, Esq. to Miss Jane E. Winnull, both of this City.” See note on entry for 24 April 1827, above; entry for 25 April, below; and Adams Genealogy.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-21

Tuesday 21st.

Morning at the Office. Received another letter from my Mother somewhat longer but as I think rather more depressed. She seems much affected by this affair. Read law and had conversation with George who entertained very erroneous impressions upon that subject which might one day lead him I fear to a similar miserable resolution if thrown in the way of it.1 Afternoon, Clarendon. Another of our family at Avon Place taken down with the Scarlet Fever and carried out of town. I felt as if I was to be the next, and my spirits were dull. Evening, the Spectator.
1. CFA’s concern for his brother was all too justified. See entry for 13 May, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-22

Wednesday. 22nd.

Morning at the Office. Felt dull and unwell, but finished a Volume of Blackstone and spent an hour in the Common Pleas, besides seeing Richardson and chatting with him. Afternoon, engaged reading Clarendon, whose history is very interesting and instructive. The evenings have become inconveniently short so that I had barely time to read half a dozen Numbers of the Spectator.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-23

Thursday. 23rd.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Received a pleasant letter from my father upon general subjects which I reflected upon much during { 369 } the morning. His style to me is flattering to my vanity and he no doubt so intends it. Read a little law and rode to Medford to dine. The weather was very warm. Mrs. Brooks was unwell again. Conversation with Abby. Better pleased with her than last time, though she is still cold.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-24

Friday. 24th.

Returned to town this morning. Conversation with George. At the Office reading Blackstone which did not give me much information. The weather dark and gloomy. Afternoon, finished the first Volume of Clarendon’s History, comparing it with Hume. The foundation of Hume seems to be good but he frequently throws false lights upon the building. It rained so that I omitted my usual reading in the evening. Miss Susan Tufts very ill.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-25

Saturday 25th.

Morning at the Office, engaged in writing an answer to my father and in doing it I could not help writing also a short Note to my Mother.1 On opening my Intelligencer I was struck with the notice under the marriage head. Johnson Hellen to Jane E. Winnull. The die is cast, and my mother has only an additional trial. I regret it most on her account, for though Johnson was once a friend of mine, I have seen too long the victorious progress of his evil qualities not to have been warned of the result. May a similar misfortune never come nearer home in the family. I have no design to forebode. Amused myself for the hour which remained after copying and sending my letter, in reading the Life of Dryden together with his tragedy of All for Love.2 It is not so good as I expected, the beautiful passages hardly redeeming the general character of the piece, and yet it is called his best. Evening, engaged in reading some numbers of the Spectator. This was Abby’s Birth day and she is twenty one.
1. Missing.
2. CFA’s copy of the Poetical Works of John Dryden, 4 vols., London, 1811, is in the Stone Library, as is JQA’s set of the Dramatick Works, 6 vols., London, 1735.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-26

Sunday 26th.

Morning clear but cold. Rode to Medford to dine. Found Mr. Walker, the Minister of Charlestown, Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips, besides the usual family. Mrs. Brooks still too unwell to come down. Mrs. E. is not by any means improved by her last visit to Washington. The evening was passed delightfully.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-27

Monday. 27th.

Returned to town with Abby in company. Weather cold but not unpleasant. At the Office. Found George had received a letter and was about to start for Washington.1 I think this a good plan. Morning read Blackstone. After dinner, some of Sir Joshua Reynolds with an Account of his Life.2 George came in and had some Conversation with me. He seemed very much disarranged. As usual delay has done him no service. He might as well have gone at first. Evening, reading, the Spectator.
1. JQA wrote: “I wish you to come on [to Washington] immediately upon receiving this letter; to return with us” (JQA to GWA, 20 April 1829, Adams Papers).
2. CFA’s copy of the Complete Works of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 3 vols., London, 1824, is in the Stone Library, along with another edition, London, 1798, owned by JQA.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-28

Tuesday 28th.

Morning at the Office. Weather cold and chilly. Reading Blackstone, in the Court of Common Pleas and engaged in making a Writ. My professional business continues still. Conversation with George who goes positively tomorrow. I rode to Quincy after dinner in a sharp piercing East Wind. Gave some directions about the Garden and went up to see my Uncle. The family are very comfortably and prettily settled in their new residence and on the whole I think it more comfortable than the old one.1 Much conversation but there is something sticking at bottom which made them dull, which I could not at all understand. How great a similarity all sense of wrong creates in conduct in all men. George and my Uncle are both quivering under the fear of the merited reproaches which my father can though he will not give them. Returned rather later than I had expected so that it was nine o’clock when I reached my Office. Read the Spectator until ten.
1. TBA and his family had moved to “the old Ruggles farm and house,” which still stands though greatly altered at Elm and South streets in Quincy and which was occupied by TBA’s two unmarried children until the present century (HA2’s Notes in Adams Papers Editorial Files).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-29

Wednesday 29th.

Morning at the Office. George went positively this morning and left his affairs with me. I commenced making some arrangements to repair that Office in order to go into it.1 Did not pass the time very usefully. In Court a short time. Afternoon. Continued Clarendon and in the evening the Spectator. The East Winds have set in as usual and are exceedingly disagreeable.
{ 371 }
1. CFA planned to abandon his office at 10 Court Street and to move into a little room adjoining GWA’s office at 23 Court Street, which, however, had to be painted and repaired (CFA to JQA, 6 April 1829). CFA hoped the new arrangement would save money.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-30

Thursday 30th.

Morning at the Office. Read law as usual. Nothing remarkable occurred and I was again somewhat dissatisfied with my way of passing it. My mind has become a little distracted and not quite so able to study as it was in the autumn. At one o’clock I went to Medford. The weather very cold and chilly. Found the family as usual. Nothing to notice. Mrs. Brooks much better and downstairs. Evening pleasantly passed.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-01

Friday. May 1st.

The morning was not by any means such as to merit the character which poets give of the month. Returned to town with Abby who came in to look at a house which is offered to her. This looks really like marriage. I intended going to see it myself but was too late. Read a little law but did not feel perfectly well. After dinner, read Clarendon. Mr. Fletcher had some conversation with me in which he asked me to contribute to the American Jurist, a law publication here, a compliment which flattered me though I felt that I did not deserve it. Evening read the Spectator. My spirits have become very good again.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-02

Saturday May 2nd.

I sit down to record the Journal of this day with an aching heart and a depressed mind. The gloom which surrounds me in all my reflections, it is impossible to shake off. Went to the Office as usual and into Court. Upon my return from which as there was nothing of interest going on, I found Mr. Brooks who was here to tell me of an accident which had happened, the News of which had just arrived by the public papers. I was totally unprepared for such a shock, and it seemed to turn the current of my blood. I felt no other emotion excepting the chill under the skin which seems to be like it’s stagnation. My poor brother George had either accidentally or in a fit of derangement, signs of which he had previously manifested, gone over from the Deck of the Franklin on her way to New York. I could not realize it at all. I went to see Harriet Welsh and Mr. Brooks for advice. It was recommended to me to remain here, and the first talked to me in a manner which I shall long remember. This feeling is the lot of us all, but when a blow like { 372 } this comes unexpectedly, it strikes with double vehemence. I wrote a few lines to my father,1 and I bent my soul in humble and fervent prayer that God would soften the stroke upon my poor afflicted parents. They have many trials but this surpasseth them all. I remained in my room all the afternoon, attempting to divert my attention by looking over my Mother’s papers, but a sense of dullness weighed heavily upon me.
1. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-03

Sunday 3rd.

I have heard nothing of this excepting through the public papers but the account is so circumstantial I dare not disbelieve it.1 My thoughts rest upon the horrible circumstances, and the singular indifference with which he was observed in his extravagance. Poor fellow, he complained to Dr. Welsh before he went, but I never suspected alienation of mind or he should never have gone. I went to his room and examined his papers. They display nothing but pain, mental agitation about his future prospects which he had much indulged in, but no despair. I destroyed some things which I thought his imprudence had left, and in looking over his own memorials of his mind, I could not help feeling a mixture of emotions which only hereafter shall I be able to describe.
1. The Boston Daily Advertiser reported on 4 May the “melancholy event” of GWA’s death. Arriving in Providence on Wednesday, 29 April, he had boarded the Benjamin Franklin for New York. He was rational and cheerful during the afternoon, but by evening he began to complain of severe headache. As the evening progressed he “exhibited some decided symptoms of mental alienation,” hearing imaginary voices and suspecting his fellow passengers of conspiring against him. About three o’clock in the morning of 30 April he asked the captain to stop the ship and let him ashore. Shortly thereafter he disappeared, and his hat was found near the stern. “The supposition is that he fell overboard and was drowned.”

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-04

Monday 4th.

My morning was principally occupied in looking over the papers which my brother left at his Office. Knowing his continual preservation of all papers, I feared that some might remain which would grieve the family. I found three or four which I destroyed. George had an extremely amiable disposition, but he was the creature of impulse and frequently gave way to the seductions which an ill regulated imagination excited. My father almost lived in him and the loss will to him indeed be dreadful. My anxiety to hear from there is great. My own reflections are gloomy and I pray God for assistance and aid. But as I find that my thoughts turn more and more upon it, I see the necessity { 373 } of occupation and therefore read Clarendon but without much profit as my mind wandered from it. In the evening, I went to see Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham and their conversation helped to pass away the evening. Abby wrote me a very kind note1 on Saturday in which she promised to be in town if I asked to see her. My letter2 did not reach her for this morning and the rain prevented her coming.
1. Missing.
2. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-05

Tuesday. 5th.

Morning at the Office. The men came this morning to make the repairs to my room. I presume since this accident that the other1 will devolve upon me, but as the repairs have been commenced, I believe, I shall pursue them. I went down to see Abby who was in town but did not feel very much inclined to converse, and I was sorry to perceive that she was more troubled than I wished. It always grieves me to see her vary from her high tone of spirits and when I am the cause of it in any manner, it pains me the more. I was busy during the rest of the morning. Attempted to read Clarendon in the Afternoon, but without much success. Received a letter from my father on miscellaneous subjects. The tone will be quickly altered when this dreadful information arrives. Evening, a walk, and a few Numbers of the Spectator.
1. GWA’s office. See entry for 29 April, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-06

Wednesday. 6th.

I have felt utterly unable to apply myself to any study of Law this week and on that account, it is perhaps lucky that I have had some occupation for my thoughts in the alterations I have ordered in the Office I am about to occupy, and the arrangements which it is necessary for me to make thereupon. My books were all moved upon shelves again after having been lying about for a long time. I do not now look forward so anxiously to the future. Afternoon, tried some of Clarendon. The weather was very warm and pleasant. But I felt rather languid, and in very middling spirits. No letters this evening which keeps me still in suspense. My anxiety to receive some information from home is very great, though at the same time I dread it. Evening, some Numbers of the Spectator.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-07

Thursday 7th.

Morning at the Office. Nothing very remarkable occurred. I was engaged much of the time in making my arrangements for my other { 374 } room. I also went down to see Abby who was in town and wanted me to go out. But I did not feel as if I could while I was liable to receive letters in my absence. My spirits were better but still a great pressure constantly exists. Afternoon reading Clarendon. The weather very pleasant. I did receive two letters this evening. One from my father and one from John.1 They are a little encouraging as to the effect upon my Mother. She bears it better as yet than I had hoped. But the first shock is not all. John’s letter is kind and reminds me of the additional obligations which fall upon us, a circumstance of which I have already thought not a little. My will is good, and I trust to Heaven for it’s watchful guidance and protection, to allow me to perform all which it is my duty to do. And I now feel a strong desire to live which I never had before, and which also adds more terror to my despairing moments. But these shall not in future be so numerous.
1. “We are in great distress,” JQA reported; “but I write to inform you that the first shock of this heavy dispensation of Providence is past, and that your mother and myself, relying on him who chastiseth in Mercy, still look for consolation in the affectionate kindness of our remaining Sons” (JQA to CFA, 3 May 1829, Adams Papers). The letter from JA2 is missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-08

Friday 8th.

Morning at the Office. I attempted to read a little Law but could not succeed very well. The Painter came to do his part to my new room, which in this way goes on progressing. Finding I could not do much with Chitty on Contracts, I sat down and wrote a letter to my brother John.1 Perhaps the Contents were not very prudent, but I did it with the best intentions. I do most earnestly hope they will soon come, at least some portion of the family, but I confess I see but little prospect of it. I went to Medford today with Mr. Brooks to divert the time. Found them alone and Mrs. B. a little dull about herself. There is another prospect which I do not much like to examine.2 But I never saw her when I felt so strongly for her. Evening with Abby.
1. Missing.
2. Mrs. Brooks’ illness was to lead to her death in 1830.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-09

Saturday 9th.

Morning, returned to town with Mr. Brooks who was very kind and pleasant. On my return, I received a letter from my Aunt Smith1 in a strain dismal enough, but still giving me some assurances of the condition of my Mother. I feel incredibly easier since I have heard this. My father suffers as I thought he would, the tree has felt the lightning, the branches only have materially suffered, I hope. The trunk { 375 } however feels the blow. Dr. Welsh called to see me with a message from Harriet. They are in misfortune as Thomas and John are ruined.2 This news came yesterday and astonished me much. I am very sorry for them both. Morning passed in reading Law though my mind is still unable to fix itself. Afternoon, I went to see Harriet, and to obtain some of my brother’s papers which I wish to arrange a little. She asked me to draw a Deed which I did to convey the Furniture of the House to her. But it was not executed though she gave me the trouble of going all the way up there in the evening about it. I remained in my brother’s room looking over his things and talking of them all evening, and did not return home until after ten.
1. Missing.
2. Thomas Welsh Jr., Harvard 1798, a lawyer, and John Adams Welsh, a merchant, had suffered a severe financial reverse. See entry for 6 July, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-10

Sunday 10th.

Morning cloudy with showers of rain. I rode to Medford. The country looking beautiful. The grass has just attained that vivid green which it possesses upon first growing and which the novelty and the short time it remains make peculiarly refreshing to the eye. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks were exceedingly kind to me and I felt almost as if I was at home. I am grieved to see how she looks. Mrs. Everett came in the afternoon and drank tea. On the whole, this was a very pleasant day.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-11

Monday. 11th.

Returned to town in a cold wind and not very pleasant day. Found letters from my father and John.1 The latter at New York, expected to see me but I was not there. My engagements have been such that I am glad I did not go on. It would have been very inconvenient to me, and have involved a return to Washington which I do not desire. I am more usefully employed here in looking over and arranging my brother’s papers, which occupied me all day. My father’s letter was more staid and sedate but still in great distress. I succeeded in arranging George’s Accounts a little more clearly and hope now to see my way out. In the evening, a few Numbers of the Spectator. Rain again.
1. JQA expressed thanks for CFA’s “truly filial offer of service” and promised to avail himself of it “hereafter, in such manner as may most comport with your own inclinations and intentions” (JQA to CFA, 6 May 1829, Adams Papers). The letter from JA2 is missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-12

Tuesday. 12th.

Morning at the Office. Weather cool and clear. Received a letter { 376 } from my Mother in low spirits but on the whole calculated to relieve me. I was again engaged in reviewing my poor brother’s papers which fatigued me exceedingly and I have determined to do no more until my father directs. Indeed I see little or nothing more to be done. The disorder is such as cannot be unravelled and all that can be done is to begin anew. I wrote an answer to my Mother in the Afternoon and stopped the subscription to the Essex Register for George. Read a little of Clarendon and of the Spectator in the evening.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-13

Wednesday 13th.

Morning at the Office, and at the House where poor George was, looking over his papers to find the Certificates and policies which he mentions as being in his possession, but I was unable to find them. In examining one Trunk which I had not opened before, I came across a paper which I recollect his saying to me that he addressed to me. It was in the shape of a request in case he died during the year 1828 that his debts should be paid and the balance given to a little girl whom he had seduced and who was then pregnant by him, to the best of his belief.1 I was anxious to get possession of this paper, as it might pain my father, and as the provision upon which it depended failed, he having survived the year, it could have been of no avail. His debts to my father are so large that the balance will amount to little, and that would be too much to put into the hands of a weak young girl to say the least of it. Indeed his wish was it should be secured from her and forfeited in case of ill conduct. I shall do what I can in pursuit of the spirit of the request, though I confess the whole to be a foolish effusion of a thoughtless moment. I destroyed the paper, it being in itself of no value, and apparently laid aside among a parcel of old papers, not thought of again. But I will attempt to find her out, and preserve her, if possible, from destruction.
I went out of town with Mr. Brooks and passed the afternoon and evening with Abby. A house in Hancock Avenue is purchased for her and now she is to prepare to take possession. I am not so eager for the marriage now, my poor brother’s fate still pressing upon me.
1. The girl was Eliza Dolph, who had been a chambermaid at Dr. Welsh’s (Farmer-Storer Trial, p. 8). Her affairs were to occupy much of CFA’s time in the following weeks. See entries for 28 May and 16 July, below. For CFA’s earlier forebodings that his brother might have entered such an unfortunate liaison, see entries for 21 and 25 April, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-14

Thursday 14th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks. The morning was lovely and { 377 } the ride pleasant. At the Office, found Mr. Watson, who came up to pay a part of his debt, and agreed that an alias should be taken out for the balance. Occupied myself with law and found that I was better able to understand it. In the afternoon, I called at Hilliards to look at the amount of his bill against George and found it nearly eighty dollars since January. I regret his extravagance exceedingly because it goes to show the state of his mind. My reproach of January last was literally true although I regretted it. His debt will impose upon my father a disagreeable business. Read Clarendon, and the Spectator in the evening.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-15

Friday 15th.

