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Browsing: Papers of John Adams, Volume 13


Docno: ADMS-06-13-02-0238

Author: Warren, James
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1782-10-07

From James Warren

[salute] My dear Sir

Your Letters of the 17th. June and 2d. of July have given me great pleasure, perhaps more because they were Unexpected. A Spirit of Jealousy founded on a long Intermission had made me suppose you had totally forgot me? and never Intended again to write a Single Line. I hope the reasons you give for so long silence are by the fine Air of the Hague, and by Exercise removed and that I shall again { 519 } frequently hear from you in this way. One thing you may be Assured of that you cant write to a More sincere and determined Friend. I Like my New Allies the Dutch very well, and when my Imagination roves into futurity, and Speculates and Combines, I can suppose they may do us as much real service as some Others, and from Motives quite as disinterested, and I like the Alliance perhaps the better because it has been formed by an Independent Statesman, in spite of the false politics of his own Country, and the designing politics of others, and I trust he will be regarded even by the present Generation in spite of the rascally Venality or Envy of those who from their Exalted Stations have A greater oppy. of doing him Justice. But my Friend the divine Science of Politics is Composed of the same Materials here as in Europe. There is indeed something Exceedingly singular in your Country. None ever rose with more rapid Strides, or was more distinguished by its virtue and public spirit, and no Country ever Catched the Vices of Others and degenerated so fast. I will not prevent your Singing or laughing by Attempting A description or saying more on this Subject. I wish for Peace but what kind of one must we have had, if it had been made this Year. I wish to see you return to our Hills. I shall certainly take pleasure in roveing with you among the Partridges, Squirrels &c, and will even venture upon an Emulation with you which shall make his Hill shine the brightest, tho I believe I should fail in the Attempt. I Expect Notwithstanding all your great Engagement, and the great Game you have to Play, the Splendor of Courts and the Entertainments of Princes and Princesses that you will bring with you great Improvents in the delightful Science of Husbandry, do Ascertain [wha]t Marle is that we may know w[het]her we have it here or not.1 I can tell you no News but what you will have more directly from other hands. They may tell you how our Constitution operates in practice how our Executive support their dignity, and how our Legislature preserve their Independence. I am quite a private Man a distant Spectator that sees but Little enough however to feel some disgust, detestation, and Contempt. The Papers will shew you in what manner Mr Temple is persecuted here, and his defence, this matter has formed Considerable Parties and I think Temple gains Ground fast.2 I need not Tell you, that your Family are well. You will undoubtedly hear from them by this Oppy.3

[salute] I am Yr Friend &c &c

The Muse Mrs. W. wishes you Health, and Happiness.
{ 520 }
I Beg your Care of the Inclosed it Contains one for my Son—I wish to go safely, and am told there is no dependence on the Common Post from Amsterdam to France.
RC (Adams Papers); addressed: “His Excellency John Adams Esqr The Hague”; endorsed: “Warren Oct. 7. 1782.” Some loss of text where the seal was removed.
1. A type of soil consisting of clay and calcium carbonate that is used as fertilizer (OED).
2. This was, in the words of Cotton Tufts, the “Paper War” between John Temple and James Sullivan over Temple's motives in returning to America in 1781. For JA's role in Temple's return and the controversy that erupted on his arrival, see JA's 16 Aug. 1781 letter to the president of Congress, and note 1 and references there (vol. 11:449–452).
3. Probably the Sukey, captained by Moses Grinnel. AA intended to send her letter of 8 Oct. by that means (AFC, 5:4), and Isaac Smith indicated in his of the 9th, below, that Grinnel was the bearer.

Docno: ADMS-06-13-02-0239

Author: Adams, John
Recipient: Ridley, Matthew
Date: 1782-10-08

To Matthew Ridley

[salute] Sir

I recd your favor of 29 Ult, with its Inclosure, last night. Great News indeed. Inclosed is an answer.1 This Day at Noon, I Am to meet the Lords the Deputies of their High Mightinesses, to Sign the Treaty.2 It has been delayed Sometime, in order to have the Silver Boxes for the Seals made with Suitable Elegance and Dignity for the Taste of these magnificent Republicans, too much of the Dignity of this Country consists you know in Silver and Gold and Diamonds.3 As there will be five or Six of these Boxes, I hope Congress will coin them Up to carry on the War.
1. The enclosure to Ridley's letter of 29 Sept., above, was John Jay's letter of 28 Sept. (Adams Papers), for which see note 2 to Ridley's letter. In his reply to Jay of 7 Oct., above, the enclosed “answer” referred to here, JA indicated that Jay's letter, and thus Ridley's letter of the 29th, had arrived on the 6th, rather than on the 7th as he indicates in this letter to Ridley.
2. For JA's account of the signing of the treaty, see his letter of 8 Oct. to Robert R. Livingston (The Negotiation of the Dutch-American Treaty of Amity and Commerce, 22 Aug. – 8 Oct., No. XI, above).
3. No indication as to the fate of the silver boxes has been found.

