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Browsing: Diary of John Quincy Adams, Volume 2


Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0008

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-08

8th.

Attended at the office; and wrote diligently, all day. Cold weather coming on apace. Thomson and I had some conversation, before we left the office at night. He is in low spirits, and sees gloomy prospects. I hope he will realize more happy ones, { 302 } for he is an amiable worthy youth, with a clear head and a sound heart. From the office we went to Putnam's lodgings. There Sam, and I, play'd, to-gether, he on the violin, I on the flute, for a couple of hours. After which, we sat with him till 9 o'clock, and then respectively retired.
I sought my bed quite early this evening. I cannot study now much in my own room for want of a fire.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0009

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-09

9th.

I received a short letter from W. Cranch.
I make a pretty rapid progress with my book of forms, and if I am not interrupted, I hope to finish it by the latter end of next week which will take one heavy load from my shoulders: Putnam came to our office this afternoon; he and Little pass'd the evening with me. I intended to walk with Little but found it was raining hard. I proceed very slowly with Blackstone.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0010

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-10

10th.

A very fine day. Amory and Townsend with a number of other lads went out of town this afternoon upon a party: But I did not feel disposed to join them. Thomson spent part of the evening with me.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0011

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-11

11th.

This afternoon I took a ride with Dr. Kilham, as far as Newtown to see Mr. Dalton, but neither he nor his lady were at home. We rode a mile or two beyond that, and returned just after dark: that road is very good and the prospects all around are very beautiful; but the leaves begin to fall, and the year appears to proceed rapidly on a decline. Amory was with me part of the evening.

Docno: ADMS-03-02-02-0002-0010-0012

Author: Adams, John Quincy
Date: 1787-10-12

12th.

The day pass'd as usual, except, that I had some political chat with Mr. Parsons. He favours very much the federal constitution, which has lately been proposed by the Convention of the States. Nor do I wonder at all that he should approve of it, as it is calculated to increase the influence, power and wealth of those who have any already. If the Constitution be adopted it will be a { 303 } grand point gained in favour of the aristocratic party: there are to be no titles of nobility; but there will be great distinctions; and those distinctions will soon be hereditary, and we shall consequently have nobles, but no titles. For my own part I am willing to take my chance under any government whatever, but it is hard to give up a System which I have always been taught to cherish, and to confess, that a free government is inconsistent with human nature.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/