Morning at the Office. Provoked to think that I had no letters. I am now so anxious to hear what they propose to do, that it worries me for I want to vacate my present abode, and do not like the idea of changing it for a Hotel. I read some of Chitty on Contracts and bought a Paper for my new Office which is going to be very pretty. I am afraid in this I was more extravagant than I ought to have been. Afternoon, engaged in reading Clarendon, which was very interesting. There is a very manly style about this which we do not find at the present day. Evening, in consequence of what I heard at tea of a letter from Abby Adams1 saying that my Mother was sick, I became alarmed and went to see Harriet Welsh who happened to have the letter with her. It was of a date three days earlier than mine from herself and said nothing about my Mother’s sickness, so that I felt relieved at it’s being a false alarm. Conversation. The letter was in the high flown style of that family and to me disgusting.
1. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-16

Saturday. 16th.

Morning at the Office, weather cloudy and chilly. No letters from home. I wrote a short one to my Father strongly urging him to come on.1 I think it is very necessary and essential. Read a little of the Jurist, a law publication which has lately come out and which I mentioned some days ago. Went to Medford with Mr. Brooks. It rained heavily all afternoon. I unwarily became engaged in a conversation with Abby and suffered my temper to go farther than usual which pained me exceedingly. But repentance is a very poor business unless it lead to amendment. Evening passed very pleasantly.
1. Since GWA, who had acted as JQA’s agent in Boston, had left his papers and financial affairs in great disorder, CFA wrote his father: “I would submit the { 378 } expediency of your coming as soon as you feel able so to do, in order to take into your own hands again the direction of your affairs” (CFA to JQA, 16 May 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-17

Sunday 17th.

Beautiful spring Morning. I went to Meeting this morning and heard Mr. Stetson preach a long and rather a dull Sermon. On the whole it did me no good and in the Afternoon I felt oppressed with head ache and staid at home. Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips dined here, and P. Chardon Brooks came out with a certain Col. De Kay formerly of New York now in the service of Buenos Ayres. He seemed to me to be a foolish, conceited puppy of the Porter1 kind, full of bravado and vulgarity. Evening with Abby. I had a terrible nervous head ach which made me a very unpleasant companion.
1. A watchdog (OED).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-18

Monday. 18th.

Another beautiful morning. Returned to town with Mr. Brooks. I felt exceedingly depressed. Sometimes, this sensation comes over me and I can scarcely feel equal to any exertion whatever. The sense of the responsibility of my present situation comes heavily over me, and the idea of the condition of the family, should any thing happen to me, is too distressing. Formerly I had only the apprehension on my own account, now how much it is increased. I derive consolation and support only from my religious feelings, and the sense of performing my duty so far as in me lies. Read Law this morning and transacted a little business. My father’s Affairs need attention. In the afternoon, read Clarendon and much interested in his Account of the Civil War, and the character of Falkland. It is beautifully drawn. Took a walk and felt soothed by the softness of the air and the beauty of the verdure with which the Common is covered. This is a sweet spot. In the evening, a few numbers of the Spectator. One on Prayer.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-19

Tuesday. 19th.

Morning at the Office. Still no letters which keeps down my spirits exceedingly. Occupied myself in writing and reading Law. The weather was fine but exceedingly warm.
I thought I would go up and see the House which is destined for me.1 I examined it all over and was on the whole very much pleased with it. But I cannot realize the belief that I am really to live there. My feelings have always been that I should never marry and even now { 379 } when I see the preparations most actively going on I cannot overcome my presentiment. This might have been avoided, had I been married at once last Autumn, but now circumstances contribute to increase this old feeling powerfully. I do trust in Heaven.
I was so dull to day that I was glad to see Richardson who called to pay me a visit, and we decided upon dining together at the Exchange Coffee House which is open again. Our dinner was good and time agreeable, after which we decided upon riding to the Railway House. The weather was pleasant, but I got home on the whole, fatigued and disgusted even with pleasure.
1. P. C. Brooks purchased for his daughter the house at 3 Hancock Avenue, where the Adamses lived during the early years of their married life (Boston Directory, 1830–1831).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-20

Wednesday. 20th.

Morning at the Office. The weather which threatened great heat cooled off by one of the sudden changes of wind to the East so common in this climate and we had a damp and chilly afternoon. Still no letters. My family seem to have deserted me. Mr. Hollis called to see me in regard to the Common Street Houses which need immediate attention, but I was totally unable to give any directions.1 How unfit my brother was for active life appears to me more striking every day. My spirits still depressed but on the whole much improved. Read Clarendon in the afternoon and in the evening, after a short walk which the chill in the air prevented me from enjoying. I read a few Numbers of the Spectator at the Office, which I must confess I relish for the first time.
1. Daniel Hollis, a housewright, lived in a house owned by JQA in Common (or Tremont) Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-21

Thursday. 21st.

Morning at the Office. The weather which had been cold and chilly cleared up at noon. I attended to the papering [of] my room which is the last repair I put to it. I now have only to furnish it. My time was in some measure wasted in attendance upon two Auctions where I was desirous of obtaining some things but did not succeed. I rode out to Medford with Mr. Brooks. Found Abby as usual. Mrs. Brooks quite sick. Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham were out in the afternoon, and were very pleasant. On the whole, the day passed rapidly. In the evening, Conversation with Abby. Future Arrangements.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-22

Friday 22nd.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks and Abby. The weather was delightful and the softness of the air spread an agreeable influence over my feelings, which they needed very much. At the Office I was exceedingly disappointed at not finding any letters from home and began to think they had given me up. The morning was passed in a lazy way. Richardson called and sat an hour but I was exceeding dull. Afternoon reading Clarendon which interested me very much, particularly in the account of the civil war when it turned against the king. Took a walk. My system feels the effect of Spring here very much. But I had a better appetite this evening than for a week past. Went to see Miss Harriet Welsh who gave me some News regarding the arrangements of the family and that John and his wife were to come on.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-23

Saturday. 23rd.

Morning at the Office. Occupied in writing as usual and preparing my room for establishing myself. It looks very handsome but has cost me more than I had intended that it should. The weather was very warm indeed. I went to Medford with Mr. Brooks. Found P. Chardon Brooks and his wife there. I have not seen her before for a long time. She looks ill. The family are very much alarmed at the condition of Mrs. Brooks the elder, and justly so. Her health is now very alarmingly affected as I have too much feared it would be. Abby’s spirits are correspondingly affected, much to my regret. I hope much still. For the idea of the loss of her is too painful. She has always had to me the kindness of a Mother. I have never experienced any other feeling. Abby had a head ach and [was] unwell.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-24

Sunday. 24th.

The day was beautiful. One of those lovely ones which we have when the new approach of Summer throws every thing like vegetation out in the most brilliant colours. When the whole Country shows forth with vivid and brilliant green, and the air is soft and delightful to second the effect. I went to Meeting in the morning and heard a certain Mr. Gannet whom I did not like at all.1 Mrs. Everett and Miss Phillips at dinner. Mrs. Brooks very unwell. Abby also unwell until evening when she became better and was with me.
1. Presumably Thomas B. Gannett, a Congregational minister in Cambridge (Mass. Register, 1829, p. 113).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-25

Monday. 25th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks. The weather exceedingly warm and as I was embarrassed with my weight of clothing, I felt very uncomfortable. Morning at the Office. Received a letter from my mother which was short and contained little or no information, upon the subject which I am anxious to hear about.1 The fact seems to be that they are as yet in statu quo. Tried to read a little Law, but was so busy moving and my mind so little capable of attention that I soon gave it up. This must not be. But I am anxiously waiting to hear from home as to what I must do, which will materially influence any occupation I might adopt. Patience. Dined solitary and alone. Read Clarendon in the afternoon although my Office was rather oppressive. I suspect it is rather warm in the summer season. Read the account of the battle of Naseby and the conduct of Charles. Very interesting. Evening, a few Numbers of the Spectator.
1. “I would write you of our plans,” LCA told her son, “but all is uncertainty and still there is no time fixed for our departure” (LCA to CFA, 19 May 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-26

Tuesday. 26th.

Morning at the Office. Rainy day but warm. Engaged in writing up my old Index which I intend to supersede all my old Diaries in which there is too much silly matter. Also read a little Law but without any relish. Afternoon reading Clarendon. Account of the confinement of the King. Charles had the misfortune to be a weak king with high notions. He had not character to check his friends, much less his enemies. One reads the History pitying his situation and despising his advisers excepting a few who were not always most prized, such as Clarendon himself, Hopton, Capel, Ormond. Again no letters from home. My father really ought to answer me. I felt very much disappointed. Passed the evening at Dr. Welsh’s. Conversation with Miss Harriet. I was rather more cautious.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-27

Wednesday. 27th.

Morning at the Office. Engaged very busily all day in arranging my new Office, which is now ready for removal. I am pleased with it as it promises to be something permanent. It is probable that it will serve me for an Office during my life and this reflection is agreeable after having been tossed about as I have been from place to place. My brother’s papers are as yet an incumbrance, but I hope presently to make a disposal of these. The weather was very warm and it was Elec• { 382 } tion day, which is commonly a season of great bustle and noise, but with me today no inconvenience was perceived. In the afternoon, I continued reading Clarendon, though not now so interesting. The detail of the miserable intrigues of the Court faction is disgusting. Again no letters. I felt disappointed tonight because I begin to think that it is not at all probable, that my father proposes coming at present. Procrastination is the character of our family. In the evening, after paying a visit to Susan Tufts who is now sufficiently recovered to be about to return to Weymouth, I walked an hour on the Common.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-28

Thursday. 28th.

Morning at the Office. Occupied as usual in writing and engaged in making my changes. Mr. Farmer called upon me and had some Conversation upon my brother’s affairs. I was a little shocked by what he told me.1 George’s fate was melancholy but on the whole, I have been forced to the unpleasant conclusion that it was not untimely. He would have lived probably to give much misery to his friends and more to himself, and he died when his fate was not so evident as not to admit of a doubt, and a favourable construction so that his memory will be cherished by his friends, and his end lamented.
I commenced reading Starkie on Evidence. Went out to Medford in the Carriage with Mr., Mrs. and Abby Brooks. Afternoon and evening pleasant with her.
1. Miles Farmer looked after the Boston real estate, located on Hanover and Mechanic streets, owned by Martin Thayer, of Amherst; as partial payment for his services, he, along with his wife and four children, was allowed to live rent free in one of these houses. In January 1829, allegedly at GWA’s request, Dr. David Humphreys Storer persuaded Farmer to take Eliza Dolph (see entry for 13 May, and note, above) and her illegitimate child, now six or seven weeks old, into his family, as a measure “to restore the mother to her friends and society again.” According to Farmer’s subsequent account, GWA’s continued attentions to Eliza aroused the suspicion of other tenants and imperiled Farmer’s job. To persuade him to keep Eliza and their child, GWA offered to tell the whole story to Thayer or to give Farmer $100 in order to secure “the agency of the Union Soap Stone Factory,” on Front Street. Then GWA’s suicide deprived Farmer of both his character reference and his financial backer. Having lost his job with Thayer, he was now laying the groundwork for an attempt at blackmail (Farmer-Storer Trial, passim). See entry for 16 July, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-29

Friday 29th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks in a shower of rain, the wind was very chilly and I was in a very light dress, so that I was extremely apprehensive, I had caught cold. Morning at my new Office. After having removed all the remainder of my things from my other Office. { 383 } I sat down and read Starkie with a great feeling of comfort. I take more pleasure even than I expected in the change. Afternoon Clarendon. Account of the death of the King, together with Hume’s Apology for his Character. Still no letters. The day was cloudy with rain, so that in the evening, I remained at home, conversing with Mr. Fuller who was a visiter and a certain Mr. Williams.1
1. James Williams Jr. See entries for 24 and 30 July, below, and CFA to JA2, 30 July 1829, LbC, Adams Papers.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-30

Saturday. 30th.

Morning at the Office, engaged in writing and also reading a little of Starkie on the law of Evidence. The weather cold and unpleasant. In the afternoon, reading Clarendon in which I am not so much interested in this portion, but on the whole it is a noble history. There is a high strain of eloquence, and of just feeling moving through it that makes one regret that he was not able to direct more fully the distracted councils of the king. In the evening I remained at home through idleness.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0005-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-05-31

Sunday 31st.

Morning cloudy but not unpleasant. I rode to Medford and found the family much as usual excepting that it was large. Chardon, Mrs. Everett, Miss Phillips, John Gorham,1 and in the afternoon, Sidney and his wife, who have just arrived from New York. The afternoon turned off cold. I am never so fond of Medford when so many of the family are there, as I am thereby compelled to see less of Abby. But I had a very pleasant evening and on the whole felt well satisfied.
1. John Gorham was a brother of Abigail Brooks’ friend Julia Gorham (CFA, Diary, 24 Oct. 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-01

Monday June 1st.

Morning cloudy and very cold. I rode into town from Medford early and found the want of some clothing considerable. My Summer dress annoyed me almost as much as the winter dress the other day. At the Office, engaged all the morning. Abby Adams sent in a letter to me which she had received from my Mother.1 This letter stated that they should leave Washington on this day, and requested her to make some necessary preparations. I accordingly thought proper to ride to Quincy after dinner and see her about it. I also went to the House to see what portion of furniture might be immediately put in use. The { 384 } sight of the old house and its condition made me sick. I felt disgust at it’s extremely dismal appearance. And my father’s singular character makes it almost hopeless to look for better things. The Nursery looks miserably and every thing bears powerful marks of utter want of attention. After taking tea at my Uncle’s, and on the whole getting through much better than I expected, I returned to town quite late. I can imagine nothing more miserably planned than this design of my father’s, and I really feel thankful that circumstances have rendered me so independent of it.
1. Both letters missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-02

Tuesday 2nd.

Morning at the Office. Weather cold and chilly. After writing a portion of my Index, a labour in itself rather useless but which I intend shall supersede the body of my old Journals and Diaries which contain follies, I was then proud of, but which now would make me ashamed. I wish to keep a softened memory of them as I think there is nothing disgraceful in it. For I was in the fever of youth and health, and never committed any action which made me feel as if I was degrading myself. It was the mere impulse of life and high spirits which are gone now and will probably never return. I am sobered down.
I went to my brother George’s room and looked over his papers again to see if I could find a list of things at Quincy, which I did. This occupied the morning. In the afternoon I read Clarendon which again became interesting, in the account of Charles the 2nd’s escape from the Battle of Worcester. No letters from home. Evening, a pleasant walk.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-03

Wednesday 3rd.

Morning at the Office, occupied much as usual, in writing and reading the law of Evidence. Little or nothing occurred to interrupt my regular avocations. In the afternoon, engaged with Clarendon in exile. The day passed satisfactorily on the whole, and I was again encouraged by having a little case to undertake. The melancholy of last month and the bustle of moving put my law for a time out of my head, and even now Clients seem to me not likely to come. Evening, walk in the rain. No letters, which makes me more distrust the information of the other day.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-04

Thursday. 4th.

Morning at the Office. Weather again warm and pleasant. I was { 385 } tempted foolishly to day to go down to an Auction and the consequence was that I purchased more than in the state of my funds I should have done. Thus the greater part of the morning was spent. On my return to my Office I found Mr. Brooks had called for me, and I went to Medford with him. But I did not enjoy myself quite as much as usual, on many accounts. Mrs. Brooks was absent, on a little journey. Henry arrived at home.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-05

Friday 5th.

Returned to town this morning with Mr. Brooks. Found a letter at last, from my Mother, but containing little or no information of a satisfactory nature. She says my father has had a sharp bilious attack and the Journey is postponed, making some intimation of a change of plans and destination which is perfectly incomprehensible to me. I regret very much this state of things and wish earnestly I had nothing to do with it but I cannot avoid feeling some interest in their plans though perfectly ignorant of them. Time will show. Morning in some measure wasted, which will never do. I must set about reform. Afternoon, Clarendon, and Hume, together with a half hour of the Memoirs of Grammont which is considered so amusing.1 Evening, a visit to Miss Welsh by request in which she was very officious. This is in a great degree her difficulty.
1. CFA’s copy of Mémoires de la vie du comte de Grammont, Rotterdam, 1716, is in the Stone Library.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-06

Saturday. 6th.

