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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0004

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-04

Thursday. 4th.

Morning at the Office. Weather again warm and pleasant. I was { 385 } tempted foolishly to day to go down to an Auction and the consequence was that I purchased more than in the state of my funds I should have done. Thus the greater part of the morning was spent. On my return to my Office I found Mr. Brooks had called for me, and I went to Medford with him. But I did not enjoy myself quite as much as usual, on many accounts. Mrs. Brooks was absent, on a little journey. Henry arrived at home.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-05

Friday 5th.

Returned to town this morning with Mr. Brooks. Found a letter at last, from my Mother, but containing little or no information of a satisfactory nature. She says my father has had a sharp bilious attack and the Journey is postponed, making some intimation of a change of plans and destination which is perfectly incomprehensible to me. I regret very much this state of things and wish earnestly I had nothing to do with it but I cannot avoid feeling some interest in their plans though perfectly ignorant of them. Time will show. Morning in some measure wasted, which will never do. I must set about reform. Afternoon, Clarendon, and Hume, together with a half hour of the Memoirs of Grammont which is considered so amusing.1 Evening, a visit to Miss Welsh by request in which she was very officious. This is in a great degree her difficulty.
1. CFA’s copy of Mémoires de la vie du comte de Grammont, Rotterdam, 1716, is in the Stone Library.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-06

Saturday. 6th.

Morning at the Office. Engaged in writing as usual. I did not reform this morning, but passed it nearly all in reading the Memoirs of Grammont, very witty but very licentious. J. Eckley1 called upon me this morning and gave me notice that he had left the room above mine in this building and he paid me to the date for the rent. He seemed to think that George had thought of his fate some time and told me an anecdote of his [Eckley’s] insisting upon a receipt at the last Quarter which he had not done usually. It turned out luckily this time. But I do not think his idea has any foundation. That he [GWA] was in circumstances, where death or great trouble of mind were alternatives is however certain. This is a question which now can be explained by no human power, but my own impressions are derived from a careful perusal of his papers wherein nothing of the kind seems apparent. On the contrary, many references to the future. He was in the habit of committing the feeling of the moment so { 386 } much to paper, that I cannot help thinking this notion would now and then casually escape him.
I went to Medford with Mr. Brooks, to keep Abby Company as I thought she was alone, but I found Mrs. Brooks and the family had returned from their short excursion, not in the best condition. But I enjoyed myself very much.
1. Joseph Eckley, of 23 Court Street (Boston Directory, 1828).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/