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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 11


Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0032

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: President of Congress
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Date: 1781-01-15

To the President of Congress

Duplicate

[salute] Sir

Zealand is still endeavouring to divert the Republick from its Interest and its Duty, to embarrass its Operations and involve it in disgrace and ruin.
The Directors of the Company of Commerce, and that of Insurance, and a great Number of Merchants, established at Middlebourg in Zealand, have presented a Petition to the States General, to supplicate their high Mightinesses to try again the Way of Negotiation, to endeavour to prevent by this means the damages with which the Subjects of the Republick are still threatened by a War with England, and to come to a friendly Accommodation. This Petition has been supported by a Resolution of the States of Zealand, transmitted to the Assembly of the States General: but it is said that this Petition has been rendered Commissorial, and will not be taken into Consideration, unless the English should make some Propositions of Peace.1
The State of the Marine of this Republick, during the Year 1781, as it has been proposed by the Petition of the Council of State, is of two Vessels of seventy Guns and five hundred and fifty Men; nine of sixty Guns and four hundred and fifty Men; fifteen of fifty Guns and three hundred Men; two of forty Guns and two hundred and seventy Men; one of forty Guns and two hundred and fifty Men; fourteen of thirty six Guns and two hundred and thirty Men; thirteen of twenty Guns and one hundred and fifty Men, five Sloops, one Hospital Ship, four Packet Boats, twelve large armed Vessels, sixteen smaller, making in the whole ninety four Ships and eighteen thousand four hundred and ninety Seamen.2
I have the Honour to be, with the greatest Respect, Sir, your most obedient & humble Servant.
[signed] John Adams
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, Misc. Papers, Reel No. 1, f. 228–230); endorsed: “Letter Jany 15. 1781 John Adams Read 19 Novr.”
{ 51 }
1. For JA's analysis of Zeeland's opposition to Dutch accession to the armed neutrality and war with England, see his letter to the president of Congress, 30 Dec. 1780 (vol. 10:458–463). For the resolutions of the provincial states of Zeeland and the merchants of Middelburg, see the Gazette de Leyde of 16 January.
2. This list appeared in the Gazette de Leyde of 9 January.

Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0033

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: President of Congress
Recipient: Huntington, Samuel
Date: 1781-01-15

To the President of Congress

Duplicate

[salute] Sir

Congress will not expect me to write upon the Subject of Peace at this time, when the Flames of War are spreading far and wide, with more rapidity than ever: and I have no comfortable Tidings on the Subject of Money.
In the first place, I believe there is not so much Money here as the World imagines: in the next place, those who have what there is, have no Confidence in any Nation or Individual. All Credit seems at a Stand.
The Republick will want a Loan. The Northern Neutral Powers will want Loans, and even a Loan will be wanted to support the Credit of a Number of Houses in the Mercantile Way, which are affected by the violent and sudden Revolution of the times, and by the pyratical depredations of the English.1 I hope Therefore that Congress will not venture to draw here, untill they have certain Information that they may draw with Safety.2
I have the Honour to be, with the greatest Respect, Sir, your most obedient and most humble Servant.
[signed] John Adams
RC in John Thaxter's hand (PCC, Misc. Papers, Reel No. 1, f. 234–235); endorsed: “Letter Jany 15. 1781 John Adams Read 19 Novr.” MS (MdHi); endorsed: “Amsterdam Jany. 15. 1781.” The manuscript at the Maryland Historical Society is likely the intended recipient's copy.
1. JA's comments regarding finances in general and the situation of the Dutch mercantile houses in particular may be the result of his visit on this date to the Amsterdam merchants Jean de Neufville and Daniel Crommelin (JA, Diary and Autobiography, 2:455).
2. In the Maryland Historical Society copy, JA follows this sentence with: “At Present there is not a Single Ducat nor a Prospect of one.”

Docno: ADMS-06-11-02-0034-0001

Author: Dumas, Charles William Frederic
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1781-01-15

From C. W. F. Dumas

[salute] Honoured & dear Sir

I cannot find a french form to adress you at the head of my Letters which pleases so much to my heart as this English. Give me leave { 52 } therefore to make use of it even when I write to you in French, which, you know, is more easy to me.
Le Comte de Welderen, et son Epouse, sont de retour ici. Ce qui, comme vous voyez, dément l'opinion, où étoient certaines gens, qu'il Se tiendroit à portée de S. J. Y.1 Il a un frere à Mastricht; et il s'est détourné pour le voir en passant, et probablement pour épargner à Madame le passage du Mordyk. La politique du public a cherché finesse dans son petit délai de paroître ici. Cela arrive plus souvent qu'on ne pense.
Je crois qu'il y a de l'exagération dans le nombre des vaisseaux pris par les Anglois. Je n'ai point entendu parlé des 10,000 qu'on doit envoyer en Zélande, où il y a déjà des garnisons, qu'on renforcera sans doute, mais non de 10,000 h. Si j'apprends quelque chose là-dessus, vous le saurez. En attendant, defiez-vous toujours de la politique de la Bourse, pour plusieurs raisons, comme je me défie de mon côté des bruits qu'on fait courir ici; par exemple, que la Maison H–2 d'Amsterdam auroit souscrit pour 2 millions St. dans le nouvel emprunt des Angl.
Je vous remercie, Monsieur, des nouvelles que vous avez la bonté de me communiquer, et j'en ferai usage.
Je reviens de diverses visites. Personne ne sait rien ici des 10,000 h. pour la Zélande.
Je suis avec beaucoup de respect & d'attachement Monsieur Votre très-humble & très-obéissant serviteur
[signed] Dumas
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/