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Letter from William Black of the Committee of Correspondence, James River County, Virginia, to the Boston Committee of Donations (copy in letterbook volume 2), 22 December 1774, pages 94-95

Letter from William Black of the Committee of Correspondence, James River County, Virginia, to the Boston Committee of Donations (copy in letterbook volume 2), 22 December 1774, pages 94-95

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Depend on the Virginians
As the fall of 1774 passes into winter, American colonists are left to wonder how Britain will respond to the recent activities of the Continental Congress. Delegates have proposed a comprehensive plan of commercial resistance known as the "Continental Association." Seeing no harm in trying multiple approaches, delegates also send a petition to King George III, asking him to intercede in Parliament on the colonies' behalf. Meanwhile, the Coercive Acts are still in force in Massachusetts, and Bostonians still struggle to survive despite the closure of their harbor. Fortunately, their sister colonies continue to send physical and moral support throughout the winter of 1774-1775. The question still remains: Will Parliament repeal the Coercive Acts?

View the Letter from Samuel Adams of the Boston Committee of Donations to William Black of James River County, Virginia.

Questions to Consider

1. 1. What goods are sent as donations?

2. What is rumored to be preventing exports from going south?

3. What colonel has taken command of 1,000 Virginian volunteers?

4. What was thrown into York River?

Further Exploration

5. How might the continued closure of Boston's ports affect daily life? Would market prices change? How would households have to adapt?