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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 11


Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0303

Author: MacCreery, William
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1781-07-07

From William MacCreery

[salute] Dear Sir

I am not skill'd in writing introductory Letters—I must however write one to make you acquainted with a Gentleman whose conversation you will find, at least, very agreeable. In these intrigueing times, when Politicians are obliged to Speak with caution in all companies, look at all Men with a suspicious Eye, and speak to them { 407 } with reserve, an introduction becomes very Necessary, as it is apt to set each party at ease. The Barron de Poellnitz will have the Honor of delivering this Letter to you.1 He is allready an American by principal, and waits most impatiently for a favorable moment to make himself and Family so by residence, having waited above a Year at this place for that purpose. I must therefore beg of you to admit him to your confidence and Freindship, being persuaded you will find the obligation mutual.
There is an American Packet at the bottom of this River, in order to proffit of the convoy which is just ready to depart for the West India Islands. She is bound to Boston, and I purpose taking a passage in her. Shou'd I arrive according to my expectations, I shall inform Mrs. Adams that I had lately the pleasure of seeing you well.
I have the Honor to be with the greatest respect and esteem Dear Sir Your very Obedient Humble Servant
[signed] Will MacCreery2
1. The Baron de Pöllnitz probably delivered this letter on 3 Sept., the date on which he wrote a brief note to JA requesting a meeting (Adams Papers).
2. For a brief sketch of William MacCreery, a Baltimore merchant, see vol. 5:299.

Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0304-0001

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Rayneval, Joseph Mathias Gérard de
Date: 1781-07-09

To Joseph Mathias Gérard de Rayneval

[salute] Sir

I have this Moment the Honour of your Billet of this Days Date:1 and will do myself the Honour, to wait on his Excellency the Comte de Vergennes, at his office, on Wednesday next at Nine of the Clock in the Morning, according to his Desire. I have the Honour to be with much Esteem sir Your humble and obedient servant
[signed] John Adams
RC (Arch. Aff. Etr., Paris, Corr. Pol., E.-U., vol. 17:312); endorsed: “[ . . . ]na previènt de [arr]ivée et qu'il va [ . . . ]dre à Versailles.” LbC's (Adams Papers). The first of two Letterbook copies is written on the same sheet of paper as JA's letter to Vergennes of 7 July, above, tipped into Lb/JA/16 (Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 104). The second Letterbook copy is entered in Lb/JA/17 (same, Reel No. 105). The memorandum appears immediately below the second Letterbook copy.
1. Rayneval informed JA that the Comte de Vergennes wished to meet with him on 11 July (Adams Papers).

Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0304-0002

Author: Adams, John
Date: 1781-07-09

Enclosure: John Adams' Memorandum

Accordingly on Wednesday I went to Versailles and met the Count at his office with Mr. Rayneval at 9 o Clock, who communicated to me, the following Articles, proposed by the two Imperial Courts,1—that Spain had prepared her Answer—that of France was near ready—did not know that England had yet answered.
RC (Arch. Aff. Etr., Paris, Corr. Pol., E.-U., vol. 17:312); endorsed: “[ . . . ]na previènt de [arr]ivée et qu'il va [ . . . ]dre à Versailles.” LbC's (Adams Papers) The first of two Letterbook copies is written on the same sheet of paper as JA's letter to Vergennes { 408 } of 7 July, above, tipped into Lb/JA/16 (Adams Papers, Microfilms, Reel No. 104). The second Letterbook copy is entered in Lb/JA/17 (same, Reel No. 105). The memorandum appears immediately below the second Letterbook copy.
The content of all or some notes that appeared on this page in the printed volume has been moved to the end of the preceding document.
1. See JA's copy of the Austro-Russian proposal for Anglo-American peace negotiations, [11 July], below. When JA published the articles in the Boston Patriot in 1809, he included additional information about his meeting at Versailles:
“These articles were given me in French, and they graciously condescended to let me see the original communication from the two Imperial Courts as far and no farther than these three articles extended. All the rest was carefully covered up with a book. I desired to see and have a copy of the whole; but no, that could not be permitted.
“I returned to Paris, where I was alone. Congress had taken from me my bosom friend, my fellow traveller and fellow sufferer, in whose society I always found satisfaction, and in whose enlightened counsels, ample assistance and confidence, Mr. Dana, and sent him on a mission to Russia. My private secretary, Mr. Thaxter, I was obliged to leave in charge of my family and affairs in Holland. I had therefore every thing to write, translate and copy with my own hand”
(JA, Corr. in the Boston Patriot, p. 110).
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/