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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0005

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-05

Sunday 5th.

The rain came down with great force during the night and the morning was misty and disagreeable. I attended service at Quincy and heard Mr. Whitney preach a sermon upon integrity in business, good and practical. The remainder of the day was passed in reading Bishop Burnet’s History of the Reformation which is very interesting, though told in rather an old woman’s way.1 This quiet and literary life pleases me much, and I might grow much attached to Quincy { 399 } as it now is, if I did not feel as if I had other more urgent duties to call me from thence. Evening, much literary conversation with my father—The English Writers, and the French biographical Memoirs of the last Century, My Grandfather’s Library, which is exceedingly valuable. John returned late from town.
1. CFA’s copy of Bishop Gilbert Burnet’s The History of the Reformation of the Church of England, 6 vols., Oxford, 1816, is in the Stone Library.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0006

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-06

Monday. 6th.

Morning to town. The weather which for the past week has been cold and disagreeable, today promised better. At the Office, occupied in drawing up the requisite papers for the settlement of my brother’s affairs. I have almost completed the Inventory which now wants only the attention of the appraizers. I also settled some bills, as well my father’s as my own. I am afraid if I do not hit upon some clear method, that these two will fall into a little confusion. Dined at the Exchange Ordinary alone which is unpleasant. Afternoon, at Dr. Welsh’s, finishing the Inventory of the Library. Poor Thomas Welsh has decided to go to prison upon his debt to the State Bank, which I regret. Returned to Quincy. Evening, Conversation with my father, but without much interest.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0007

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-07

Tuesday 7th.

Morning at the Office. A pleasant day and easy ride. Passed the larger part of it in making up the papers of my brother’s affairs, and in little transactions of various kinds which require much time though I can give but little account of them. I have little or nothing particular to state just at present as in this way only can my engagements be accounted for. Called at Mrs. Tarbell’s to make final settlement with her. Then went to Mr. Carey’s, a sculptor in stone, for my father and had some conversation with him upon the subject of a tablet which he designs having made for my Grandfather in Quincy Meeting house.1 Returned to Quincy. Evening, my father seemed slightly dull. Conversation, Dr. Watkins’ case, public peculations.2
1. For JQA’s inscriptions on the memorial tablet to JA and AA on the interior wall of the church at Quincy, see Bemis, JQA, 2:125.
2. JQA’s old friend, Tobias Watkins, whom President Jackson had removed from his post as Fourth Auditor in the Treasury Department, was convicted of having embezzled funds remitted by navy agents. JQA thought that politics motivated the prosecution (JQA, Memoirs, 8:116, 141, 151, 290).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-08

Wednesday 8th.

Morning to town. Occupied all the morning in sundry duties as { 400 } usual. I went to see about the bust of my Grandfather which is at a store on India Wharf.1 I found it safe there and had some conversation with Mr. Cruft about it. Nothing yet from Mr. Everett and so I do not see Abby. Afternoon passed in making a separation of my books from George’s which much incumber me. Tomorrow I propose to go over with the appraisement and get through as fast as possible with it. I also ordered my bookcases for my room in our proposed habitation. Returned to Quincy early and passed the evening pleasantly with my father. Conversation, Painting and Sculpture.
1. This was Horatio Greenough’s bust of JA, executed in Italy. It surmounts the memorial tablet to JA and AA in Quincy’s First Church. Tablet and bust are illustrated in Daniel Munro Wilson, The “Chappel of Ease” and Church of Statesmen . . . [Quincy], 1890, facing p. 103.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/