Morning at the Office. Engaged in writing as usual. I did not reform this morning, but passed it nearly all in reading the Memoirs of Grammont, very witty but very licentious. J. Eckley1 called upon me this morning and gave me notice that he had left the room above mine in this building and he paid me to the date for the rent. He seemed to think that George had thought of his fate some time and told me an anecdote of his [Eckley’s] insisting upon a receipt at the last Quarter which he had not done usually. It turned out luckily this time. But I do not think his idea has any foundation. That he [GWA] was in circumstances, where death or great trouble of mind were alternatives is however certain. This is a question which now can be explained by no human power, but my own impressions are derived from a careful perusal of his papers wherein nothing of the kind seems apparent. On the contrary, many references to the future. He was in the habit of committing the feeling of the moment so { 386 } much to paper, that I cannot help thinking this notion would now and then casually escape him.
I went to Medford with Mr. Brooks, to keep Abby Company as I thought she was alone, but I found Mrs. Brooks and the family had returned from their short excursion, not in the best condition. But I enjoyed myself very much.
1. Joseph Eckley, of 23 Court Street (Boston Directory, 1828).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-07

Sunday. 7th.

The day which commenced with clouds and a little rain cleared off remarkably fine. I attended Divine Service all day and heard Dr. Richmond1 preach two Sermons of a very quiet, peaceable kind. He also dined with us. He is a clever man. Little of any remarkable kind happened. I was on the whole very happy. Although now my feelings are not altogether free from care, yet it is not sufficient to deprive me of any enjoyment, and my situation sometimes makes me feel melancholy from the idea that it is only a little too happy. That I am hardly deserving of so much and such long continued favour. My life has been hitherto for the most part an unclouded one. My troubles have been caused by myself and in reviewing the past, I cannot help being a little surprised to notice how many false notions, occasioned most generally by excessive prosperity, have led me astray, and have caused a penance often more severe in appearance than the original offence, but the lessons have not been useless as I hope. For they have been much reflected upon.
1. Abel Richmond, the Congregational minister at Halifax, in Plymouth county (Mass. Register, 1827, p. 112).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-08

Monday 8th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks, weather showery but quite mild. Arrived at the Office, and found a letter from my father giving me some more definite information in regard to the future.1 I am therefore now inclined to think there is some probability that they may come on Saturday. My morning was wasted. I spent much time in writing my Index, this part of which I am anxious to conclude. Thos. O. Brackett called upon me on the subject of a Note due by my brother to him,2 to inquire if any arrangement had been made to meet it. I told him, I was in expectation that my father would soon be here when I would see about it. Also Josiah Quincy who came to make some inquiries, regarding some busts which have { 387 } arrived for my father, which I am unable to give any directions about. He informed me of the engagement of my cousin Elizabeth C. Adams to Mr. John M. Gourgas of Quincy,3 which at first I doubted, but hearing it afterwards confirmed, I was very glad of it. The match is respectable. After dinner, I finished the History of Clarendon, which has given me much pleasure. I like the style and the sentiment generally, though subject to exception. Evening, rain, at home.
1. JQA announced that he and LCA were leaving Washington on 8 June and expected to arrive in Quincy on 13 June. “On returning to Quincy,” he added, “I propose giving as much attention to my own Affairs, as I can; and they will require a great deal” (JQA to CFA, 3 June 1829, Adams Papers).
2. Thomas O. Brackett was a messenger at the Traders’ Bank (Boston Directory, 1833). See entry for 23 July, below.
3. John M. Gourgas Jr. was a lawyer and a justice of the peace in Quincy (JQA, Diary, 18 June 1829; Mass. Register, 1832, p. 83). However, Elizabeth Coombs Adams never married.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-09

Tuesday 9th.

Morning at the Office but did not remain there for I passed a part of it in the Supreme Court and the remainder at Auction. I purchased some books very low but few for which I cared any thing. The sale was stopped on account of the sacrifice made upon the books. After dinner, I went to see the paintings in the Gallery of the Athenaeum. They did not strike me very much excepting Trumbull’s Sortie at Gibraltar, and a few of the Landscapes. From thence, not having seen Mr. Jones about the Paintings as my father directed,1 which was my principal object, I went to Dr. Welsh’s to take a measure of the bed for a bedstead and to look out the keys of the Quincy Trunks. Having done this, I then went to take a cold bath at the Western Avenue. The water was cold and it was not altogether pleasant. Evening at home. My mind perplexed.
1. JQA asked CFA to see William Harris Jones, an artist who lived at 141 Washington Street, about cleaning some paintings (JQA to CFA, 3 June 1829, Adams Papers; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-10

Wednesday. 10th.

Morning at the Office and in the Supreme Court. I employed myself as much as I could in writing and was surprised to find Mr. Brooks with an Invitation to me to go out to Medford. This disappointed all my plans for the day but thinking that the arrangement would be best on the whole I consented. The weather was very cold, owing to one of our very Easterly winds. Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham dined there. Mrs. Brooks looks quite sick. Evening as usual. Pleasant enough.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-11

Thursday 11th.

Returned to town early with Mr. Brooks. Found no later information from my father which leads me to conclude that he has actually started. The morning was occupied in going about making the few purchases which I consider as necessary for my Mother and in which I much feared I exceeded what I ought. The looseness of the present arrangement is one of the amusing things of the present time. My father seems to have an idea that every thing is to come right by magic. My mind has been much troubled about these things. The weather cold for the Season. Evening, a pleasant walk on the Common. One of my father’s tenants called about his house. I could give him no assistance.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-12

Friday. 12th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. I listened to rather a dull argument this day. Richardson came in and chatted for half an hour. I then returned to the Office to read Starkie. In the afternoon I read Clarendon’s State of Ireland.1 It seems to be in the nature of a defence of the particular conduct of the Duke of Ormond, and is without interest. Received a letter from John,2 intimating that all their arrangements are changed and that my Mother will remain at Washington and that only he and my father will come. This is a most unexpected and I must add bitter disappointment. I could not digest it directly, and the more my mind reflected upon it the worse I felt. Mr. J. H. Foster called upon me to let me know that my poor brother had been found on City Island off New York. He came to advise me to go on which I declined doing. Evening, a solitary walk on the Common. My mind much taken up and not pleasantly.
1. The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in Ireland, Dublin, 1719–1720, by Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon.
2. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-13

Saturday 13th.

Morning at the Office. Attended Court for a little while but found nothing of any consequence. I therefore returned to my Office and read a portion of Starkie on the Law of Evidence which book has given me some ideas. In the afternoon read the Life of Mahomet just published by the Society for the diffusion of knowledge in England.1 I was not pleased with it. These pamphlets are all made abominably dry. My mind during the whole day was much agitated by the idea of the family at home. A more pitiable set I do not { 389 } think I know than my father and mother, and John’s machinations I can neither admire nor approve of. Poor George once said to me that his only objection to John was that he was so artful and he said true. But this cannot be helped. Where his own interest does not interfere, he is kind and generous. Evening, a solitary walk. Brilliant night.
1. See entry for 2 May 1828, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-14

Sunday 14th.

Not having received any letters from home last night leading me to suppose that my presence would be needed at Quincy today, I decided upon going to Medford and in consequence rode out early. Found the family much as usual. Mrs. Brooks looks very poorly. Mrs. Frothingham and her family and Mrs. Everett were at dinner. Little or nothing occurred of any incident. It was not one of my pleasant days, for my spirits were low and Abby was not in her pleasantest mood though I found nothing to complain of. I sometimes require much soothing, and sometimes receive it in most delightful ways, but this was not one of the days.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-15

Monday. 15th.

Returned to town early this morning and not in very good humour, for Abby was not pleasant as usual though I hardly knew what was to be objected to her. Found a letter from my Mother1 hardly in better humour and positively stating that she should not come on. This was rather trying to me, but this is a season of suffering. I went into Court this morning and heard an argument upon the subject of the Warren Bridge.2 It was interesting because it was short. Afternoon, rather desultory reading, being some Numbers of the Society for the diffusion of knowledge, and a Volume of Scott’s Lives of the Novelists, Richardson and Fielding.3 Evening, received a Newspaper from Baltimore announcing my father’s actual passage through Baltimore on Thursday last. A pleasant though lonely walk.
1. Missing.
2. See entry for 5 Aug. 1828, and note, above.
3. Sir Walter Scott, Lives of the Novelists, 2 vols., Paris, 1825.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-16

Tuesday. 16th.

Morning fine. I arose early and enjoyed the pleasure of the air, in going to take a bath on the Charles river. This early rising in summer is pleasant but it requires an effort to become sensible of it. { 390 } I returned to breakfast feeling fresh and cool. At the Office, attended Court and heard the commencement of an argument in the case of the heirs of Hubbard against Mr. Brooks. This case involves a very large amount and charges fraudulent concealments on the part of Mr. Brooks which I regretted exceedingly being present to hear. The nature of the case was entirely unexpected to me and I repented being present as my feelings could not bear it. I shall not go again [even] if the eloquence was ever so tempting. The case strikes me as a very hard and a very unjust suit to obtain money of a rich man upon an obsolete claim.1 In the afternoon, I amused myself with reading Scott’s Lives of Smollet and Cumberland. They are light, airy and superficial like every thing else of his. My father is now in New York. Evening, a walk. A most magnificent night and the panorama of the Common singularly striking.
Poor George has been buried at East Chester with all possible marks of respect.2 I feel now more disposed to look with melancholy upon his fate. Although I cannot come to the conclusion that he would have lived to give us much gratification, yet the peculiarities of his character, the pleasant kindness of his nature, and the light yet ornamental cultivation of his mind have often afforded me moments of great pleasure. He might have been a distinguished man had God granted him firmness of character. He was a lively and pleasant companion, and a kind heart.
1. The case was that of Henry Farnam, administrator for the estate of Tuthill Hubbart, v. Peter C. Brooks (9 Pickering 212). Hubbart and P. C. Brooks were partners in insurance underwriting from 1794 to 1803. When Hubbart died in 1808, Brooks made a settlement with his heirs. Now, after many years, the administrators of the Hubbart estate claimed that the settlement had been fraudulent and brought suit to recover from one to two hundred thousand dollars from Brooks. On 29 March 1830 the court held that Brooks’ original settlement should not be set aside but confirmed, allowing the Hubbart heirs, however, to recover about four thousand dollars due to them because of a mistake in the accounts. See JQA, Diary, 26 June 1829.
2. JQA, on his way from Washington to Quincy, arrived in New York at the time GWA’s body was found. He attended a funeral service for his son at East Chester and then arranged for George’s body to be sent to Quincy in the late autumn. See Bemis, JQA, 2:182–183.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-17

Wednesday. 17th.

Morning fine. I arose early and took a Bath though the water was low and not very pleasant. Then at the Office. Passed some time in writing my Index and then went to Dr. Welsh’s for some books I wanted to read. Conversation with Harriet Welsh. She is a little too officious. I then went and made a call upon Julia Gorham whom I { 391 } have not seen since the death of her father. She looks poorly and seems out of spirits. The remainder of the morning passed in studying law. Starkie on Evidence. In the afternoon, I commenced Bishop Burnet’s History of his own Times,1 as a continuation of Clarendon. Read also some biographies by Scott, of Sterne, Goldsmith, Johnson and Mackenzie. This with a few numbers of the Spectator passed the time. Received a short letter from John2 at New York stating their case, and that they would arrive tomorrow. He is surprised I did not write which is absurd, for I could do nothing without instructions. After tea, I took a walk. Evening cloudy, and I felt unusually fatigued.
1. CFA’s copy of Bishop Gilbert Burnet’s History of His Own Times, 6 vols., Oxford, 1823, is in the Stone Library, along with two other editions of this work. JA’s set, published in London, 1753, 4 vols., is in the Boston Public Library (Catalogue of JA’s Library, p. 39).
2. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-18

Thursday. 18th.

Morning at the Office. Occupied in reading and writing, first my Journal, then Starkie and some Massachusetts Cases on Evidence. The weather quite warm. In the afternoon, as I felt pretty confident that my father had arrived, I concluded upon riding to Quincy at once. Upon reaching it, I found my father and John at the old Mansion where they were about to establish themselves. The house looked poorly but the presence of it’s owner made it seem more cheerful. My father looks pretty well, but he has a manner which I never before saw in him of quiet sadness, in itself really affecting. John seems pretty well and in tolerable spirits. I had much conversation with them upon various subjects. George’s affairs more especially which must directly be attended to. The arrangements are that I shall go to Quincy and that we shall live there keeping Bachelor’s Hall. Louisa Smith to take care of the House. Evening, return to town, bright moonlight and pleasant ride.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-19

Friday 19th.

Morning at the Office. Wrote my Journal and copied a portion of my Index but was much occupied all day. Richardson called in and spent an hour with me. Mr. H. H. Tuckerman called to offer to my father ten shares in the Boylston Market.1 Hollis, the housewright called and I instituted a commencement for a settlement in regard to the Common Street Houses. My father proposes to look into these affairs pretty thoroughly. Mr. Hovey, the Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk,2 { 392 } called about an execution against Jacob George, no settlement. I then went to Dr. Welsh’s and got some Keys for Quincy. This took up nearly all the morning. I then made some purchases, and after dinner again rode to Quincy. Found my father not very well. The afternoon and evening were passed in desultory conversation. My father opened the subject of George and Dr. Storer’s letter.3 I conversed freely with him and relieved his mind much. Then into town which I reached shortly after ten.
1. Henry H. Tuckerman, a merchant, lived at 44 Chesnut Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830). The Boylston Market, at the corner of Boylston and Washington streets, had been designed in 1810 by Charles Bulfinch (Whitehill, Boston: A Topographical History, p. 69).
2. John Hovey, of Roxbury (Mass. Register, 1828, p. 245).
3. The letter from Dr. David Humphreys Storer, who lived at 298 Washington Street, is missing. Apparently he presented a bill for his medical services to Eliza Dolph. See entries of 13 and 28 May, above, and 16 July, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-20

Saturday 20th.

Morning at the Office a short time, and engaged for the remainder in making purchases at the different places in town. This occupied me much. My purchases were very generally rather of ordinary Articles, but fit for upper rooms in the old house. They match well with that ancient place. I obtained the Chests which my father had deposited some time since in the Bank.1 But I was some time delayed. After much labour and exertion I finished all my duties and felt glad to be relieved from the labour. After passing an hour of the afternoon in arranging my brother’s papers a little, I rode to Medford to see Abby whom I had not seen before for a week. We passed the afternoon and evening much as usual. When one is pleased there is little to say about it. Made a short call at Mrs. Frothingham’s new house.2
1. The five chests contained books (JQA, Diary, 20 June 1829).
2. At 43 Summer Street (Boston Directory, 1831–1832).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-21

Sunday. 21st.

Fine morning after a smart thunder shower. Attended divine service in the morning and heard a certain Mr. Robinson preach a very dull Sermon upon natural religion.1 He gave me however one new idea, though I doubt exceedingly it’s being original with him. The house seemed exceedingly dull, as Mr. Brooks had gone to town on his law case which was still pending and troublesome,2 and Mrs. B. was unwell upstairs. She dined below however and seemed better. In the afternoon, Abby went with me to Mrs. Everett’s to take tea. Found her and Lydia Phillips alive and well. The former amused me with { 393 } a letter of Mr. Everett’s, which she had just received. She seemed in exceedingly high spirits upon the occasion. After taking tea, we returned and found several people had been up to inquire about Mr. Brooks, his absence being wonderful at Church.
1. Charles Robinson, the Congregational minister at Groton (Mass. Register, 1828, p. 114).
2. See entry for 16 June, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-22

Monday. 22nd.

Morning, returned to town with Abby, leaving her at Mrs. Dehon’s. I went to the Office. Morning occupied in attending to George’s and my father’s affairs. I went to the Probate Court and applied for Administration upon George’s affairs, which was granted, and a bond made by which I as principal and my father and John as sureties, are bound in the sum of eight thousand dollars to make all the necessary arrangements for the due settlement of his affairs. John came to the Office and sat with me for some time. I conversed a little with him upon my mother’s detention though I saw so clearly that we were at odds upon that point, I did not like to risk much conversation. Ordered some wine for my father at Dennie’s.1 This took the morning. Afternoon passed in making out my Accounts with my father. Then rode to Quincy. Found Judge Hall and Mr. John Welles here and my father out, which I regretted. They remained but a short time. In the evening, conversation with my father upon business. He proposes to constitute me his agent in Boston. This is a trust I undertake in order to benefit myself. It may be the means of giving me some business in my profession.
1. Thomas Dennie & Son, wine merchants, at 105 State Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-23

Tuesday. 23rd.

Rode to town and went to the Office. Engaged the larger part of the morning in arranging my brother’s and putting my father’s Accounts in some order. Copied the papers relating to administration upon my brother’s estate and made some purchases for the family at Quincy. Afternoon passed in packing up my Clothes at Mrs. Tarbell’s, which I leave today. This took pretty nearly all my available time. I then rode to Quincy with a new horse which pleased me very much. Had much conversation with my father in relation to his prospects in regard to his property. He was very communicative upon the subject of his intentions.1 I hardly know what opinion to form in { 394 } regard to them, but as I feel it to be my duty to make some representation in regard to it, and to follow up a decided course to assist him, I wish as clearly as possible to comprehend his designs.
1. JQA s record of the conversation disclosed more of his intentions. He made CFA his Boston agent because of his desire “that one of my sons at least should settle in this place of my nativity.” “My first object,” he added, “is to place my property in such a state that I may live with my family without encroaching upon my capital. The next is to build a house here in which my Library, my own manuscript books and papers and those of my father may be deposited” (JQA, Diary, 23 June 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-24

Wednesday 24th.

