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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-27

Friday 27th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Found a case of but little in• { 360 } terest and did not remain but looked into Blackstone. Afternoon, engaged in Say. His reasoning is clear after reading Smith, though I am disposed to think it incorrect. I was much shocked today by receiving the information of the death of Dr. Gorham, after a short illness. This seems like something entirely foreign from the course of my ideas and only serves to suggest the reflection of the very slight nature of our tenure of this life. But this is a hackneyed subject, and though the idea is one at all times fearful, the expression of it has become commonplace. In the evening, I was more interested than I have been in the Letters of Pope.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-28

Saturday. 28th.

Morning at the Office and in Court, but finding nothing very instructive there I occupied myself in writing a letter to my Mother. Little or nothing of consequence took place. A rumor of an engagement between Mr. Webster and a young lady of this place was the prevailing topic of conversation.1 Afternoon reading Say, the day was mild and pleasant. Abby was in town at Mrs. Gorhams and I found her walking to her brother Edward’s. But of course I could see very little of her. I took a walk as usual, and in the evening sat at the Office reading Pope’s Letters. The Moot Court having adjourned for the Season. Returned home early.
1. CFA thought Webster’s reported engagement to a Miss Parker “a shocking misalliance” (CFA to LCA, 4 April 1829, Adams Papers). The rumor was untrue.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0029

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-29

Sunday 29th.

The day was lovely, being the first of the kind which we have had during this season. As Abby wanted me to drive her out of town this morning, I called for her at eleven and reached Medford to dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Everett were there also and we had a tolerably pleasant day. Mrs. Brooks looks ill, very ill. My surprise is that she should continue to live as she does, but this idea would I presume very much distress the family if I was to express it, so I am silent. Returned to town in the afternoon. Roads not of the finest and I was glad to return safe from an excursion not entirely without danger. Evening, a very long walk, which fatigued me more than I expected and so I did not sleep so well as usual, but my day was on the whole very agreeable.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0003-0030

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-03-30

Monday. 30th.

Morning at the Office and in Court. Heard an argument which did not instruct me and so returned to read Blackstone. Attendance upon { 361 } Court is useful, but the tedium of it is at times extremely discouraging. In the afternoon. Read Say for an hour and then went to the funeral of Dr. Gorham. The number of persons who attended was very large and there was something solemn in the idea. We followed the body to Brattle Street Church and heard a Prayer from Dr. Channing with an Address by Dr. Jackson. The place was crowded. I could not help feeling this voluntary tribute to moral worth. It struck me more in its simplicity and in my precise state of feeling than would have done much more expensive, perhaps more brilliant exhibitions and performances. Dr. Jackson did not succeed in touching the feelings. These were affected purely by the circumstances. They did not need, nor obtain any adventitious aid. I did not follow the body to the grave, it being late, and about to rain, having paid already my mite of respect to his memory. Evening at the Office, reading Pope’s Correspondence.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/