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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0013

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-13

Monday. 13th.

Day rather cold for this month but I had a pleasant ride into town from Medford. The roads are becoming better. Morning at the Office. Richardson called and paid me a visit of some length.
George received a letter from Washington asking him to go on and accompany them home.1 He is in such a state of mind, I think it is as well that he should do that as any thing. I cannot help pitying the miserable weakness of his character while I regret it. He has of late rather avoided my society as I neither participate in his griefs which are the result of culpable indolence, nor can sanction the results which it brings him to. This invitation I presume to be the result of a statement in one of my own letters to my Mother some days ago.2 He is undecided as usual.
Read Blackstone. Returned to my boarding house with much gratification. Found the family still out of order but my room was to me a consideration of much pleasure. Afternoon, Say, not interesting nor deep. Evening, Commenced reading over the Spectator with which I was pleased.
1. LCA wrote: “I . . . write . . . my Dear George to beg . . . that you will . . . come on here to escort your father and myself on our way home. You know that we are neither of us famous travellers and your assistance for me will be absolutely necessary” (LCA to GWA, 8 April 1829, Adams Papers).
2. For some time CFA had been telling his mother of GWA’s indolence and aimlessness. On 4 April he suggested that his parents’ early return to Quincy { 366 } would “be of great service to George .... He wants bracing and enlivening. His entire seclusion from society . . . and his want of occupation produce a listlessness peculiarly oppressive. He complains of dejection, low spirits, and inability to occupy himself, and this acts upon reflections of a melancholy kind in regard to Father and himself” (CFA to LCA, 4 April 1829, Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0014

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-14

Tuesday 14th.

This morning is the first which reminds us of the advance of Spring. I went to the Office early and passed part of my time in the Common Pleas, part at George’s Office talking with him and my Uncle, and part in study of Law. Afternoon, Say and a visit from George, who appears to revive under the new prospect of a journey to Washington. Evening, reading Johnson’s Life of Pope. The day passed pleasantly on the whole, and my spirits were tolerable.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-15

Wednesday. 15th.

Another beautiful day. Morning at the Office. I propose to divide my time now as the mornings have become so long and attempt to read three Branches of the Law at once but these are connected so as to produce no confusion. Afternoon, Say’s Political Economy which strikes me not so favourably as it did formerly, probably on account of the difference of age and judgment. In the evening, the Spectator. I was troubled a little today with head ache for the first time for many months.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-16

Thursday 16th.

Morning at the Office. My head still troubled me a little and continued to do so throughout the day. Read Blackstone and Law as usual. I find this a perplexing business. Afternoon, finished Say and read Cicero’s Eighth Oration against Antony principally on account of my father’s recommendation. The object which he had in view was to explain his manner of writing, but my suggestions are not weakened by their effect. Evening, The Spectator. The day was passed on the whole very studiously.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0004-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-04-17

Friday 17th.

Morning at the Office, reading Blackstone. The weather begins to give signs of relenting. At twelve, I went with George to Quincy to see about my trees, and was engaged during the whole afternoon in transplanting some of the trees which I put down last year. They succeeded uncommonly well during the last year, but the accidents and { 367 } neglect to which they were subjected checked them somewhat. My Uncle this day vacated the house, an event I have long looked for but which when it came surprised me. The mansion looks melancholy and old and ill used and gave me many ideas which I would have preferred not to have had, but so it must be. Returned to town early.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/