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Browsing: Diary of Charles Francis Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0015

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-15

Saturday. 15th.

We were visited early this morning with the most severe thunderstorm that I have heard or seen for many years. It was longer and heavier than usual, remaining over us for more than two hours and with incessant flashes of lightning. One house was struck in the town and a fire was visible in the distance. The bell of the Meeting house began to ring and the fury of the storm, the quietness of the Country visible in the strong glare of the light when it poured from the Clouds, with the melancholy but alarming tone of the bell, presented a scene equal to the strongest imagination. I was sleepless for three hours and arose still tired and exhausted. To Boston. Morning at the Office, excepting when I was engaged in a number of commissions given me for the morning, purchasing Carpets and other things for the House at Quincy. Mr. Curtis called upon me, and gave me a deed to draw for the Estate of Mr. Boylston at the same time retaining me as Conveyancer in general which is a good place. Dined in town. Afternoon rather wasted. Why I do not know, but I feel now too much disarranged to do much. To Medford. Found Abby and the family well. { 419 } Pleasant Evening. Abby was affectionate and I enjoyed myself altogether very much.

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0016

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-16

Sunday. 16th.

Morning at home. As it is the ettiquette for a lady not to go to public places after she is published to be married, Abby did not attend at Meeting and we spent the day together. I was occupied in writing her Invitation Cards for the reception of her company. On the whole, I have seldom enjoyed myself more. She was extremely affectionate and her playful yet perfectly simple manner was fascinating as it was sincere. The day has little else to render it remarkable. In the afternoon, Mr. and Mrs. Everett were here and Edward B. Hall, the Clergyman of Northampton who is a Nephew of Mr. Brooks.1 The former persons have just returned from this place, where they have been for some purposes, no body knows what. Mr. Frothingham truly said yesterday, that he (Mr. E.) never did any thing without a purpose. Evening, Conversation with Abby—Character, warmth of it. We mutually complain of the want of it in each other, which is one of those cases where not much comes of [it?]. Pleasant enough.
1. Edward B. Hall, Harvard 1820, was Congregational minister at Northampton (Mass. Register, 1829, p. 114).

Docno: ADMS-13-02-02-0005-0008-0017

Author: CFA
Date: 1829-08-17

Monday 17th.

Morning to town accompanied by Mr. Frothingham. Conversation upon the late report of an unfortunate affair between Mr. Webster’s eldest son and his niece. I do not know what to make of it. At the Office. Mr. Ayer the Carpenter called1 and I went up to the House with him to see about the remaining bookcase. Waited for Abby who was there. Mrs. Chardon Brooks came in and I went away. Paid a visit to Mrs. Sidney Brooks at Mrs. Dehon’s. Found there many visitors. Upon going out I met Mrs. Harrison G. Otis. She spoke to me, but the meeting was rather awkward. I hardly knew what to do or say. It was rather fortunate however that I had taken my leave, for the meeting upstairs would have been less pleasant. Returned to the Office. Nothing further occurred, and I left town to dine at Quincy. Found there Miss Welsh and Louisa Smith who worries my life out. It is impossible for a woman to be better constituted to fatigue others than she is. Much of the afternoon was passed in reading and studying the deed which I propose to draw for Mr. Curtis. Evening quiet. General conversation upon Astronomy. My father received letters from { 420 } Washington, announcing their probable departure on Sunday which is earlier than was expected.
1. Thomas Ayers, who lived at 23 Chambers Street (Boston Directory, 1829–1830).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/