Docno: ADMS-06-13-02-0240

Author: Smith, Isaac Sr.
Recipient: Adams, John
Date: 1782-10-09

From Isaac Smith Sr.

[salute] Sr

I wrote you by Via france, lately, but beleive the Ship is not saild (cald the Marquis Fayetta)1 on Account of Our Coast being very much infested with Cruzers, the brige. Capt Hales who came from Holland with the bearer Capt Grinnel was taken in Our bay and { 521 } Carrd. to Bermudas, att which place great many Vessells are carried.2
The french fleet are here fiting, and will leave considerable of money which is the Only service they do us as they never have been Out, when three or four, might, as they were not damagd but are now going to take a turn in the bay. Capt Manley command the Hague formerly the Dean, (Nicholson being suspended) who is going Out with them on a Cruize.3
The British got of Capt Letouch Ship in the Delaware, they got chief of the money a shore, all to about Forty thousd Crowns, but the Capt and people were taken.4 By a person from Phila. there is a report and suppose itt to be true, that a party salled Out from Charlestown to supprize a party of Our but were driven back with loss on their side and some on Our's Amongst which was Colo Laurence.
Itt is supposd. Charlestown is Avacuated by this.
A Vessell Arrd last week att Providence that came Out with the Firebrand Capt. Trowbridge which we here nothing of as yet and itts to be feard, will fall into the Enemies hands.5 The Pilgrim which has run clear for some Years was run ashore att C. Codd the day after she saild (a few days since).6
Yesterday was a Storm of rain, and more fell than has att any One time for 3 or 4 mo. having had the longest drout ever known, some people in the Country have been Oblidgd to go 20 Miles to Mill.
I did not know of this Vessells going so soon and yesterday could not get an Opportunity to send Mrs Adams word and as the bag is to be taken down this forenoon and the Vessell going down, itts Not possible to get her word, so that I suppose she does not write you unless she has intrusted her letters with any Other person.
Mrs. Adams and family were well, they have lately been to Haverhill Mr. Gardner the Treasurer dyd, two days Ago with a Violent fever.
There has been an Assistant Treasurer Mr Thos Jones7 who is very capable and who has been consollidating all securites equal to Specie, so that the goverment are Endeavoring to know what they really Owe and itt will not be so much as was expected, itts said. One Million and half Dls and the goverment are laying excise's so as to pay the Interest which iff they can do they wont want money and the Court is doing every thing they can for that Valuable End.

[salute] I Am will wishing you a confirmd. state of health Yr M H sert

[signed] Isaac Smith
{ 522 }
1. Probably Smith's letter of 7 Sept. (AFC, 4:378–379), which he apparently had intended to go by way of the Marquis de la Fayette, Capt. John Buffington. An advertisement in the Boston Independent Chronicle of 19 Sept. indicated that the vessel intended to sail for France on the 20th.
2. Neither the ship nor the captain has been otherwise identified, but the Salem Gazette of 10 Oct. reported that a Captain Hale was among the 62 prisoners from Salem, Boston, and Gloucester that arrived in a cartel from Bermuda on 3 October.
3. Owing to Silas Deane's apparent treachery, the Deane had been renamed the Hague in Sept. (Dict. Amer. Fighting Ships). The reason for Samuel Nicholson's suspension from command and replacement by John Manley is unknown, but he was acquitted by a court martial in 1783 (DAB). News of Manley's appointment to command the Hague appeared in various Boston newspapers, including the Independent Chronicle of 26 September.
4. This was the French frigate Aigle, for which see Matthew Ridley's letter of 13 July, note 2, above. The incident was reported in the Boston newspapers essentially as given here by Smith (Boston Gazette, 23 Sept).
5. AA also expressed apprehension over the fate of the Firebrand in her letter to JA of 8 Oct. (AFC, 5:6), but the Boston Gazette of 14 Oct. indicated that it had arrived sometime in the past week.
6. The Independent Chronicle of 10 Oct. reported that the privateer Pilgrim, out of Beverly, had been run aground on Cape Cod by the British fifty-gun ship Chatham and destroyed, but that the crew had escaped.
7. This may be an inadvertence. No mention of Thomas Jones has been found, but Thomas Ivers had been appointed to serve as assistant treasurer during Henry Gardner's illness, for which see Samuel Cooper's letter of 22 July, and note 3, above.
Cite web page as: Founding Families: Digital Editions of the Papers of the Winthrops and the Adamses, ed.C. James Taylor. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2014.
http://www.masshist.org/apde2/