Morning, rode to town. Engaged busily all the morning in business belonging to my father’s estate or my brother’s affairs, so that I can hardly be said to have had any for my own. The larger part of the time was occupied in going to the various tenants and making inquiries in regard to the state of the rents. I find them all sadly backward. George, poor fellow, was not fit for the situation, he understood little of business and was not pleased with that. Money was to him, an article which was useful in life without his ever knowing how he might obtain it. His qualities which made him so agreeable a companion, were the ones which incapacitated him for the purposes of active life. In the afternoon, I went to No. 47 Chesnut Street to look at some Furniture which was to be sold tomorrow, some of which is wanted at Quincy. John came to town for the like purpose and I met him at my Office just as it was time for me to go to Medford. Rode to Medford and found Abby as usual. Afternoon and evening agreeable though I was exceedingly fatigued. Mrs. Brooks looks badly.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-25

Thursday. 25th.

Morning, return to town. Attended the Sale of the Furniture of [Messrs.?] Clark and Dunn and purchased some things which were bargains, others not so much so, the usual luck at Auctions.1 This and the arrangements necessary to remove them took me all the morning and a portion of the afternoon. The rest was occupied in making up agency accounts, and my administration papers. The trial of the case of Farnum vs Brooks concluded today and peace and order will be again restored to the good city of Boston.2 Returned to Quincy and passed the evening in conversation with my father, principally the Controversy3 upon which he still feels sore.
1. Coolidge & Haskell, auctioneers, announced an assignee’s sale of “Genteel Furniture” at 47 Chesnut Street, the home of John Clark, a dry goods mer• { 395 } chant (Boston Daily Advertiser, 25 June 1829; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
2. See entry for 16 June, and note, above.
3. JQA’s disagreement with the “thirteen confederates.” See entries for 7 and 25 Feb., above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-26

Friday 26th.

Rode to town this morning as usual. Occupied all the morning at the Office in examination of my brother’s affairs. I can hardly define what I did, but this is certain, that I was very busy all day. My mind is however as yet so distracted with the multiplicity of my occupations that I am not so much in advance as I wished. Many persons called upon me for payments of money which I made and on the whole advanced pretty rapidly. I rode out of town and spent the evening in conversation with my father. Mr. Brooks’ law case.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-27

Saturday 27th.

John and I rode into town this morning and I was busy during the day as usual. I arranged and brought up more fully my brother’s books, and then went and made inquiries at the different places in regard to the steps now proper to take. Then attended a sale of stocks for my father and got Mr. Cruft to purchase eighteen shares of the New England Marine Insurance at three per cent advance, to replace an investment of United States 6 per Cent stock which is to be paid off on the first of July. This done, consumed the morning, I dined at the Exchange with John and afterwards, he and I rode to Winter Hill to see Mrs. Everett and Abby, and to take tea. They both seemed well and in good spirits. Returned at seven and after waiting for John to go marketing and getting the Mail at my Office, we rode to Quincy. Reached there by nine, took Supper and had some conversation with my father upon my prospects.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-28

Sunday. 28th.

Morning at Quincy as Abby remained at Winter Hill to preserve Mrs. Everett from loneliness. Attended divine service in the Church and heard Dr. Lowell preach a Sermon upon providence, rather against his text.1 Caught in the rain on my return. Wrote a long letter to my Mother upon miscellaneous family subjects2 and in the evening conversed with my father. Subject, economy in human affairs.
1. Charles Lowell, Harvard 1800, was Congregational minister of the West Church on Lynde Street, Boston (Mass. Register, 1828, p. 111).
2. CFA begged his mother to disregard the advice of JA2 and to return to Quincy in time for his marriage. “Should you be absent from my wedding,” he { 396 } pleaded, “it would lose half it’s pleasure.” The death of GWA, he felt, left him no choice but to remain permanently in Massachusetts, as the only son who could carry on the family tradition. “I will never desert the State which has sustained us,” he pledged. “I am now wedded to the soil. Nothing shall take me from it” (CFA to LCA, 28 June 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-29

Monday 29th.

Morning to town. The weather showery and unpleasant. Engaged all the morning in duties incident to my new situation as manager of my father’s affairs. I went to the Bank and to see Mr. Brown and arranged as to the purchase of forty three shares of stock of the New England Marine Insurance Company by the sale of so much six per Cent Stock of the United States. Then obtained a power of attorney to effect the transfer. This being over, I went to West Boston Bridge to make some inquiries in regard to that stock without success. Stopped at Dr. Welsh’s for some articles for my father. The afternoon was busily engaged in drawing up papers relating to my administration account and also the agency. This detained me until seven when I returned to Quincy. Evening, Conversation.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-30

Tuesday 30th.

Morning to town, weather rainy and disagreeable. Engaged in writing for my father’s affairs with a short Note to Abby.1 Obtained a blonde lace Veil to present to her upon the occasion of her marriage. This is a little extravagant but I could not avoid it. Then to Hancock Street to take a list of my poor brother’s Clothes. Conversation with Harriet Welsh. She is a little too inquisitive. Dined at the Exchange where I met Genl. Wool. He is too precise by half. Afternoon. Engaged in making out a Catalogue of my brothers Law books. Returned to Quincy in the rain. Conversation with my father. His plans.
1. Missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-01

Wednesday. July 1st.

Morning to town with John, weather extremely rainy and unpleasant. I was occupied almost all day in obtaining some money for my father, which was paid off by the United States, and then investing it in forty three shares of the New England Marine Insurance Company the certificate of which I obtained, and thus by putting my father’s money at once upon interest, preventing his parting with it in a less advantageous manner. Dined with John at the Exchange and after dinner, went up to look at the house destined for me, which I was obliged to do twice as I could not the first time find the Carpenter { 397 } who is to measure my shelves. He at last came and I finished that business. Returned to Quincy the weather clearing off cold. Found there a man who came upon a visit to my father. Curiosity. He was a common Countryman apparently disordered in his intellect, for he gave us some amusing specimens of moderate madness.1 Evening, conversation with my father.
1. The man’s name was Layton (JQA, Diary, 1 July 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-02

Thursday. 2nd.

Morning to town weather cool but clear. Received a Note from Abby with a long dissertation upon my present which she wants to refuse, a thing I cannot possibly hear of. I answered it forthwith.1 Then to Dr. Welsh’s to obtain some of my Grandfather’s papers which George had. Stopped at Concert Hall to overlook the packing of some things which are purchased for the House at Quincy. My time was thus almost entirely taken up during the morning, and the afternoon was spent in finishing the list of my brother’s Law Books which was done. I then rode to Quincy. Found there Mr. Degrand, who passed the evening.
1. Both Abigail’s note and CFA’s reply are missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-03

Friday 3rd.

Morning to town. Occupied as usual. Met Allyne Otis and had some conversation with him, though I felt rather distant. He has grown affected and silly. Received a note from Abby1 asking me to come tomorrow to which I was obliged to say no, as I do not wish to be in the midst of the bustle tomorrow. Mr. D. L. Child called upon me to make some inquiries relative to my late brother’s military accoutrements which he wishes to take. As I hope to get rid of them favourably in this manner, I consented to his trying them though they have not been appraized. I then went to Front Street to see a Mr. Carey, a maker of Tablets,2 but I had my walk for nothing, as I could not find him. In the afternoon, at Dr. Welsh’s, examining my brother’s papers, and taking some to Quincy. I left town this evening, earlier than usual. Evening conversation with my father.
1. Missing.
2. Alpheus Cary and Davis Dickinson were stonecutters, with a shop on Front Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-04

Saturday 4th.

This is the Anniversary of our Independence and therefore a public { 398 } day. I am not fond of noise and bustle, therefore prefer a quiet residence at home. I had this morning much conversation with my father upon the prospects of the family. John has decided to desert the State, poor George is now no more, and I am the only one who remains to keep the name and the family on our branch at least from destruction. This result I have never before suspected and it presents to me most perplexing circumstances. My own peculiar situation renders the thing trying, because I feel fully aware how slender is my dependence upon life and hope. I have trusted not without bountiful mercy being bestowed upon me, in an all seeing Divinity who can search and guide the ways of man when his own judgment and power is but a bubble. I will do my best and place my reliance for other help upon a higher power.
After an earnest conversation, we walked up to my Uncle’s, there to make some arrangements if possible in regard to the little shares of property belonging to the two girls who are now of age.1 I am anxious to fix it upon them so as to remain a permanent fund bearing interest all their lives. So that they can have no control over the principal either themselves or by their husbands, when they have them. But I am afraid my good project will not succeed. Women seldom feel the value of certain independence. On our return, we crossed over a part of the Farm, the boundaries of which my father appears to be anxious that I should know. How little did I ever think that this would be my lot. Degrand dined here and talked about money. We drank the fourth of July with great spirit. Afternoon quiet. John went to town and did not come out until late.
1. Under JA’s will, his estate, after certain initial deductions, was to be divided into fourteen parts, to be distributed equally to his two sons, his eleven grandchildren, and his niece, Louisa Catherine Smith, daughter of AA’s brother William. TBA’s share and the shares of his children were to be held in trust by the executors, Josiah Quincy and JQA, until the children came of age (Bemis, JQA, 2:111–112). Since TBA’s two surviving daughters, Elizabeth Coombs Adams and Abigail Smith Adams, were now of age, JQA was providing for the transfer of their property to them.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-05

Sunday 5th.

The rain came down with great force during the night and the morning was misty and disagreeable. I attended service at Quincy and heard Mr. Whitney preach a sermon upon integrity in business, good and practical. The remainder of the day was passed in reading Bishop Burnet’s History of the Reformation which is very interesting, though told in rather an old woman’s way.1 This quiet and literary life pleases me much, and I might grow much attached to Quincy { 399 } as it now is, if I did not feel as if I had other more urgent duties to call me from thence. Evening, much literary conversation with my father—The English Writers, and the French biographical Memoirs of the last Century, My Grandfather’s Library, which is exceedingly valuable. John returned late from town.
1. CFA’s copy of Bishop Gilbert Burnet’s The History of the Reformation of the Church of England, 6 vols., Oxford, 1816, is in the Stone Library.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-06

Monday. 6th.

Morning to town. The weather which for the past week has been cold and disagreeable, today promised better. At the Office, occupied in drawing up the requisite papers for the settlement of my brother’s affairs. I have almost completed the Inventory which now wants only the attention of the appraizers. I also settled some bills, as well my father’s as my own. I am afraid if I do not hit upon some clear method, that these two will fall into a little confusion. Dined at the Exchange Ordinary alone which is unpleasant. Afternoon, at Dr. Welsh’s, finishing the Inventory of the Library. Poor Thomas Welsh has decided to go to prison upon his debt to the State Bank, which I regret. Returned to Quincy. Evening, Conversation with my father, but without much interest.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-07

Tuesday 7th.

Morning at the Office. A pleasant day and easy ride. Passed the larger part of it in making up the papers of my brother’s affairs, and in little transactions of various kinds which require much time though I can give but little account of them. I have little or nothing particular to state just at present as in this way only can my engagements be accounted for. Called at Mrs. Tarbell’s to make final settlement with her. Then went to Mr. Carey’s, a sculptor in stone, for my father and had some conversation with him upon the subject of a tablet which he designs having made for my Grandfather in Quincy Meeting house.1 Returned to Quincy. Evening, my father seemed slightly dull. Conversation, Dr. Watkins’ case, public peculations.2
1. For JQA’s inscriptions on the memorial tablet to JA and AA on the interior wall of the church at Quincy, see Bemis, JQA, 2:125.
2. JQA’s old friend, Tobias Watkins, whom President Jackson had removed from his post as Fourth Auditor in the Treasury Department, was convicted of having embezzled funds remitted by navy agents. JQA thought that politics motivated the prosecution (JQA, Memoirs, 8:116, 141, 151, 290).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-08

Wednesday 8th.

Morning to town. Occupied all the morning in sundry duties as { 400 } usual. I went to see about the bust of my Grandfather which is at a store on India Wharf.1 I found it safe there and had some conversation with Mr. Cruft about it. Nothing yet from Mr. Everett and so I do not see Abby. Afternoon passed in making a separation of my books from George’s which much incumber me. Tomorrow I propose to go over with the appraisement and get through as fast as possible with it. I also ordered my bookcases for my room in our proposed habitation. Returned to Quincy early and passed the evening pleasantly with my father. Conversation, Painting and Sculpture.
1. This was Horatio Greenough’s bust of JA, executed in Italy. It surmounts the memorial tablet to JA and AA in Quincy’s First Church. Tablet and bust are illustrated in Daniel Munro Wilson, The “Chappel of Ease” and Church of Statesmen . . . [Quincy], 1890, facing p. 103.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-09

Thursday 9th.

Morning to town. Engaged all the morning in an appraisement of the Books belonging to my late brother,1 which were got through with so far as they were at the Office before dinner. The afternoon was passed in copying out the Inventory. So that I had fairly but little leisure to attend to any thing else. This employment of my time is hardly satisfactory to me, for I have ends of my own in life to answer. Out of town in the evening. Many visitors, Mr. Beale, Mr. and Mrs. J. Greenleaf, Mr. C. Foster and his sister. Conversation with my father, Mr. Boylston’s affairs.
1. GWA’s library was worth about $2500, but in 1828 JQA had bought it from him for $2000 so that GWA could pay his debts. The books, however, remained in GWA’s hands as his father’s “agent” (Bemis, JQA, 2:178).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-10

Friday 10th.

My brother rode to town with me this morning as he takes leave of us for Washington again. At the office, but owing to the circumstance that the Common Pleas did not meet as I expected, I had a little leisure time. Received a letter from my Mother in rather low spirits,1 which pained me so much. I felt obliged to make an immediate reply.2 I wrote my letter just before dinner. Dr. Lewis3 called and paid me one Quarter’s rent upon the House in Common Street. Dined at the Exchange Coffee House with John. Met there Mr. Fletcher who was very civil to me. I think he has a good opinion of me. I certainly think well of him. After dinner, went to Dr. Welsh’s and met the appraisers, first calling upon Miss Oliver4 and obtaining one quarter’s rent from her, which on the whole made a pretty good day. The afternoon was warm and the appraisal of the books was { 401 } exceedingly tiresome. It took up the whole afternoon until seven o’clock so that I had very little time to take leave of John and go to Quincy. My father and Louisa Smith went down to Mr. Greenleafs to tea but I felt so fatigued, I wished to go to bed immediately. John’s departure materially increases my cares.
1. “My children have alas to reproach me for a too earnest desire to promote their exertions,” LCA grieved, “. . . and my heart tells me that perhaps I urged your unfortunate brother beyond his strength to exertion foreign to his nature. If so may God Almighty forgive the mistaken zeal of an offending mortal” (LCA to CFA, 5 July 1829, Adams Papers).
2. CFA urged his mother to stop her “tormenting and unnecessary pain of unmerited self reproach.” “If I felt disposed to regret what I cannot now amend,” he added, “I might now charge myself as you do with having been the cause of the result. For my letter [see entry for 13 April, and note, above] occasioned yours which invited him. But . . . my wishes proceeded from the very best intentions. ... I have nothing to charge my conscience with” (CFA to LCA, 10 July 1829, Adams Papers).
3. Dr. Winslow Lewis Jr. lived on Tremont (often called Common) Street, at the corner of Boylston Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
4. Presumably a relative of Rev. Daniel Oliver, who lived in one of JQA’s houses on Hancock Street (CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 7, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-11

Saturday 11th.

Morning to town. At the Office. Deposited Miss Oliver’s money, and then met the Appraisers again and went through with all the remainder of poor George’s things. This took up much time, the remainder until four o’clock was passed in copying out the appraisement which is long and tedious. I then went to Medford and found Abby after so long an absence. The time was pleasantly passed. Sidney Brooks and his wife out here with Mr. Frothingham making on the whole a large family.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-12

Sunday 12th.

At home all day. Ennuyé un peu. Too many people here. I cannot somehow or other get along pleasantly, and why, it is inconceivable to me unless perhaps that the manners are too noisy for my modest diffidence. I am unable to make that stir which others do. Sidney and his wife, Mr. Everett and his wife, Mr. Frothingham and his wife, and Mr. Briggs, the Minister who preached,1 were the persons who were here during the course of the day but they all left before evening, which I passed as usual with Abby. I am a little surprised to hear of the dissolution of the engagement of Allyne Otis with Miss Lenox. But from what I have heard, it ought not perhaps to astonish me. I was not aware of it, when I met him the other day.
{ 402 } | view
1. Presumably Charles Briggs, the Congregational preacher at Lexington (Mass. Register, 1829, p. 115).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-13

Monday 13th.

Returned to town, accompanied by Mr. Brooks, and the road seemed short but the day was passed busily at my Office in finishing my Inventory, which I succeeded in doing, though at the expence of my dinner. My spirits were somehow or other most unaccountably depressed all day. I could not myself in any degree account for it. Probably however the reaction upon the excitement of last week. My engagements also are exceedingly numerous, and having but little method about them, trouble my mind without my being able to go on more rapidly than I do. I went to Quincy a little earlier in consequence and passed the evening in conversation with my father—poor George’s affairs.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-14

Tuesday. 14th.

