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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0026

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-26

Sunday 26th.

Passed all day at home at Medford. The day pleasant but quite { 409 } cool. I read the remaining Articles of the last Number of the North American Review and also Abbot’s Letters on the condition of Cuba.1 These might be amusing as Letters though they fail to make a book. A Country Clergyman travelling for health with ideas confined very much by former habits and studies has but little power of explaining the resources and manners and disadvantages of foreign countries. He seems to have relished good cheer and kind people and to have met more than usual of each. Conversation with Abby. She inclines to fix the third of September for our marriage, which now rapidly approaches.
1. Abiel Abbot, Letters Written in the Interior of Cuba, Boston, 1829.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0027

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-27

Monday 27th.

Returned to town this morning. Passed it in a manner not altogether so useful as I might have done. Called on Mr. Davis at Mr. Webster’s Office and had much conversation with him upon many subjects. He is a pleasant young man. I then went to see if I could make any arrangements by which I might dispose of some of the duplicates and useless books which are among George’s, but I found that I should not be very likely to succeed at private sale. I then went and made a few purchases for my father. The afternoon was passed in making a disposition of George’s papers. All the manuscripts were transported from his room, and many of the books which I incline to sell were separated from the rest. In this manner I shall save a double transportation. He has many useless and some vicious books. I was delayed until late, and reached Quincy late. Evening, my father but little conversation.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0007-0028

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-07-28

Tuesday 28th.

Arose early this morning in order to start with my father for Weston. He having fixed this day to go and see the farm which is there in his possession, and the gift of Mr. Boylston. We called at Mr. Curtis’ for him and arrived at Weston before eleven, it being twenty miles at least. The farm appears in tolerable condition since the tenants undertook it, and though it is pretty much a dead weight upon his hands, all he would wish would be that it did not run him in debt. After going over it and seeing the ordinary condition in which it is, we returned so as to reach Quincy by half past three o’clock. The day was favourable to our horses, it being cloudy and with appearance of rain. Passed an hour in the garden looking at the peach trees, the appearance of { 410 } which is really disheartening. And my father although a fine theorist has not the least practical and useful knowledge in the world. My time is so taken up as to make me unable to attend to it. So the garden is likely to go to ruin. Attempted a little of Bishop Burnet without success. William E. Foster brought his sister out here, Elizabeth,1 who remains on a visit to Louisa C. Smith. Mr. Coggins, a man from West Chester, Pa. called to see the House and my Father. Curiosity, but he seemed unassuming so it pleased me to indulge him. Evening, fatigued and went to bed very early.
1. They were children of James H. Foster (JQA to LCA, 31 July 1829, Adams Papers).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/