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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0019

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-19

Friday 19th.

Morning at the Office. Wrote my Journal and copied a portion of my Index but was much occupied all day. Richardson called in and spent an hour with me. Mr. H. H. Tuckerman called to offer to my father ten shares in the Boylston Market.1 Hollis, the housewright called and I instituted a commencement for a settlement in regard to the Common Street Houses. My father proposes to look into these affairs pretty thoroughly. Mr. Hovey, the Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk,2 { 392 } called about an execution against Jacob George, no settlement. I then went to Dr. Welsh’s and got some Keys for Quincy. This took up nearly all the morning. I then made some purchases, and after dinner again rode to Quincy. Found my father not very well. The afternoon and evening were passed in desultory conversation. My father opened the subject of George and Dr. Storer’s letter.3 I conversed freely with him and relieved his mind much. Then into town which I reached shortly after ten.
1. Henry H. Tuckerman, a merchant, lived at 44 Chesnut Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830). The Boylston Market, at the corner of Boylston and Washington streets, had been designed in 1810 by Charles Bulfinch (Whitehill, Boston: A Topographical History, p. 69).
2. John Hovey, of Roxbury (Mass. Register, 1828, p. 245).
3. The letter from Dr. David Humphreys Storer, who lived at 298 Washington Street, is missing. Apparently he presented a bill for his medical services to Eliza Dolph. See entries of 13 and 28 May, above, and 16 July, below.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0020

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-20

Saturday 20th.

Morning at the Office a short time, and engaged for the remainder in making purchases at the different places in town. This occupied me much. My purchases were very generally rather of ordinary Articles, but fit for upper rooms in the old house. They match well with that ancient place. I obtained the Chests which my father had deposited some time since in the Bank.1 But I was some time delayed. After much labour and exertion I finished all my duties and felt glad to be relieved from the labour. After passing an hour of the afternoon in arranging my brother’s papers a little, I rode to Medford to see Abby whom I had not seen before for a week. We passed the afternoon and evening much as usual. When one is pleased there is little to say about it. Made a short call at Mrs. Frothingham’s new house.2
1. The five chests contained books (JQA, Diary, 20 June 1829).
2. At 43 Summer Street (Boston Directory, 1831–1832).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0006-0021

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-06-21

Sunday. 21st.

Fine morning after a smart thunder shower. Attended divine service in the morning and heard a certain Mr. Robinson preach a very dull Sermon upon natural religion.1 He gave me however one new idea, though I doubt exceedingly it’s being original with him. The house seemed exceedingly dull, as Mr. Brooks had gone to town on his law case which was still pending and troublesome,2 and Mrs. B. was unwell upstairs. She dined below however and seemed better. In the afternoon, Abby went with me to Mrs. Everett’s to take tea. Found her and Lydia Phillips alive and well. The former amused me with { 393 } a letter of Mr. Everett’s, which she had just received. She seemed in exceedingly high spirits upon the occasion. After taking tea, we returned and found several people had been up to inquire about Mr. Brooks, his absence being wonderful at Church.
1. Charles Robinson, the Congregational minister at Groton (Mass. Register, 1828, p. 114).
2. See entry for 16 June, and note, above.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/