Morning to town. Attended Court all the morning. The new Docket was called but I was late for the only case in which I was concerned. This was not a matter of much importance as it happened to be defaulted. But it made me remain in Court nearly all the morning, which need not have been. The remainder of the day was passed in arranging the papers relating to the Agency, drawing up powers to obtain Dividends upon Stock and writing dunning letters to the Tenants. Thus it became time for me to return to Quincy. I have not felt quite so well for two days, owing to an indulgence in fruit: my health is delicate but very good. My doctrine now is that of the Ancient philosopher μηδεν αγαν.1 Evening, a long conversation with my father. Family pride, a strong instance in himself, much exceeding even what I suspected. I feel at times depressed by it, for now the dependance upon me is perfectly prominent. And beyond me, there is little hope, though in my father, that little centers in the person of his Nephew, John Quincy.2
1. Nothing too much.
2. JQA later promised to put his nephew through Exeter to prepare him for Harvard (Bemis, JQA, 2:186).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-15

Wednesday 15th.

Morning to town after copying a number of letters for my father, which detained me until rather late. The weather exceedingly warm. I was compelled to walk to Long Wharf to take some order with respect { 403 } to some Oats for our Horses. The heat and my fatigue rendered me so sleepy and tired that I was not good for any useful purpose during the remainder of the morning. I therefore only read some stupid Anecdotes of Ancient and modern Music. Afternoon, occupied in copying out into my own private book the Account of the Inventory. This occupied me until five when I rode to Watertown to Edward Brooks’, being caught on the road by a violent shower which compelled me to seek shelter on the other side of Cambridge bridge in a shed. Took tea at Watertown where I met Abby as by agreement and Miss Phillips. After tea, rode with Abby to Medford. Evening as usual, but still very warm.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-16

Thursday. 16th.

Morning to town with Abby who went to make visits in no very good humour. It was so warm that I could not much blame her although her father requested it. At the Office, engaged in making up my accounts, and answering sundry letters from Mr. Farmer and Dr. Storer upon my brother’s affairs. There is much to tease and perplex one in this business and the more I progress the more I feel it. Poor fellow, he had wound himself nearly up in his own web.1 Afternoon, engaged in copying out my Inventory further into my own book, and walked up to Hancock Street to decide upon what would be necessary to go to Quincy. This gave me a heat which I did not get over until I was nearly at Quincy. The evening was perfectly lovely, and my father and I sat in the portico until ten, conversation—my Grandfather’s books and papers.
1. To Miles Farmer’s demand for money because he had sheltered Eliza Dolph and GWA’s child (see entries for 13 and 28 May, above), CFA replied on 20 June that he would not be blackmailed. Eliza, he declared, “must work for herself,” but he did “engage that she shall be in no worse situation than she was before this occurrence, so far as demands upon the money she may earn will go” (CFA to Miles Farmer, 20 June 1829, LbC, Adams Papers). As a matter of fact, she shortly went back into domestic service (Farmer-Storer Trial, p. 28).
As to “the unhappy consequence” of GWA’s affair, the infant whose name was never mentioned, CFA promised: “I will make some provision probably similar to what it would be entitled [to] by law” (CFA to Farmer, 20 June 1829, LbC, Adams Papers).
Farmer, CFA went on to say, should feel compensated for his own claims because payment of his considerable debt to GWA would not be pressed (same).
Dissatisfied, Farmer threatened to make “a public statement,” but CFA refused to be bullied. “Whatever I might be disposed to do as Charity . . . ,” he wrote curtly, “I certainly will be forced to do nothing. You are welcome to all the benefit a disclosure will give you.” But in the event of a public scandal, he added pointedly, payment of Farmer’s note to GWA would be demanded (CFA to Farmer, 16 July 1829, LbC, Adams Papers).
Unable to budge CFA, Farmer next tried to extract money from Dr. David { 404 } Humphreys Storer, and the ensuing controversy was tried in Massachusetts courts during 1830 and 1831. Finally, in March 1831, the case was referred to a private hearing before three referees, who awarded Farmer $200 damages. Dissatisfied, Farmer then published his version of the affair in a 44-page pamphlet which attacked both Dr. Storer and the Adams family. See Farmer-Storer Trial (copy in MHi).
CFA, it is clear, thought Dr. Storer almost as great a scoundrel as Farmer. Declaring that the physician was behaving in a way calculated to give “infinite pain,” he refused to have further dealings with him (CFA to Farmer, 20 June 1829, LbC, Adams Papers). Storer’s bill against GWA’s estate he rejected because it did not record the number of times the doctor had attended Eliza (CFA to D. Humphreys Storer, 16 July 1829, LbC, Adams Papers). On 14 October 1829 Storer was paid $37 for his services (CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-17

Friday 17th.

Morning to town. Engaged so much by my father that I got in quite late. I then went to West Boston Bridge to make some inquiries about my father’s Stock there and took the opportunity to refresh myself with a salt water bath which was exceedingly grateful. On my return, I sat down to Accounts. My father’s affairs are not perfectly clear and the deficiency of George is now ascertained to be about one thousand dollars. Rather a heavy loss just at this time. After dinner, I passed the whole afternoon copying out the Inventory and summing up the amount. To Quincy. Found Mr. Brooks and Abby had been out. Visits, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Adams, Mr. and Mrs. Greenleaf, Mrs. Ripley and others. The former cannot get over the old penchant. Manifested as it is, I cannot help feeling myself not a little provoked. But as things are now, we are better prepared to go on than we have been. My father takes deep root and if it was not for the misfortune of my Mother’s condition and feelings, I should never again fear any interference from there. Evening cold and compelled to sit in the House. Conversation, politics, present and future.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-18

Saturday 18th.

Delayed very considerably by my father in order to copy certain letters which he wished me to dispatch. I then rode to town and passed the morning in looking over the accounts and Inventory of my brother’s effects to a final settlement. Mr. Joshua Coffin, a Client of mine1 called upon me to inform me that he could not pay me today, which is the universal cry. Boston is and has been in great distress, the pressure has been very great all round and it is difficult to collect debts for others or for one’s self.
At two, my father called and I drove his carriage to Medford to { 405 } dine there. The Brooks family and Mr. Stetson composed the Company. The dinner was therefore large—Chardon, his wife and Mrs. Everett being the only absentees. It was also pleasant, more so than any I have had for my recollection of [others?] was so little agreeable that I felt glad that during the last year I had been excepted. They were to me immense bores and ever since last winter when we silently came to an understanding about that, I have enjoyed myself infinitely more. But after dinner, I was suddenly seized with a violent pain apparently in the Kidney so far as I could judge from the effect it produced upon my urine. I felt alarmed for I have had some slight apprehensions of the gravel already. It made me sober for the remainder of the day. I felt in no humour to entertain a large panel of Company who came in the evening and so after only bowing to Miss Davis of New York and recognizing Mrs. Keating of Philadelphia, I left them to make the best of themselves, and even after they left, Abby complained heavily of my coldness.
1. Joshua Coffin lived in Williams Court (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-19

Sunday 19th.

At home all day. Heavy rain fell in the morning. I did not attend divine service, principally because I was not asked and a little on account of natural indolence. I seized the opportunity of the day however to read the North American Review in the last Number, some of the Articles of which are good, especially one upon Elocution, which gratified me extremely.1 The tone and spirit of this article are better than those which we find in general in this publication which has been tamed down to the most stupid of milk and water. In the evening with Abby. Some Company came and among others, two Mr. Angiers,2 who sang a few simple songs tolerably well. They are apparently very well satisfied with their style and probably will remain so until they learn a better [one].
1. Orville Dewey’s “Principles of Elocution,” North American Review, 54:38–66 (July 1829).
2. John and Luther Angier (Brooks, Medford, p. 501).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-20

Monday 20th.

Morning to town with Mr. Brooks and Abby. The day was misty and damp, the wind being east, but it cleared off pleasantly before night. I was busy at the Office during the morning. Thomas B. Adams called in and passed some time with me. He has just arrived having been at New York long enough to alarm his family considerably.1 In { 406 } consideration of this, I thought I would take him to Quincy early. I succeeded however in getting through with and returning my Inventory of George’s effects to the Probate Court and the Appraisal so that I have that off my mind. The next thing will be to remove them from their present situation. I do not know how that will go. Rode out of town at four and reached Quincy shortly after five, just as my father was about taking a ride. I went with him to Mount Wollaston and had a pleasant conversation upon the beauty of the Country which did shine forth on this afternoon with great brilliancy. Family pride does strongly centre in him now. It has become an absorbing passion. Evening, Conversation—Economy.
1. JQA obtained a furlough for his nephew from his army station at Fort Pickens, South Carolina, and the young man spent much of the summer aiding JQA (Bemis, JQA, 2:186).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-21

Tuesday 21st.

Morning to town. Occupied first in going to Hancock Street to see about the sale of Mr. Welsh’s property. Finding nothing there, I went to another sale of certain furniture in Chesnut Street and there made a purchase for Quincy. This took up much of the morning. I forgot to say that I drove Abby Adams to town, a fact not in itself of much importance. On my return to my Office, I passed a good hour in making a settlement with Daniel Hollis, one of the tenants of my father’s houses. His account has been moving on ever since the year 1824 and exceeds in amount six hundred dollars while our Account against him for the same time exceeds that. I struck the balance and took his Note for the amount over. The afternoon was passed lazily as I was fatigued, excepting that I went to get my Astral Lamp1 and in order to be sure of it’s safety I carried the Glass myself. This was not elegant but I have become careless of those appearances. The same thing gave me a good deal of trouble on my way to Quincy but I at last reached there safe. Evening with my father. Conversation upon the state of property in Boston.
1. A lamp burning oil in a flattened ring, so contrived that uninterrupted light is thrown upon the table below it (OED).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-22

Wednesday. 22nd.

Morning to town, weather exceedingly warm. I went into the Common Pleas for a few moments to look after my case which appears pretty safe. Then to Dr. Welsh’s as I had directed a man to come for Newspapers, in order to have them bound, which will make some number of Volumes. Having got rid of them, I went to Miss Oliver’s, { 407 } a tenant of mine to discuss the matter of repairs and a new Lease all which was done. They take a Lease for two years and I agree to paper and paint their rooms, with some other necessary repairs. On the whole, as Rents are falling, I think my bargain a good one. Returned to the Office, wrote a short Note to Abby in reply to one of her’s.1 She wants me to go to Medford tomorrow instead of today as she has her Medford friends, as I suppose a kind of valedictory. I must go, but on the whole I am very glad to get rid of this business so cheap. I have been here now nearly two years and have been exposed as a show at Medford very little. Afternoon, quiet at my room, for once read a little of the Spectator, and some Musical anecdotes, and resumed my Index not touched before since my father arrived. Evening to Quincy. A little fretful and something low spirited. Conversation with my father—Dr. Watkins’ case.
1. Both missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-23

Thursday 23rd.

Morning to town. Occupied during the morning in copying some Executors papers for my father, in making a settlement with T. O. Brackett upon George’s Note for One hundred dollars with interest from the third of March which I paid, then went to Hancock Street where I made my arrangements with Miss Oliver and concluded the lease. Ordered Hollis to make some small repair that was required on it and then went to Mr. Foster’s and ordered a paper for them in this way getting through the business. Mr. Curtis called upon me about the expedition to Weston and I fixed Tuesday for it. This consumed the morning and I then rode to Medford. Found Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham and Miss Mary B. Hall at dinner. Mrs. Brooks is sick, and gets no better. I am distressed for the consequence and Abby was evidently much depressed by it. Evening, a Medford party, a thing highly distressing to me, but I got through with it better than I expected. I forced myself through the form of introduction in many cases and so saved myself the trouble of being a post all the evening. But it was fatiguing and did not pay [for] itself.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-24

Friday 24th.

Returned to town this morning, and passed it as I usually do in the performance of a multiplicity of little things no one of which was of great consequence yet all needing attention. It is quite surprising to perceive how many little duties accumulate upon one without his being sensible of it. In like manner in the afternoon, I was writing to { 408 } all the different individuals connected with my various duties as Agent and Administrator, dunning letters, for money. One agreeable thing however occurred, Mr. Coffin paid me a fee which is the first professional money I have touched since May, though I have done some business since. My head was a little out of order, and I felt nervous. Saw Mr. Kinsman and consulted him about a Note from a man by the name of Williams to my late brother. I have not yet made up my mind whether to prosecute. Rode out of town with Abby Adams. She has passed a few days in Boston and returns with a Cold. Evening at Quincy. Col. Josiah Quincy and his brother in Law Greene1 paid a visit. The latter rather silly. Conversation prosy, and I was so sleepy as to be glad to go to bed.
1. Benjamin Daniel Greene, Harvard 1812, married Margaret Morton Quincy (Edmund Quincy, Josiah Quincy, p. 450). See Adams Genealogy.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-25

Saturday. 25th.

Morning to town but very late. My father first entering into conversation with me upon the subject of my prospects and his own in consequence of my a little disliking the tenor of a certain paragraph in the letter to my Mother which I copied for him this morning.1 He went over much that was said before and without much difference in the facts, excepting that now his determination to build a house is weakened. I told him that with regard to his future intentions, all I desired was to be thought not to have any opinion upon the subject but to leave him to the exercise of his own judgment and discretion. I was in Boston a very short time and did little though I seemed engaged. At one o’clock I rode to Medford. Found there, Mr. and Mrs. Chardon Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. Frothingham and Mrs. Story of Salem.2 Dinner was pleasant enough. Mrs. Brooks quite ill and Abby very low spirited about her. Evening pleasant and quite happy.
1. LCA had objected to her husband’s plan to build a pretentious stone house in Quincy and had urged instead that he construct two frame houses, so that he could leave one to each son and thus root them both in Massachusetts soil. In view of his heavy debts and expenditures, JQA replied, “I shall . . . suspend my purpose of building at all, and instead of dreaming of greatness past or future . . . shall confine my contemplations to the reduction of my expenditures, and the payment of my debts, hoping that my children by their industry and their frugality may be enabled to build frame houses for themselves” (JQA to LCA, 25 July 1829, Adams Papers). When CFA made a copy of the letter for JQA’s letterbooks, he took the quoted passage as a personal affront.
2. Presumably Mrs. Joseph Story, the former Sarah Waldo Wetmore (DAB).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-26

Sunday 26th.

Passed all day at home at Medford. The day pleasant but quite { 409 } cool. I read the remaining Articles of the last Number of the North American Review and also Abbot’s Letters on the condition of Cuba.1 These might be amusing as Letters though they fail to make a book. A Country Clergyman travelling for health with ideas confined very much by former habits and studies has but little power of explaining the resources and manners and disadvantages of foreign countries. He seems to have relished good cheer and kind people and to have met more than usual of each. Conversation with Abby. She inclines to fix the third of September for our marriage, which now rapidly approaches.
1. Abiel Abbot, Letters Written in the Interior of Cuba, Boston, 1829.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-27

Monday 27th.

Returned to town this morning. Passed it in a manner not altogether so useful as I might have done. Called on Mr. Davis at Mr. Webster’s Office and had much conversation with him upon many subjects. He is a pleasant young man. I then went to see if I could make any arrangements by which I might dispose of some of the duplicates and useless books which are among George’s, but I found that I should not be very likely to succeed at private sale. I then went and made a few purchases for my father. The afternoon was passed in making a disposition of George’s papers. All the manuscripts were transported from his room, and many of the books which I incline to sell were separated from the rest. In this manner I shall save a double transportation. He has many useless and some vicious books. I was delayed until late, and reached Quincy late. Evening, my father but little conversation.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-28

Tuesday 28th.

Arose early this morning in order to start with my father for Weston. He having fixed this day to go and see the farm which is there in his possession, and the gift of Mr. Boylston. We called at Mr. Curtis’ for him and arrived at Weston before eleven, it being twenty miles at least. The farm appears in tolerable condition since the tenants undertook it, and though it is pretty much a dead weight upon his hands, all he would wish would be that it did not run him in debt. After going over it and seeing the ordinary condition in which it is, we returned so as to reach Quincy by half past three o’clock. The day was favourable to our horses, it being cloudy and with appearance of rain. Passed an hour in the garden looking at the peach trees, the appearance of { 410 } which is really disheartening. And my father although a fine theorist has not the least practical and useful knowledge in the world. My time is so taken up as to make me unable to attend to it. So the garden is likely to go to ruin. Attempted a little of Bishop Burnet without success. William E. Foster brought his sister out here, Elizabeth,1 who remains on a visit to Louisa C. Smith. Mr. Coggins, a man from West Chester, Pa. called to see the House and my Father. Curiosity, but he seemed unassuming so it pleased me to indulge him. Evening, fatigued and went to bed very early.
1. They were children of James H. Foster (JQA to LCA, 31 July 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-29

Wednesday 29th.

