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Browsing: Legal Papers of John Adams, Volume 1


Docno: ADMS-05-01-02-0008-0002-0003

Author: Paine, Robert Treat
Date: 1766-10

Paine's Minutes of the Argument1

Plymouth Court of General Sessions, October 1766

Plympton vs. Middleborough
Warninig.
Shurtleffe. J. Mar[shall] went from Plym[pton] to Mid[dleborough] 21. Dec. 1753.
Mr. Josiah Marshal. Came to Plymp[ton] Augt. 1747 till 20th Novr. 1753.2 Then to Midd[leborough], returned to Ply[mpton] 7th July 1758. Was Grammar School Master at Midd[leborough]. I went to Pembroke 4 yr. ago and kept school there 2 yr. and 2 months.
Capt. Sprout. Mr. Marshal kept School at Midd[leborough] 5 years.
Adams
Pity there should be a dispute.
Warrant of Warning no Seal no mention made of his Wife and children, not to depart within 14 days. A man and his family means nothing more than the man; Marshals Wife was born at Plymton.
Warrant to remove, not setting forth the cause, given by a Justice in the same Town
Strange. 1163.3
1. In Paine's hand. Paine Law Notes.
2. Thus in MS. JA's notes read 10 November.
3. That is, Greate Charte v. Kennington, note 53 above. Paine has erroneously written “1163.”

Docno: ADMS-05-01-02-0008-0003-0001

Editorial Note

In August 1768, William Dix, a pauper, was removed from Boston to Chelsea by virtue of the warrant of John Hill, a Boston justice of the peace. The selectmen of Chelsea petitioned the Suffolk General Sessions in April 1769 for his return to Boston and for reimbursement of their expenses in his behalf. The petition, which was drafted by John Adams and is printed below, urged that Dix was not an inhabitant of Chelsea, and had not been alleged or adjudged to be such in the removal proceedings. Adams also raised the point that Justice Hill was disqualified by virtue of his residence in Boston.
The case was heard at a May adjournment of the court and then continued. In August, at an adjournment of the July term, the court was “unanimously of opinion that Justice Hill who granted the warrant men• { 298 } tioned in said Petition, being at that time an inhabitant of said town of Boston had no legal power so to do and therefore that the prayer of the Petition be granted.” Boston was accordingly ordered to pay Chelsea its charges of £20 7s. 4d. and costs of £5 18s. 2d., and to accept Dix back.1
1. Sess. Min. Bk., Aug. 1769. As to the question of an interested judge, see No. 25, notes 5–73, 4, and 5; No. 27, text at notes 11–14.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/