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Browsing: Diary of John Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0002

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-02

2 Wednesday.

Went to Spencer in the afternoon.—When we come into the World, our minds are destitute of all Sorts of Ideas. Our senses inform us of various Qualities in the substances around us. As we grow up our Acquaintance with Things enlarges and spreads. Colours are painted in our minds through our Eyes. All the various Modulations of Sounds, enter by our Ears. Fragrance and Fœtor, are perceived by the Smell, Extention and Bulk by the Touch. These Ideas that enter simple and uncompounded thro our Senses are called simple Ideas, because they are absolutely one and indivisible. Thus the Whiteness of Snow can not be divided or seperated into 2 or more Whitenesses. The same may { [facing 32] } { [facing 33] } { 33 } be said of all other Colours. It is indeed in our Power to mix and compound Colours into new and more beautiful Appearances, than any that are to be found in Nature. So We can combine various Sounds into one melodious Tune. In Short we can modify and dispose the Simple Ideas of Sensation, into whatever shape we please. But these Ideas can enter our minds no other Way but thro the senses. A man born blind will never gain one Idea of Light or Colour. One born deaf will never get an Idea of sound.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0003

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-03

3 Thurdsday.

Heard Mr. Maccarty preach the Lecture, drank Tea with him, and spent the Evening at the Majors.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0004

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-04

4 Friday.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0005

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-05

5 Saturday.

Dreamed away the afternoon.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0006

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-06

6 Sunday.

Heard Mr. Maccarty all Day. Drank Tea at home with Crawford. Spent the Evening at home with Mr. Maccarty and Capt. Doolittle.1 A great deal of Thunder and Lightning.
1. Ephraim Doolittle, on whom JA has much more to say in his Autobiography.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0007

Author: Adams, John
DateRange: 1756-06-07 - 1756-06-13

7[–13] Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurdsday, Fryday, Saturday, Sunday.

Docno: ADMS-01-01-02-0002-0006-0008

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1756-06-14

14 Monday.

Drank Tea at Mr. Putnams. Spent the Evening at the Majors, with Esqrs. Chandler of Woodstock and Brewer of Worcester.—He is not a wise man and is unfit to fill any important Station in Society, that has left one Passion in his Soul unsubdued. The Love of Glory will make a General sacrifice the Interest of his Nation, to his own Fame. Avarice exposes some to Corruption and all to a Thousand meannesses and villanies destructive to Society. Love has deposed lawful Kings, and aggrandiz’d unlawful, ill deserving Courtiers. Envy is more Studious of eclipsing the Lustre of other men by indirect Strategems, than of brightening its own Lustre by great and meritorious Actions. These Passions should be bound fast and brought under the Yoke. Untamed they are lawless Bulls, they roar and bluster, defy all Controul, and { 34 } some times murder their proper owner. But properly inured to Obedience, they take their Places under the Yoke without Noise and labour vigorously in their masters Service. From a sense of the Government of God, and a Regard to the Laws established by his Providence, should all our Actions for ourselves or for other men, primarily originate. And This master Passion in a good mans soul, like the larger Fishes of Prey will swallow up and destroy all the rest.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/