Morning to town, threatening a warm day but without being so. My time was taken up in looking over the papers of my brother and in destroying all those which are of little or no use. He managed to collect and preserve every thing relating to himself from his earliest years and the mass now shows his industry ill regulated as it was. He was a very extraordinary young man, had he possessed but a single quality which I can without much vanity lay claim to, he would have been excelled in life by few. My particular forte in me is of but little use, for I have not his accomplishments to push forward with it.
Having been invited to day to dine with Mr. Everett I went out and found there Mr. Brooks and Abby, Col. Barnard of Rochester1 and Mr. Sparks. The dinner was tolerably pleasant, and Mr. Everett quite easy and agreeable. I should like very well to become a little more acquainted with him. After remaining there until after seven, I drove with Abby to Medford. The Evening passed as usual. Little or nothing remarkable.
1. Daniel Dewey Barnard (1796–1861), a Rochester, N.Y., lawyer who had just served one term in Congress and had been defeated for reelection (DAB).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-30

Thursday. 30th.

Returned to town bringing Abby with me as far as Charlestown. The weather which looked threatening in the morning became more so until we were deluged with torrents of rain. I employed the morning in drawing up my accounts for the month and also in making some disposition of a few loose things which trouble me. I am continually finding such. I got rid of a dunning Note to Mr. Alden Bradford,1 and dispatched a letter to John, enclosing a Note of one Williams who has gone to Baltimore and may be caught there. In { 411 } the afternoon, I went to Hancock Street to see Miss Oliver who sent for me without any definite reason but to beg more repairs, rather unreasonably as I thought, so I left her immediately. Then to Dr. Welsh’s where I was engaged all the rest of the afternoon in making a disposition of George’s books. Then to Quincy. It rained again during the evening. My father seemed dull and out of spirits. He complained of headach, and seemed more discouraged than I have yet seen him.
1. Alden Bradford (1765–1843), Harvard 1786, an historical writer and editor and from 1812 to 1824 Secretary of the Commonwealth, lived at this time on Summer Street (DAB; Boston Directory, 1829–1830). For the consequences of CFA’s letter, see entry for 5 Aug., below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-31

Friday. 31st.

Morning to town in a shower of rain, the weather being exceedingly changeable. It cleared up warm for the rest of the day. Morning passed at the Office in finishing my Account for the month for my father, and in destroying the papers accumulated by my brother. He had always the inclination to preserve and this has placed upon me much trouble for I feel unwilling to commit them without ceremony to the flames. Much of my time is in this way consumed. Afternoon at Dr. Welsh’s where I completed the division between the books I retain and those I intend to try to sell. But I was so fully occupied that I went to Quincy late. Found there, Mr. J. H. Foster Jr., his wife and sister1 who went directly however. Miss Elizabeth and her brother Thomas Adams with Mr. Marston and his son Ward were all at the House in the evening. My father appeared much overcome by the heat. Conversation with him, the advantages and disadvantages of land. He holds to the first, and there we disagree. This led us to a comparison of life in City and Country where we agreed as little. But how natural this is. He is now beyond ambition. I am just arriving at it. Life is therefore seen by us in different phases. It grew cooler in the night.
1. Foster’s sister was named Louisa (JQA, Diary, 31 July 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-01

Saturday. August. 1st.

The weather had changed so much as to affect me sensibly with cold in riding to town this morning. At the Office engaged much. Mr. Clough1 called upon me to tell me that I must apply to Mr. Rayner, the President of the Republican Institution, to call the government together to decide upon my request. I accordingly wrote to Mr. Rayner.2 Then I was engaged in making a Writ, Floyd against Lumee. { 412 } Mr. Brooks called upon me to ask for the Keys of the House. I had them not and was consequently obliged to go and look after them, which carried me first to the House and then to Dr. Welsh’s. Found that my Carpenter had been at work at my room, and had put up my cases. The shelves however hardly tall enough. When I returned to the Office I found only time enough to look over very few of my brother’s papers, before I was obliged to go with my father to Medford. Found there, Mr. and Mrs. Everett and Col. Barnard with the usual family. The dinner was pleasant, indeed unusually so. My father left early but not to escape heavy rain which fell for two hours. Conversation with Abby as to the time of our marriage. She has qualms now and then. Subsequent conversation with Mr. Brooks who professes to be indifferent.
1. Ebenezer Clough, of 254 Hanover Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
2. CFA applied to John Rayner for advice as to how GWA’s “right in the Republican Institution of this City” could best be sold (CFA to John Rayner, 1 Aug. 1829, LbC, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-02

Sunday. 2nd.

Morning at home, engaged in reading the last Number of the Quarterly of Philadelphia.1 Not much interesting matter in it. Conversation with Abby. Reflection upon her character. Impatience predominant. Natural character fine, but the early neglect had fixed roots difficult to eradicate. I see her difficulties strongly and have tried to change them by urging to the extent of her patience. Now I am soon to marry her when this will not do and kindness and affection are all. Much of her character is fascinating and her vivacity, playfulness and affectionate simplicity are delightful characteristics for a companion in life. Mr. Davis of New York was here in the afternoon, lively and amusing. Nothing remarkable otherwise. Mrs. Brooks was uncommonly well today.
1. The American Quarterly Review.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-03

Monday 3rd.

Morning to town with Mrs. Frothingham and Abby in the Carriage. Engaged first in drawing and depositing for my Father the interest on the West Boston and Neponset Bridge Stock. After which I went to the new House and passed there a considerable part of the morning, in fitting the Keys and making preparation for my books. I moved this afternoon all the books from George’s room which I intend to come from there to my house. The weather was very warm and the business { 413 } most excessively fatiguing so that by the close I found myself so accablé as to require a cold bath which I took forthwith and it relieved me exceedingly. But I was nevertheless much fatigued. Rode to Quincy quite late and though my appetite was prodigious owing to my having had no dinner, yet my bones were so wearied that I could not rest very well. My father returned home quite sick on Saturday but seemed well this evening. I retired very early and had no conversation.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-04

Tuesday. 4th.

Morning to town, but before I had reached it a most violent shower came on nearly as bad as that we had a few days since. It was lucky for me that the rain was not in front or behind as I should unquestionably have been thoroughly drenched in such case. As it was I was clear very cheap. On my arrival at my Office however I did not find that my table and room had escaped so easily for my boy by his carelessness had left the windows open in his absence to Dr. Welsh’s. This thing being remedied I employed myself in examining George’s papers which I could not get through though I continued it until I went to Quincy. Weather damp and gloomy. Found my father comfortable and talked with him in the evening about my grandfather and his papers.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-05

Wednesday. 5th.

Morning to town. Occupied a little at the commencement of the day but afterwards my friend Richardson called in and I talked over things with him pretty fully. He comes to see me seldom so that I am glad to have him kill a morning sometimes. Mr. Alden Bradford called in consequence of a letter which I wrote to him some days since to make a settlement about the rent of a pew belonging to my father in Brattle Square. Having no money to give me, he gave a promissory Note. I have some prospect of getting this money now, which was near proving a bad debt. Much money has been lost by George’s total neglect of books and accounts, and I can only pick up here and there a straggling debt which is going on merely by sufferance. At one I went to see Abby who was at the House, staid a little while and returned. Afternoon, George’s papers until five when I rode with Abby to Medford. Mrs. Brooks very sick. Dr. Davis1 and Miss Catherine Dexter there. Evening quiet.
1. Possibly Dr. Edward G. Davis, who lived at 101 Washington Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-06

Thursday. 6th.

Morning to town. Abby in low spirits about her Mother and I could not rouse her. This affected me a little and I felt depressed all day. A letter also came from John1 saying that my Mother had been taken sick, which did not contribute at all to improve my pleasure. Morning passed in the Office and in attending an Auction, to purchase a few of the last things for Quincy. Received from E. H. Derby, one year’s pew rent which I called upon him to obtain. Too much of my day was wasted in reading les Liaisons Dangeureuses, a book nominally with a moral but altogether vicious, in fact. George owned this copy and read by far too much in this and similar works. But the afternoon was occupied in destroying the school boy productions of my brother and his friends which he always preserved. I remained in town until late in order to obtain the evening’s mail, by which there came a letter from my Mother which relieved our apprehensions.2 Then to Quincy. Evening with my father. Miscellaneous conversation.
1. Missing.
2. LCA reported that she was “much better altho still labouring under a considerable stricture of the lungs” (LCA to JQA, 2 Aug. 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-07

Friday. 7th.

Morning to town. Weather quite warm. After spending a short time at the Office, I went up with Baxter, the Waggoner, and assisted him in transporting the remaining Articles of Furniture from the House at Dr. Welsh’s. The Book Cases were rather heavy but we got them down by the assistance of a hand cartman. And at last I saw the end of that business which had been hanging upon my mind heavily for some time. At last George’s room bears no marks of his residence, and in a short time the changes of life will have nearly effaced his memory from the globe. Such is our final existence and such our end. Moralizing ceases to produce it’s effect for the lesson is too extensively spread.
This took up nearly all of my morning so that as I had decided that I would dine at Quincy today, I was compelled to start forthwith, merely asking first how Mrs. Brooks was and found her sick, as ever. My ride was warm but not unpleasant. Found the family at dinner but Louisa C. Smith too unwell to come down. Thomas dined with us. Afterwards, we took a bath, which I enjoyed exceedingly, but found myself much fatigued in the evening. So as not to enjoy my father’s conversation from drowsiness. He was upon the History of America too.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-08

Saturday 8th.

Morning to town. The weather exceedingly warm. At the Office. Received a most extraordinary Note from Mrs. Longhurst with a remittance of fifty dollars. I replied to it promptly and in such manner that her leaving the House now would not surprise me,1 and indeed would it be matter of indifference as I had rather take my chance of a good tenant, who paid punctually, even if I should be compelled to lower the rent. She wishes me to lower the rent for her without paying. Walked to the House and saw Abby. My book cases not yet done. Returned to the Office, engaged in tearing and assorting old papers, until dinner time. Dined at Judge Hall’s. My father, Mr. J. Russel, Col. Hall, Judge, wife and son. Tolerably pleasant. His wine was good. But a thunder storm detained me longer than I wished as the Judge is prosy after dinner, and his lady talks shocking scandal. Rode to Medford in the evening, came in to tea and Dr. Swann. Evening, saw Mrs. Brooks, who has been quite ill, but is better and was lively tonight. Remainder of the evening as usual.
1. Mrs. Mary B. Longhurst, a dressmaker, lived in a house owned by JQA on Tremont Street, at the corner of Boylston Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830). To her request that the rent be reduced, CFA replied: “If you are not disposed to remain in the House, I am perfectly content that you should give me notice to quit after having paid all arrears” (CFA to Mrs. Mary B. Longhurst, 8 Aug. 1829, LbC, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-09

Sunday. 9th.

Morning exceedingly warm and sultry. Remained at home all day and wasted it shockingly. I could regret much this way if I did not hope it was soon to cease. In the afternoon, I read half a Volume of Chesterfield, Letters to his son. They display wonderful knowledge of men and though it is the fashion to decry them, I think they are admirable as instruction. To be sure it will not do to put them into the hands of the very young, but after moral education is complete they are useful, for they only teach to combine the useful and ornamental with the correct, when properly taken, and who would not wish to unite them all. P. Chardon Brooks and his wife out here in the afternoon and Mr. Cotton Brooks of whom I have spoken once or twice heretofore. The weather was warm until evening when there was a violent thunder shower.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-10

Monday 10th.

Morning to town accompanied by Abby. Called in passing upon Mr. Stetson to inquire of whom it would be necessary to obtain a { 416 } certificate after the publishment of the banns. This thing must be done directly. At the Office, my boy out of the way so much that I turned him off, though with regret. At the house saw Abby but my bookcases not finished yet.
Assorted more of George’s letters and in the afternoon, read his letters to Mary C. Hellen during their engagement, which was the flower of his life. Affectionate enough but rather seldom. Written once a month or so when I wrote twice a week to Abby. This was the mistake he made for he suffered her affection, at all times volatile, to become perfectly cool.
Engaged the remainder of the afternoon in putting up my books in their cases. I doubt whether those yet put up will contain one half of them. Thus it was nearly seven before I left town. Evening at Quincy. Conversation with my father. Family affairs. Old History. I forgot to mention that I took order to have myself published in Boston and wrote to Medford to Mr. Bartlett, town Clerk, to do the same.1 Evening cool after a warm day.
1. CFA’s letter to A. Bartlett, town clerk of Medford, is missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-11

Tuesday 11th.

Morning to town, but I find myself so late in reaching it that I am hurried for time very much. My office too already looks as if it wanted a boy. At the house putting my books up, find that I shall need another case which is not an agreeable discovery. I was thus occupied all day until one when I thought I would ride to Quincy to dine. My father had asked several persons to come to dinner, but none came excepting Mr. Curtis. Thomas as usual. The afternoon was passed in a lazy manner. I became so ashamed of it that I caught up a copy of Lady Montagues Letters, and read half the first Volume.1 They are pleasant, though not free from affectation and conceit. Evening, Conversation with my father—General literature, Horace Walpole, Dr. Johnson.
1. Lady Mary Wortley Montague, Letters . . . Written during Her Travels in Europe, Asia and Africa to Persons of Distinction, London, 1763.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-12

Wednesday. 12th.

Morning to town. Having reformed my practice, I got to town quite in reasonable time today. At the Office. Nothing worthy of particular notice. At the house, after having purchased a Carpet for my Study. Discouraged about my books, as I find other cases must be made. The expense frightens me. Found Mrs. P. Chardon Brooks, Miss { 417 } Phillips, Julia Gorham and afterwards Abby. But they did not please me this morning so that I returned to the Office in bad humour. Mr. Orcutt, tenant of tenement No. 3 in Common Street, called to tell me he could not pay any more rent at present.1 This is the general cry. And in the mean time, we must live. The prospect is not agreeable. I did not remain in town long being out of spirits, and returned to Quincy to dine. Found there Dr. Waterhouse of Cambridge who dined with us but was dry. Afternoon, I read a little of Burnet, which I must go over again connectedly, and finished the first Volume of Lady Montague. Mr. Bussy, his grandson in law Francis C. Head,2 and four strangers, citizens of South Carolina, called in the course of the afternoon. Not much conversation in the evening.
1. David Orcutt, a cabinetmaker, rented a house owned by JQA on Tremont (or Common) Street for $150 a year (CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 16, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297).
2. Benjamin Bussey (1757–1842), who had made a fortune in foreign trade, was famous for his horticultural gardens, which were later bequeathed to Harvard as a school of agriculture (Appletons’ Cyclo. Amer. Biog.; Bacon’s Dict. of Boston, p. 74–75). Francis C. Head, who married Eleanor Bussey Davis, was a member of the Boston auctioneering firm of Coolidge, Poor, & Head (Columbian Centinel, 14 May 1825; Boston Directory, 1825).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-13

Thursday. 13th.

Morning to town. Engaged as usual in a diversity of pursuits connected with my father’s business and my own. Called upon Mr. Tarbell about sundry Writs he has intrusted to me and had some conversation with him which induced him to ask me to dinner. After having spent an hour looking at some of poor George’s old Journals, I went and dined with them. Found Mr. Fletcher there, and they were quite comfortable. In the afternoon, went up to the house and completed putting up my books as far as I was able but the bookcases are manifestly insufficient. I must have others made and after all, I must return many to Quincy. It became late before I had finished this business, and after going to the Office to shut up, though I had a boy who was a wretched country gawk. And gave me more trouble than good. I rode to Medford, stopped at the Tavern and walked to Mrs. Ward’s, where there was a Medford party. Stupid enough. She is old and infirm beyond belief. Her daughter was the person giving the entertainment. I felt a little low spirited and not very good company. After an hour and a half of ennui, we were dismissed and I returned to the Tavern, took my horse and rode to Mr. Brooks’.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-14

Friday 14th.

Morning to town. Mr. Frothingham came in with me and we had much conversation upon many subjects, in most of which I found our notions agree considerably. Discussing the character of Mr. Everett, I saw clearly that we both understood his character. But I felt unwilling to go very much into the expression of my opinions. Mr. Everett has been friendly to me, and it is very silly for me to hazard his kindness and turn it into enmity of a most disagreeable description. At the Office. Nothing remarkable. Dismissed my new Office boy in disgust. Up at the house where I wasted an hour pleasantly with Abby, but did nothing. Called to see my Carpenter but could not find him. My bookcase lags. Then to the Office and out of town. Pleasant dinner at home and discussion about Wine in which I found I knew very little about it. Walk into the town to see about certain bottles, but I could not obtain any. My father promises me some fine Madeira if I set about it. Dropped in to see my Uncle Thomas and his family. Spent half an hour there in conversation about immaterial things, obtained a Volume of my set of Voltaire which has been there since last year and returned home to tea. So fatigued this evening that I could not sit up beyond nine o’clock, being another case of overfatigue. My father was interesting too, upon the English Novelists.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-15

Saturday. 15th.

