Membership

The Massachusetts Historical Society has two membership categories—Fellows and Members. Both groups are important to the life of the Society. Fellows and Members help support the Society's mission and receive benefits such as a subscription to our annual journal, the Massachusetts Historical Review, and invitations to special events.

Members

Membership at the MHS is open to all with an interest in American history. The Society welcomes Members from near and far to join its community of history lovers. The MHS offers a handful of different membership categories aimed to encourage participation in its various activities. Learn how to become a Member or renew your membership now.

Fellows

Election as a Fellow of the MHS is an honor bestowed by the Society on distinguished scholars and civic leaders. The Fellows are the legal governing body of the MHS, and therefore have the privilege of shaping the Society. Learn more about the MHS Fellows or renew your Fellow dues.



Join Us at an Upcoming Program

Public Program Over There: The Boys Who Went to Fight and the Women Who Endured 7 January 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) In the last weeks that the Massachusetts Historical Society is displaying the WWI exhibition &ldquo ...

“Over There:  The Boys Who Went to Fight and the Women Who Endured.”In the last weeks that the Massachusetts Historical Society is displaying the WWI exhibition “Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country,” we will host two events that explore the cultural and musical history of the time. The first program will be an approximately 70 minute program of songs telling the story of the U.S.’s involvement in WWI and its effects on the women, men and children.  Starting from before the U.S. entered the war until after the war when the “boys came home”, the program will feature some of the most popular songs of the era including “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary”, “Till We Meet Again”, “Oh How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning”, “Over There” and “How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm.”

Benjamin Sears & Bradford Conner have been called “Boston’s favorite song duo” by the Boston Globe, and “the delightful cabaret team” by the Boston Phoenix.  Recipients of IRNE (Independent Reviewers of New England) and LIP (Life in Provincetown) awards, they have performed as a duo since 1989, carrying on the great cabaret tradition of “the song, the singer, and the pianist”.  They are noted recording artists with a discography which features many previously unrecorded songs by Irving Berlin, the Gershwins, and E.Y. Harburg. 

Cynthia Mork, mezzo-soprano, is a performer of classical repertoire, American popular song and jazz, appearing around greater Boston and New England in a variety of concerts, recitals, operas, and other engagements. A vocal student of soprano Sue Ellen Kuzma for over ten years, she studied vocal performance as an undergraduate and was a student of tenor Jon Humphrey.  She currently resides with her husband and son in Bedford, MA.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
Public Program Here Comes America-WWI Performance by the Boston Saxophone Quartet 21 January 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) The Boston Saxophone Quartet, a unique blend of musicians combining a range of repertoire, will ...

Boston Saxophone QuartetThe Boston Saxophone Quartet, a unique blend of musicians combining a range of repertoire, will perform a selection of songs taking the audience through the musical landscape of World War One. This will include selections of music from both sides of the Atlantic before the war, songs that show the changing attitudes of Americans to the war, patriotic songs, and finally songs reflecting on the impact of the war. After all, “How Ya Gonna Keep 'em Down on the Farm After They've Seen Paree”? Members of the BSQ have performed with the Boston Pops and Boston Symphony Orchestra and leading Broadway theaters throughout New England.

  • Most of Tom Ferrante's performing career has been in the orchestras of the Colonial, Wang and Schubert Theaters of Boston. Other credits include membership in the Herb Pomeroy Jazz Orchestra, The Viola Premier Saxophone Quartet, and the Greg Hopkins Big Band.  A former Director of Bands for Waltham (MA) High School, Tom has been featured jazz clarinet soloist with the Boston Pops Orchestra for the past twenty seasons.
  • As an accomplished woodwind doubler on oboe, English horn, flute, saxophone, and clarinet,  Rod Ferland can often be heard and seen in the orchestra pit of Boston's Wang, Shubert and Colonial Theaters performing for Broadway productions.  Rod has also performed with the Boston Lyric Opera, the Boston Pops, Boston Symphony Orchestra and the North Shore Music Theater.  He was a former faculty member at Berklee College of Music.
  • Bob Bowlby is an active woodwind doubler and a Theater pit musician at Boston's Colonial, Wang, Shubert, Opera House and NSMT in Beverly.  He has been Lead alto with Buddy Rich, Frank Sinatra, Artie Shaw Orch and plays with the Boston Pops. Currently, he is a member of John Allmark Jazz Orchestra.
  • Sharing a dual performing career as an instrumentalist and conductor, Peter Cokkinias has conducted the Boston Ballet, Boston Pops, Springfield Symphony (MA), and the Atlantic Sinfonietta (NY).  He has performed with the Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Ballet, and Cincinnati, Hartford, Pittsburgh, and Boston Symphony Orchestras.  Presently, Dr. Cokkinias is Music Director/Conductor of the Metrowest Symphony Orchestra (MA) since 1979,  Professor at Berklee College of Music and is a woodwind doubler at the North Shore Music Theater in Beverly (MA) and Colonial and Wang Theaters in Boston (MA) and PPAC in Providence (RI).

