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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0010

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-10

Friday 10th.

My brother rode to town with me this morning as he takes leave of us for Washington again. At the office, but owing to the circumstance that the Common Pleas did not meet as I expected, I had a little leisure time. Received a letter from my Mother in rather low spirits,1 which pained me so much. I felt obliged to make an immediate reply.2 I wrote my letter just before dinner. Dr. Lewis3 called and paid me one Quarter’s rent upon the House in Common Street. Dined at the Exchange Coffee House with John. Met there Mr. Fletcher who was very civil to me. I think he has a good opinion of me. I certainly think well of him. After dinner, went to Dr. Welsh’s and met the appraisers, first calling upon Miss Oliver4 and obtaining one quarter’s rent from her, which on the whole made a pretty good day. The afternoon was warm and the appraisal of the books was { 401 } exceedingly tiresome. It took up the whole afternoon until seven o’clock so that I had very little time to take leave of John and go to Quincy. My father and Louisa Smith went down to Mr. Greenleafs to tea but I felt so fatigued, I wished to go to bed immediately. John’s departure materially increases my cares.
1. “My children have alas to reproach me for a too earnest desire to promote their exertions,” LCA grieved, “. . . and my heart tells me that perhaps I urged your unfortunate brother beyond his strength to exertion foreign to his nature. If so may God Almighty forgive the mistaken zeal of an offending mortal” (LCA to CFA, 5 July 1829, Adams Papers).
2. CFA urged his mother to stop her “tormenting and unnecessary pain of unmerited self reproach.” “If I felt disposed to regret what I cannot now amend,” he added, “I might now charge myself as you do with having been the cause of the result. For my letter [see entry for 13 April, and note, above] occasioned yours which invited him. But . . . my wishes proceeded from the very best intentions. ... I have nothing to charge my conscience with” (CFA to LCA, 10 July 1829, Adams Papers).
3. Dr. Winslow Lewis Jr. lived on Tremont (often called Common) Street, at the corner of Boylston Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
4. Presumably a relative of Rev. Daniel Oliver, who lived in one of JQA’s houses on Hancock Street (CFA, Accounts as Manager of John Quincy Adams’ Finances, 1828–1846, p. 7, M/CFA/3, Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 297; Boston Directory, 1829–1830).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0011

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-11

Saturday 11th.

Morning to town. At the Office. Deposited Miss Oliver’s money, and then met the Appraisers again and went through with all the remainder of poor George’s things. This took up much time, the remainder until four o’clock was passed in copying out the appraisement which is long and tedious. I then went to Medford and found Abby after so long an absence. The time was pleasantly passed. Sidney Brooks and his wife out here with Mr. Frothingham making on the whole a large family.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0012

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-12

Sunday 12th.

At home all day. Ennuyé un peu. Too many people here. I cannot somehow or other get along pleasantly, and why, it is inconceivable to me unless perhaps that the manners are too noisy for my modest diffidence. I am unable to make that stir which others do. Sidney and his wife, Mr. Everett and his wife, Mr. Frothingham and his wife, and Mr. Briggs, the Minister who preached,1 were the persons who were here during the course of the day but they all left before evening, which I passed as usual with Abby. I am a little surprised to hear of the dissolution of the engagement of Allyne Otis with Miss Lenox. But from what I have heard, it ought not perhaps to astonish me. I was not aware of it, when I met him the other day.
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1. Presumably Charles Briggs, the Congregational preacher at Lexington (Mass. Register, 1829, p. 115).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/