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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0008

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-08

Wednesday 8th.

Morning to town. Occupied all the morning in sundry duties as { 400 } usual. I went to see about the bust of my Grandfather which is at a store on India Wharf.1 I found it safe there and had some conversation with Mr. Cruft about it. Nothing yet from Mr. Everett and so I do not see Abby. Afternoon passed in making a separation of my books from George’s which much incumber me. Tomorrow I propose to go over with the appraisement and get through as fast as possible with it. I also ordered my bookcases for my room in our proposed habitation. Returned to Quincy early and passed the evening pleasantly with my father. Conversation, Painting and Sculpture.
1. This was Horatio Greenough’s bust of JA, executed in Italy. It surmounts the memorial tablet to JA and AA in Quincy’s First Church. Tablet and bust are illustrated in Daniel Munro Wilson, The “Chappel of Ease” and Church of Statesmen . . . [Quincy], 1890, facing p. 103.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0009

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-09

Thursday 9th.

Morning to town. Engaged all the morning in an appraisement of the Books belonging to my late brother,1 which were got through with so far as they were at the Office before dinner. The afternoon was passed in copying out the Inventory. So that I had fairly but little leisure to attend to any thing else. This employment of my time is hardly satisfactory to me, for I have ends of my own in life to answer. Out of town in the evening. Many visitors, Mr. Beale, Mr. and Mrs. J. Greenleaf, Mr. C. Foster and his sister. Conversation with my father, Mr. Boylston’s affairs.
1. GWA’s library was worth about $2500, but in 1828 JQA had bought it from him for $2000 so that GWA could pay his debts. The books, however, remained in GWA’s hands as his father’s “agent” (Bemis, JQA, 2:178).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-10

Friday 10th.

My brother rode to town with me this morning as he takes leave of us for Washington again. At the office, but owing to the circumstance that the Common Pleas did not meet as I expected, I had a little leisure time. Received a letter from my Mother in rather low spirits,1 which pained me so much. I felt obliged to make an immediate reply.2 I wrote my letter just before dinner. Dr. Lewis3 called and paid me one Quarter’s rent upon the House in Common Street. Dined at the Exchange Coffee House with John. Met there Mr. Fletcher who was very civil to me. I think he has a good opinion of me. I certainly think well of him. After dinner, went to Dr. Welsh’s and met the appraisers, first calling upon Miss Oliver4 and obtaining one quarter’s rent from her, which on the whole made a pretty good day. The afternoon was warm and the appraisal of the books was { 401 } exceedingly tiresome. It took up the whole afternoon until seven o’clock so that I had very little time to take leave of John and go to Quincy. My father and Louisa Smith went down to Mr. Greenleafs to tea but I felt so fatigued, I wished to go to bed immediately. John’s departure materially increases my cares.
1. “My children have alas to reproach me for a too earnest desire to promote their exertions,” LCA grieved, “. . . and my heart tells me that perhaps I urged your unfortunate brother beyond his strength to exertion foreign to his nature. If so may God Almighty forgive the mistaken zeal of an offending mortal” (LCA to CFA, 5 July 1829, Adams Papers).
2. CFA urged his mother to stop her “tormenting and unnecessary pain of unmerited self reproach.” “If I felt disposed to regret what I cannot now amend,” he added, “I might now charge myself as you do with having been the cause of the result. For my letter [see entry for 13 April, and note, above] occasioned yours which invited him. But . . . my wishes proceeded from the very best intentions. ... I have nothing to charge my conscience with” (CFA to LCA, 10 July 1829, Adams Papers).
3. Dr. Winslow Lewis Jr. lived on Tremont (often called Common) Street, at the corner of Boylston Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
4. Presumably a relative of Rev. Daniel Oliver, who lived in one of JQA’s houses on Hancock Street (CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 7, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/