We were visited early this morning with the most severe thunderstorm that I have heard or seen for many years. It was longer and heavier than usual, remaining over us for more than two hours and with incessant flashes of lightning. One house was struck in the town and a fire was visible in the distance. The bell of the Meeting house began to ring and the fury of the storm, the quietness of the Country visible in the strong glare of the light when it poured from the Clouds, with the melancholy but alarming tone of the bell, presented a scene equal to the strongest imagination. I was sleepless for three hours and arose still tired and exhausted. To Boston. Morning at the Office, excepting when I was engaged in a number of commissions given me for the morning, purchasing Carpets and other things for the House at Quincy. Mr. Curtis called upon me, and gave me a deed to draw for the Estate of Mr. Boylston at the same time retaining me as Conveyancer in general which is a good place. Dined in town. Afternoon rather wasted. Why I do not know, but I feel now too much disarranged to do much. To Medford. Found Abby and the family well. { 419 } Pleasant Evening. Abby was affectionate and I enjoyed myself altogether very much.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-16

Sunday. 16th.

Morning at home. As it is the ettiquette for a lady not to go to public places after she is published to be married, Abby did not attend at Meeting and we spent the day together. I was occupied in writing her Invitation Cards for the reception of her company. On the whole, I have seldom enjoyed myself more. She was extremely affectionate and her playful yet perfectly simple manner was fascinating as it was sincere. The day has little else to render it remarkable. In the afternoon, Mr. and Mrs. Everett were here and Edward B. Hall, the Clergyman of Northampton who is a Nephew of Mr. Brooks.1 The former persons have just returned from this place, where they have been for some purposes, no body knows what. Mr. Frothingham truly said yesterday, that he (Mr. E.) never did any thing without a purpose. Evening, Conversation with Abby—Character, warmth of it. We mutually complain of the want of it in each other, which is one of those cases where not much comes of [it?]. Pleasant enough.
1. Edward B. Hall, Harvard 1820, was Congregational minister at Northampton (Mass. Register, 1829, p. 114).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-17

Monday 17th.

Morning to town accompanied by Mr. Frothingham. Conversation upon the late report of an unfortunate affair between Mr. Webster’s eldest son and his niece. I do not know what to make of it. At the Office. Mr. Ayer the Carpenter called1 and I went up to the House with him to see about the remaining bookcase. Waited for Abby who was there. Mrs. Chardon Brooks came in and I went away. Paid a visit to Mrs. Sidney Brooks at Mrs. Dehon’s. Found there many visitors. Upon going out I met Mrs. Harrison G. Otis. She spoke to me, but the meeting was rather awkward. I hardly knew what to do or say. It was rather fortunate however that I had taken my leave, for the meeting upstairs would have been less pleasant. Returned to the Office. Nothing further occurred, and I left town to dine at Quincy. Found there Miss Welsh and Louisa Smith who worries my life out. It is impossible for a woman to be better constituted to fatigue others than she is. Much of the afternoon was passed in reading and studying the deed which I propose to draw for Mr. Curtis. Evening quiet. General conversation upon Astronomy. My father received letters from { 420 } Washington, announcing their probable departure on Sunday which is earlier than was expected.
1. Thomas Ayers, who lived at 23 Chambers Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0018

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-18

Tuesday 18th.

This morning marks my twenty second birth day. Much has passed since the last event of the kind, both for good and for evil. I have suffered and I have enjoyed as is the lot of all mortals in this scene of vicissitudes. Our family has had a year of trouble yet sees much to be thankful for. We have descended into the rank of private citizens without regret and lamentation, but the private troubles have been to us both deep and distressing. There has also been pleasure. My brother John has given my Mother an object of interest in his child and a bond in which all the family are united. We have on the other hand lost a member and the young head of the family. My own feelings have been of a mixed character. The first half of the year brought with it much bitterness, disappointment and ill health but the other half has been rapidly paying me by much happiness unalloyed. To the future I decline looking for as that contains many deep and dark spots, I have no fancy to reflect upon their appearance. Enough of this.
Rode to town, the weather dark, gloomy and threatening. At the Office, where I was occupied most of the morning drawing up the deed which Mr. Curtis had given me, but I had no time to finish it. The rain came down in torrents and after having done every thing which was necessary, I left for Quincy. My ride was rainy and disagreeable. I reached there to dinner. My father kindly remembered the day and wished me happiness. I wish it to myself more on his account than my own, for he has drunk bitterness to the dregs. At four, notwithstanding the rain, I started with the little Carriage for Providence. John, our man servant, only with me. The rain was behind us so we suffered but little excepting during a mistake of the road which John made carrying us out of the way for some distance. This delayed us at Walpole until nine o’clock when we reached Fuller’s1 and I then took supper and retired immediately for the night.
1. The Half-Way House in South Walpole was run by Stephen Fuller Jr. (Willard De Lue, The Story of Walpole, 1724–1924, Norwood, Mass., 1925, p. 225).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-19

Wednesday. 19th.

I left Walpole early this morning. The weather cleared up with a cool wind which made my Coat feel comfortable when buttoned up. { 421 } We rode easily and reached Providence without any difficulty by half past ten o’clock. Having made all the necessary arrangements for keeping the horses during my absence, I went down to the Steamboat and engaged my passage. The Boat happened to be the Benjamin Franklin1 and it was some time before I could become familiarized to the scene. My good sense told me that it was weak to give way to those feelings for that2 the accident was not more than the fate of us all sooner or later and it mattered little as to the place. But a reasoner cannot always succeed. The place had seen his presence and from thence he had gone into eternity without the possibility of assuring us what the circumstances of his fate were. No eye witnessed it, no tongue can tell it. But either conclusion which we come to is horrible enough. I had no acquaintance in the boat, but gradually distracted my mind from these meditations so that it was only at times that I had a qualm. Our trip was favourable enough. There was little or nothing to affect us and so I retired to bed to sleep badly. For in these boats, nothing else can be expected.
1. The ship on which GWA made his last voyage.
2. Thus in MS.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-20

Thursday 20th.

I slept or rather remained in my berth until we reached New York not being willing to trust my feelings through the scene of the disaster. We arrived at six and landed soon after. I walked to the City Hotel and found that my Mother had arrived last evening in the boat from N. Brunswick. Soon after she came down to see me. She looked altered, more than I expected and unwell, but I tried to reflect that I had hoped too much and that she was not more unwell than I ought to have expected. Her alteration of dress ought to be taken into account, from having been fond of show and ornament, she now rejects her hair and all appearance not consistent with the utmost plainness of the deepest mourning. She was affected by my coming in the Franklin and I found to my regret that that boat would return tomorrow when we ought to go. It was therefore evident to me that this accident would be a trial. I conversed a good deal with her upon many subjects before I saw the rest of the family. She was accompanied here by John and his wife and child, very unexpectedly to me. I was however glad to see them, as I thought it would be pleasant to them and to my Mother. Mary looks tolerably well but they all seem harrassed by their Journey. John told me that my Mother’s spirit had given way excessively on the Journey and he was apprehensive of the result.
{ 422 }
The morning was passed in going round New York after sundry objects which I intended to perform while here. I called upon Mr. Frothingham, and went to Miss Thompson’s, the Milliner’s,1 to order a hat for Abby. I also walked round with John and we visited several places, among others a Furniture Warehouse where we saw all the dash of New York. There was much that was beautiful certainly. Returning, we found Baron Stackelberg had called and he sat with us for half an hour. He is much as usual. A Gentleman with all his vices. The afternoon was lounged away, partly at the Battery and partly at home, so that we found ourselves much fatigued. The family all retired early but myself who sat until ten. Mr. Charles King calling in to amuse me.
1. Phebe Thompson, a milliner, lived at 46 John Street (Longworth’s N.Y. Directory, 1828–1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-21

Friday 21st.

Morning passed in doing little or nothing. John and I took a stroll up Broadway, very far up, to look into a New York imitation of Tattersal’s in London. John has a fondness for Carriages and Horses which I do not partake in. I drive horses to get from place to place and I prefer a fast horse to a slow one, but I have no great pride in the business. Nor should I feel distressed if I never had further connection with them. On our return we called in at Mr. Stout’s, the Engraver’s,1 and I ordered a Card for Abby as Mrs. C. F. Adams anticipating a little and not without a silent qualm, but I got over this weakness, for these presentiments are always follies and only the more so when accident makes them sometimes turn out true. Afternoon, took a lounge into the Arcade and made a purchase of a little dress to make a present to the Baby. I have never as yet given her anything. This was a trifling present but even that more than my present exhausted means will allow.
Conversation with my Mother who seemed very dull and out of spirits, about George and his affairs. I tried to direct attention from the subject as much as possible, talking mildly and favourably. But she seemed constantly recurring to it. John and his Wife stayed out long so that we did not drink tea until very late after which my Mother again conversed with me, but not upon George. She principally talked of Johnson Hellen’s affairs, his marriage and treatment of the family, which affected her but not too much. She then talked of my marriage, which seemed to give her some pleasure. Thus the time passed until we separated at ten o’clock and I retired to bed. It was so evident to { 423 } me that my Mother could not go in the Franklin, that I did not even mention it, and suffered the day to pass without taking any notice of our departure.
1. James D. Stout, the engraver, at 153 and 172 Broadway (Longworth’s N.Y. Directory, 1828–1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0022

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-22

Saturday 22nd.

It was just after the Clock struck twelve, that my brother’s Wife burst into my room in the utmost alarm, and roused me from a sound sleep by telling me that my Mother had been taken excessively ill. I started directly and upon rushing upstairs found it was true enough. She was lying under one of those violent attacks which she is subject to with all the family and servants up and trying to assist her in her distress. It will be useless to detail the two hours which passed. Suffering was dreadfully stamped on them in my memory for ever. I had never seen any thing like this before, and it affected me to the soul. I was so overcome as to be very near needing some assistance as much as herself. I went downstairs however and recovered myself. The Dr. came at last and after conversation and consultation he applied some remedies which soon relieved her of the coldness about the breast which she complained of so dreadfully. I went to bed and tried to lose my feelings in sleep. Here was a new and entire revolution in my prospects. And the question occurred of what was to be done now. I did sleep after much effort after hearing the clock strike three, and awoke again at six.
I went up to see my Mother who was calm and reasonable though exceedingly unable to move at all. I sat with her some time and tried to soothe her. She had not slept at all and was very nervous, starting at any slight noise. I then conversed with her about our plans and then urged her to return to Washington. This was done with a feeling of despair. I was so apprehensive that she would do more on my account than she was able, that I preferred not taking the risk of the consequences. She might suffer from me and I preferred sacrificing all selfish wishes rather than hazard any such consequences. After breakfast the Dr. came in, a certain Dr. Watts whom I had never heard of before;1 he saw my Mother again, and John’s child which was also sick. He advised that the child should be removed from the City to the Eastward which put John in another quandary and half determined him to go to Quincy by land. Something must be done quickly, and therefore upon conversation with my Mother I submitted the two propositions, advising her strenuously to return and if neces• { 424 } sary carry the child to some healthy situation near Washington. After some argument, she agreed to return, and having thus definitely fixed upon this, I decided upon returning in the boat to Providence this afternoon. Our dinner, John and I (téte a téte) was a silent and dull one and after a parting affecting and affectionate with my Mother, I went to the Boat with John who saw me off.
I knew nobody on board. My passage was a melancholy one for it had recollections freshened to my mind by the scenes which had caused them, and my nerves which the last twenty four if not forty eight hours had shaken to excess, were in no condition to bear any thing. But time brought strength and I went to bed in a Cot at night and probably from exhaustion slept better than I ever recollect doing in a Steam boat.
1. Dr. John Watts lived at 90 Chambers Street (Longworth’s N.Y. Directory, 1828–1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0023

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-23

Sunday 23rd.

I arose in the morning feeling refreshed and strengthened but still somewhat low spirited. The weather was fine and though our boat had not made very uncommon progress, we were paid for it by the quiet off Point Judith. There is a tendency in the spirits of the young to elasticity which supports them when they would otherwise sink. I fell into Conversation with a gentleman on board whom I did not know, upon miscellaneous subjects and in this manner time slipped away until I found myself at Providence. John [Thomas] was in waiting for me, and expecting others who did not come, but I could not find leisure to explain what appeared exceedingly mysterious to him. I started directly on my return and stopping only at Walpole to dine and rest the horses, found myself again at Quincy at eight o’clock in the evening. My father came out with a smiling face to meet disappointment, deep and severe. I talked to him privately, explained to him my motives and feelings, but coldly, compared to my experience, and the scene was not present to enforce the truth of my words. He was much affected and slowly gave in to my conclusion though not very willingly. I could do nothing more so went to bed, tired and dull enough.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0024

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-24

Monday. 24th.

I have unwittingly written what happened on Tuesday when I should in the order of time have been recording what happened on the previous day. This obliges me to insert it out of turn.1 I went to town { 425 } in my own Gig. Morning at the Office. Called at Mr. Brooks’ and found that I and my two letters written on Thursday and Friday were here simultaneously. I then after talking with him, wrote her a third letter which carried the thing through it’s various phases.2 Feeling obliged to wait here for letters from my Mother until evening, I did not think it worthwhile to go to Medford myself as I should be able to reach there only very late in the evening. Passed some time in recording the eventful and voluminous occurrences of the past week.
But finding nothing to do in the afternoon, I passed it in reading Mrs. Opie’s Illustrations of Lying.3 Her philosophy is too high wrought for life as it is, and though our good sense agrees directly with much which she brings forward, yet by driving the line too far she weakens what is really likely to affect. It is too true, that people who always tell truth are not the most attractive and fascinating, they are never the most popular, and to many this is and ever will be the strongest inducement. You must alter human nature. After going to the Post Office and finding nothing from New York I rode to Quincy, though not until it was late. Found Mr. Wallenstein there, a short visit only. Fatigued and retired.
1. In the MS, the entry for Tuesday the 25th precedes that for Monday the 24th. The editors have restored the proper chronology in the present text.
2. All three letters are missing.
3. Mrs. Amelia Opie, Illustrations of Lying, in All Its Branches, 2 vols., London, 1825.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0025

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-25

Tuesday. 25th.

Morning to town in the Carriage as I wished to have it repaired and have one of the horses attended to, his feet being in bad condition. This made me very late. I found that Abby was in town this morning and therefore went up directly to the House to see her, where I remained until she left town with her father. I had much conversation with her upon the present state of our affairs and also upon the arrangements for our marriage. It is now coming on rapidly and I feel at this moment a little qualmish about it. May God protect me for I am now so in the Web of my own weaving that my own indiscretions will bring misery upon more than myself. I will however hope for better things. There is hope and it is my stay. I love Abby too much to be altogether without apprehension.
Returned to the Office and after dinner, wrote my Journal for a number of days past, then Called to see Blake who is to be my first Groomsman, and made arrangements with him, as to what it would be necessary for him to do. Not much as I hope, for I do not now feel any { 426 } desire to make display. Our family is now situated very differently from what it has been, and my spirits if they were supported before, have seen enough now since my Journey to New York, to show how little in accordance gaiety is with our feelings and situation. I then drew up my father’s accounts. Thus passed the day. No letters in the evening from my Mother or John so I returned to Quincy late.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-26

Wednesday. 25th [i.e. 26].

Morning to town but rather late owing to some conversation with my father which detained me. He is now pursuing the study of the History of this Country very assiduously, and he asks me to assist him in the mechanical part of preparing the manuscripts. I am perfectly willing to do so, but cannot help thinking that my time is of more value to me than the product which this will bring.
Occupied in town, first in writing my Journal, next in copying for my father sundry letters and papers connected with his own affairs and those of the Executors of Mr. Boylston. I felt so unwell that I thought I would take no dinner but simply subsist upon six oysters as a luncheon. My bowels not being perfectly in order. In the afternoon I went to the House and superintended the moving of my own books from the Office, which are more in number than I had expected and which will not at any rate I am fearful, go into the space I have devoted for them. But I was so exceedingly unwell during the whole afternoon that I could do nothing more than just to lay them in confusion upon the floor, and trust to a better opportunity. Besides my Carpenter has been exceedingly slow about the matter and has not yet made the last Bookcase, which provokes me exceedingly. I returned to the Office and from thence rode to Quincy after finding that there were again no letters from any of the family. I felt so unwell all day that I began to be apprehensive of a fit of sickness so I kept fast.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-27

Thursday. 27th.

Morning to town, Conversation with my father upon his property. Many very heavy calls upon it just at present. Then upon my Marriage. He made me a present this morning of three portraits. One of my Grandfather painted by Stuart and exceedingly valuable, and those of my father and Mother by the same artist but not so good.1 I was surprised and pleased. They are now in the possession of Mr. Cruft and I must attend to their being shortly transferred.
Then I rode to town. At the Office. Found there Mr. Conant from { 427 } the farm at Weston, who came to tell me that he was apprehensive he should be unable to keep it on his lease.2 I regretted this very much and conversed with him much. He appeared discouraged and said the farm would be likely to run him in debt. It was always a matter of apprehension to me that I should find it so with my father. But I tried to encourage him by telling him that he now saw the worst side and that it would improve. He left me doubtful as to what he intended to do. I feel as if this was going to be a trouble to us.
Then came Mr. Farmer, who went over a long and disgusting detail of old affairs in attempting to clear himself which I did not believe he could do. What the purpose of it was I cannot say but having found that I was not likely to give way to extortion, he changed his ground and tried apology. I told him I wished to be rid of the business as soon as possible. My poor brother had involved himself beyond redemption among a parcel of very indifferent characters. Thus my morning was wholly taken up, and after seeing Mr. Degrand upon some investment my father wished to make, I went to see Mr. Brooks, and decided upon going out to see Abby at any rate to day. I therefore went before dinner with him. Found Abby as usual and passed a very pleasant afternoon and evening with her as usual. Conversation about the future and our prospects.
1. Gilbert Stuart’s celebrated portrait of JA in old age, 1823 (now owned by C. F. Adams of Dover, Mass.), and his matching portraits of JQA and LCA painted in 1818 (now owned by Mrs. Arthur Adams of Charles River Village, Mass.).
2. Amory and Silas Conant leased the farm at Weston for $125 a year (JQA, Diary, 28 July 1829; CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 31, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-28

Friday. 28th.

Returned to town with Mr. Brooks after writing Mr. Stetson a Note1 to ask him to officiate as the Clergyman. This is not very agreeable to me but I am unwilling to cause any kind of trouble and have therefore consented to be married by a Man for whom I have but little respect. My morning was taken up without my being at the Office much as I was obliged to be in search of the remaining Articles of Furniture for my little Library. I did not succeed however in getting any thing but some Chairs. I then went to see Mr. Cruft about the pictures but could not find him at home. This was a walk for nothing, then to the House where I found that my Carpenter had succeeded in getting the case up, at last, but I regret to think it will not be quite enough. I have however already exceeded my means in this business and must therefore stop.
{ 428 }
Miss Harriet Welsh called to see me and to ask after my mother. I could tell her nothing. She goes tomorrow to Wiscasset and leaves this City no doubt in grief and with regret. I am sorry for her. Change is the spirit of the world. To many it comes in agreeable shapes, to others again it wears a more cloudy aspect. So it is now with her and with me, but the future may pay us both. Returning to the Office, I found that if I wished to get to Quincy I must hurry to reach their dinner. I again went down to see Mr. Sharpe for my Furniture,2 again failed and then started for Quincy. My horse pushed on and I arrived there.
Found that my father had received letters last night from my Mother and John at Philadelphia.3 She was better, and about as well as when I first saw her. May she be better, but futurity presents to me no further interest in her such as the past has been. I have been to her a devoted son and in every thing where I could have attempted to gratify her. She takes but little interest in the connexion which I am forming and which is going to take the place of her own former dues. I regret it, and still more that it has been necessary to take away from me a graceful parting.
The afternoon was rather wasted in looking over my wardrobe and preparing it for removal, and in assorting the Newspapers which have been accumulating ever since I came to Quincy. Evening, Conversation with my father. His expedition to Braintree.
1. Missing.
2. James Sharp, who lived at 426 Washington Street, manufactured ornamental furniture (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
3. The letter from JA2 is missing.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-29

Saturday 29th.

Morning to Boston and the Office. Occupied in writing and arranging some affairs for Thursday. Called on Mr. Cruft for those pictures but found him again not at home. I delivered my letter1 to his wife and took the opportunity to pay her a visit long due. This took some time. Mr. Whitney called and paid me a quarter’s rent, which I was very much delighted with, for I have not much money remaining on the Agency. My father came in and delivered me two or three messages and commissions which I performed. But my time passed as usual in that undefined manner which I am so constantly experiencing, being always busy about nothing, or at least what appears to be nothing. My father studiously labours to keep things out of my way too with which to trouble me, and he is exceedingly kind. I took no dinner but some Oysters today and these did not agree with me, which is passing { 429 } strange, for I never knew them to make my head ache before. I went to the House the afternoon and tried to find my Carpenter but he was not there. The Bookcase is coming on slowly and I felt quite discouraged about it’s completion. I succeeded this day in ordering the remainder of my furniture for my room. After these things had all been done I went to Medford and found Abby as usual. Mrs. Brooks still well though not quite so lively as during the week. Evening agreeable.
1. The letter was from JQA (JQA to Edward Cruft, 27 Aug. 1829, LbC, Adams Papers); it directed that the three Stuart paintings be given to CFA.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-30

Sunday. 30th.

Morning at home. Abby did not go to Meeting, this being the time of probation and we spent the day pretty much together. As the time approaches she begins to feel a little more alarmed and during the whole of today was quite nervous at the idea of leaving her home. It will be quite a trying thing for her I am conscious and this will make it trying to me. But the Rubicon is now too near to think of results until after it is passed. I amused myself reading a few Articles of an old New Monthly which I found in the Library. In the afternoon Mr. Gorham and his son called in to drink tea and take final leave of Abby in her single state. This affected her considerably. She had before the recollections of the past, the associations with home, which endear themselves the more to her as she is about losing their enjoyment forever. But this is a hackneyed topic, and inasmuch as every woman does the same thing it shows that there are more than enough in the opposite balance. I felt myself much more really what I am about, as my Conscience does not altogether bear me out. But I hope and trust and I have been carried through so much, I think now I may look forward joyfully. A very short time now will prove the result.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0031

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-31

Monday 31st.

Morning return to town, with Abby whom I left at the House. Then to the Office where I was busy for some time making up my Journal, and performing several little commissions. Then to the House where I found Abby, Anne Carter, Julia Gorham, Mrs. Edward and Mrs. Chardon Brooks. They dropped in one after the other and went out again. I remained wasting my time, much of the morning. But I accomplished my purpose of having the pictures hung which belong to me. They now form quite a goodly collection. That of my Grandfather is invaluable both as a Painting and as a correct likeness of what { 430 } he was in those times. My Mother is a likeness but not a good painting. Her face wears a sorrowful appearance too common to her, and also very fresh now in my recollection. But I shall value that picture as I do her Miniatures as presenting even something of her appearance in those days.1 For hereafter there will be nothing. And I love to think of her as she was, in the midst of her gaiety and her prosperity. My father’s is not good being Stewart’s [Stuart’s] first attempt, but I value it notwithstanding. I would prefer Copley’s at Quincy, but that must remain where it is.2 My own two little ones turn out quite beauties, being properly set off and answer very well in their places.
I lounged away too much time here so that I only gave myself enough afterwards to draw up my Accounts for the month previous to going to Quincy. They show rather a favourable balance since last month. Dined at Quincy. Afternoon passed in making up my House Expense Book and in packing a portion of my Clothes to go to Boston. The doing it was tedious. Evening, Conversation with my father. His Inscriptions with remarks upon the subject generally. I think it tolerably well but the closing line of each has not point enough.3
1. For instance, the miniature of LCA made by J. T. Barber in 1797 shows her as gay and lovely. It is reproduced in Bemis, JQA, vol. 1, facing p. 82.
2. John Singleton Copley’s portrait of JQA, made in London in 1795, is now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. It is reproduced in Bemis, JQA, vol. 1, facing p. 80.
3. See entry for 7 July, and note, above.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0009-0001

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-09-01

Tuesday September 1st.

Morning to town but rather late, having to copy and prepare a number of letters for my Father, and making also some final arrangements before leaving. At the Office, found a Woman there about that business of Farmer’s which is disgusting and disgraceful and the less I see of it the better. Though he is a troublesome and dangerous animal. I wait only for the passage of time. I was then engaged in performing all my other little duties previous to my Marriage. Renewed a policy of Insurance upon the Tenements in Common or Tremont Street for my father and obtained some necessary articles of dress. Drew Accounts due from the Tenants particularly from my very good friend Mrs. Longhurst. Another quarter. She notifies me she will send soon. Thus passed the morning.
In the afternoon I went to the House and filled my last book case. There is much left, which I know not what to do with. And my room is full already. So that I must sell or send them to Quincy. I incline to the opinion I shall try the first and what I cannot sell, I shall send. { 431 } It was a great Parade day, and many people were upon the Common, and the Cannon were noisy.1 I became exceedingly fatigued for it was late before I had finished. This being the last day upon which I shall attempt to exert myself. My books must hereafter be all of them rearranged. For I have at this time followed no method. Enough for the present. I am sick and tired of the Job. I then rode to Medford. Found Abby as usual but I was so tired that I could not exert myself to be lively at all. This made her dull, and we had so stupid an evening, that I concluded it was best to put an end to it early so I retired to bed at a little past nine.
1. The governor reviewed the light infantry, artillery, and cavalry companies of the first division of the Massachusetts militia on the Common. There followed a “sumptuous collation” and a “sham action” (Boston Daily Advertiser, 2 Sept. 1829; Columbian Centinel, 5 Sept. 1829).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0009-0002

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-09-02

Wednesday 2d.

Morning, early return to Boston calling upon Mr. Bartlett on the way and obtaining the Medford Certificate. The weather was exceedingly warm, and sultry. I wrote my Journal and walked up to the House to see how it looked. But nothing was changed since my visit of yesterday. The workmen not having as yet arrived. I lounged here for some time, Mrs. Frothingham, Mrs. P. Chardon Brooks, and Miss Phillips having come to do their share towards beautifying. Being tired of Indolence I then went down to take a Bath, and enjoyed a great luxury in a warm one. My system seems to be a little out of order by my trip to New York and I thought this might be a benefit to it. I enjoyed it much. Thence I went to my Office feeling very languid. The heat was greater to my feeling than at any other time this season. The air being a hot South wind.
I went to Quincy to dine, it being the last day upon which I shall probably be there in a similar way. In the afternoon I was occupied in packing my things and making the final arrangements here. I regret a little leaving here and this way of life for with many disadvantages it has some pleasures and not a little Independence. But I have views and objects in life other than this loose way allows, and I have affections which are worth cultivating now if ever. My father may miss me a little but my Company has been but little to him this Summer and he has become so attached to his way of life that it has nothing to require in addition. I copied a letter from him to Col. Knapp1 and performed the few last duties which will fall upon me for the present. Evening, rain and lightning after the great heat, the clouds { 432 } passed however, threatening much but performing little. Conversation with my father—Persico and the ornamenting of the Capitol. Few people in this Country are aware of the fact that he is the source of all that is ornamental in the Statuary sculpture about the Capitol. Persico has done well in executing the ideas not his own but how few here know or would give credit if they did to the source from whence the taste really proceeded.2
1. CFA’s copy of JQA’s letter to Samuel Knapp, 2 Sept. 1829, is in JQA’s Letter-books, Adams Papers.
2. For hints of JQA’s contributions toward the sculptured decoration of the United States Capitol, see his Memoirs, 7:20–21; 8:45–46, 81, 123; 9:193.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0009-0003

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-09-03

Thursday. 3rd.

Morning passed in separating all my affairs and living at Quincy. I now take a final leave of the place and launch my bark into a New Sea. Had some conversation with my Father upon his projects of building and arranging his way of life. He now intends to make a fireproof room for his Library and the papers of himself and his father. I see objections to this as it entails the old Mansion upon me in case I should live. But this must be the case I think in any event. And so I must calculate. Then I had some general conversation with him, upon the subject of his Affairs which seem to be looking rather better than they have done. After this I went to Boston. The weather which was so warm yesterday changed this morning and we had a violent North Wester which blinded me fully as I rode into town. I do not think for a long time I have had a more unpleasant ride than during this morning. But it was my last. The morning was passed very quietly at the Office. I did little or nothing having formed as yet no systematic occupation through the day. This must now soon be done.
In the afternoon, after a light dinner, I went to the House, took a Bath, spent an hour at Chardon Brooks’ talking with his Wife and then went to the House to dress. My feelings were of a complicated kind, a little dread mixed with much coolness, and determination to go through what was my task. I dressed in the gay and showy style of a bridegroom, and at six o’clock went down to take up Miss Anne Carter one of the bridemaids, and afterwards Mrs. P. C. Brooks, who also accompanied me out. Our ride was rapid, but we reached there1 late and not until many of the Company had assembled and the Minister had been sent for. The Company was exceedingly private consisting only of the immediate members of the family, Mr. Brooks and his Wife, Edward and his Wife, Chardon and Sidney with their { 433 } Wives, Mr. Everett and Mr. Frothingham with their Wives, Edward Blake and Edmund Quincy, Miss Anne Carter and Henrietta Gray. My father, Thomas B. Adams, Lydia Phillips, Mr. Stetson and his Wife. Mr. Stetson performed the Ceremony with much hesitation, and more difficulty than I could easily imagine possible. But I was not very much overcome and Abby had screwed her courage so strongly that she succeeded wonderfully. Indeed I cannot too warmly admire her conduct through the evening. She was spurred by many motives and acquitted herself to my pride and my satisfaction. Indeed she manifested to me qualities which I have always known to be in her, and for which I have married her. Supper followed and I sat next to Mrs. Sidney Brooks and Lydia Phillips, the two least interesting women in the room to me. It went pretty much as such things usually do. And by midnight we were on our road to town, took possession of our house and there consummated the marriage.
The Rubicon is now passed and I enter into a fresh and new mode of life. I shall therefore begin a new Journal. This event to which we have all been so anxiously looking is over and now the results may be seen. Let me pour out my Soul in prayer and devotion to a most high God, that he may guide me in the right path, that he may sustain me in this responsible station in life, that he may continue to shower down his blessings upon me, and receive the thanks of a grateful but humble heart for the many mercies already received, fit me to perform the part assigned me and lead us through this life to a happier in the succeeding World.
1. Medford.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-03-0002

Chronology

Charles Francis Adams’ Life, 1807–1829

1807   Aug. 18   Born in Boston in the family house which stood across from the Common on the southeast corner of the present Tremont and Boylston streets, occupying part of the site of the present Hotel Touraine.  
1809   Aug.—Oct.   Travels with his parents aboard the Horace to St. Petersburg, where his father serves as Minister to Russia until May 1814. His brothers, GWA and JA2, remain in Boston.  
1813   July   Begins attending Mr. Fishwick’s school in St. Petersburg.  
1815   Feb.—March   Travels overland from St. Petersburg to Paris with his mother to join his father after completion of the latter’s work at Ghent as an American commissioner to negotiate peace with England. In Paris during part of “the Hundred Days,” where he sees Napoleon shortly before Waterloo.  
1815   May   Travels with his parents from Paris to London, where his father serves as American Minister to England. His brothers rejoin the family.  
1815   Aug.   Moves with his family from Cavendish Square to a country house in the suburb of Ealing. CFA and JA2 are placed in Dr. Nicholas’ boarding school in Ealing.  
1817   June—Aug.   Upon the appointment of his father by President Monroe as Secretary of State, returns with his family to New York aboard { 438 } the Washington. They sail on the packet Fame from New York to Providence and proceed by stage to Quincy, arriving on CFA’s tenth birthday, 18 August.  
1817   Sept.   Enrolled in Benjamin A. Gould’s Boston Public Latin School with his brother JA2; they live with Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Welsh.  
1818   Oct. 28   His grandmother, Abigail Adams, dies at the Old House in Quincy.  
1819   Sept.   Moves to Washington to live with his family.  
1819   Oct.   Enrolled in George E. Ironside’s school.  
1820   Jan. 1   His surviving “Index” Diary begins.  
1821   Feb.   Matriculates in Harvard College.  
1824   April   Records his membership in the Society of the Knights of the Order of the Square Table, a Harvard club which later merged with the Porcellian Club.  
1824   June   Elected president of the Lyceum Club, an informal organization of Harvard students who boarded together. Appointed second commandant in the Harvard Washington Corps.  
1825   Feb.   Failing to win a majority of electoral votes in the November election, JQA is elected President by a bare majority in the House of Representatives.  
1825   March   Attends the inauguration of his father as President.  
1825   April   Takes part in a Harvard Exhibition.  
1825   July   Returns to Washington to read law under his father’s tutelage.  
1825   Aug.   Receives his A.B. degree in absentia.  
1826   Feb. 11   Records his first meeting, at a Washington ball, with Abigail Brown Brooks, daughter of Peter Chardon Brooks of Medford, Mass.  
{ 439 }
1825   July 4   His grandfather, John Adams, dies at the Old House in Quincy during the jubilee celebration of national independence.  
1827   Feb. 10   In Washington, proposes marriage to Abigail Brooks.  
1827   March   Becomes engaged to Abigail Brooks. Their courtship correspondence begins.  
1827   Aug.   Returns to Boston to read law in Daniel Webster’s office.  
1827   Oct.   His father consents to correspond with him to guide his career. Becomes a member of a Moot Court in Boston, established by a “Society of Students at Law.”  
1828   Feb. 25   His brother JA2 marries Mary Catherine Hellen in Washington, and they make their permanent home there.  
1828   Aug.   Attends Harvard commencement and receives his M.A. degree.  
1828   Nov.   His father is defeated for reelection to the Presidency by Andrew Jackson. CFA is admitted a member of the Boston Debating Society, a private group. His first newspaper contribution, signed “A Lover of Justice,” is published in the (Boston) Massachusetts Journal.  
1829   Jan.   Admitted to the Suffolk County Bar, and begins to practice in the Court of Common Pleas.  
1829   Feb.   Earns his first fee as a lawyer.  
1829   April 30   His brother GWA is drowned by falling or jumping overboard from the steamship Benjamin Franklin in Long Island Sound.  
1829   June   JQA returns to Quincy; LCA remains in Washington. CFA succeeds GWA as JQA’s business agent.  
1829   Sept. 3   Marries Abigail Brown Brooks at Medford and occupies with her a house provided by her father at 3 Hancock Avenue, “under the shadow of the State House,” on Beacon Hill in Boston.  
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/