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
Public Program John & Abigail: A Life in Letters 24 January 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Co-Sponsored by the Abigail Adams Historical Society Immerse yourself in the lives of John & Abigail Adams! This hands-on workshop will (re)introduce ...

Immerse yourself in the lives of John & Abigail Adams! This hands-on workshop will (re)introduce participants to the famous couple and their rich correspondence. What can these letters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Over the course of two Saturdays in January we will explore topics such education, women’s rights, and the challenges John and Abigail faced as a young family living through a revolution. Participants will have the opportunity to view treasures from the Society’s collections and tour the Abigail Adams Birthplace in Weymouth. This program is open to all K-12 educators, as well as history enthusiasts. Teachers can earn 10 PDPs.

Fee: $50 per person

For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

To register: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

Saturday, January 24 at the Massachusetts Historical Society

  • Analyze documents from the 1770s and 1780s. What, according to Abigail, was “the decisive day… on which the fate of America depends”? Did John “Remember the Ladies”?
  • View original Adams manuscripts from the Society's collections.
  • Try your hand at transcribing eighteenth-century Adams letters and diaries.

Saturday, January 31 at the Abigail Adams Birthplace

  • Tour the Abigail Adams Birthplace
  • Discover and discuss the historical, cultural, and ethical role of women in early America.
  • Explore the relationships forged between Thomas Jefferson and different members of the Adams family.

Watercolor, circa 1800; birthplace of Abigail (Smith) Adams

details
Public Program The Adams Series - Program One: The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams 29 January 2015.Thursday, all day Please RSVP   6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Phyllis Lee Levin, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) A patriot by birth, John Quincy Adams’s destiny was foreordained. He was not only “The ...

The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams A patriot by birth, John Quincy Adams’s destiny was foreordained. He was not only “The Greatest Traveler of His Age,” but a gifted linguist and diplomat. His world encompassed the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the early and late Napoleonic Age. As an adolescent, he met everyone who was anyone in Europe, including America’s own luminaries, Franklin and Jefferson. Coming back to America he was determined to make his own career, but was soon embarked, at Washington’s appointment, on work aboard. At 50, he returned to America to serve as Secretary of State to President Monroe. He was inaugurated President in 1824, after which he served as a stirring defender of the slaves of the Amistad rebellion and as a member of the House of Representatives from 1831 until his death in 1848. In The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams, Phyllis Lee Levin provides the deeply researched and beautifully written definitive story of the intellectual development of one of the most fascinating and towering early Americans.

Phyllis Lee Levin is the author of several books including Abigail Adams and Edith and Woodrow. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, she has been a reporter, editor, and columnist for The New York Times. As writer and editor at Vogue she wrote a profile of Patricia Nixon whom she interviewed at the White House. She lives in Manhattan. 

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
February
Public Program The Adams Series - Program Two: Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic 5 February 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Charles Edel, Assistant Professor - U.S. Naval War College $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) America “goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy”—John Quincy ...

America “goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy”—John Quincy Adams’s famous words are often quoted to justify noninterference in other nations’ affairs. Yet when he spoke them, Adams was not advocating neutrality or passivity but rather outlining a national policy that balanced democratic idealism with a pragmatic understanding of the young republic’s capabilities and limitations. America’s rise from a confederation of revolutionary colonies to a world power is often treated as inevitable, but Charles N. Edel’s provocative biography of Adams argues that he served as the central architect of a grand strategy that shaped America’s rise. Adams’s particular combination of ideas and policies made him a critical link between the founding generation and the Civil War–era nation of Lincoln. While Adams did not live to see all of his strategy fulfilled, his vision shaped the nation’s agenda for decades afterward and continues to resonate as America pursues its place in the twenty-first-century world.

Charles EdelCharles Edel serves an Assistant Professor of Strategy and Policy at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, R.I., where he focuses on U.S. foreign policy and grand strategy, American political history, and the connections between foreign policy and domestic politics.  He holds a Ph.D. in History from Yale University, and received a B.A. in Classical Civilization from Yale College. He worked at Peking University's Center for International and Strategic Studies as a Henry A. Luce Scholar. Previously, he served in various roles in the U.S. government as a political and counterterrorism analyst, worked as a research associate at the Council of Foreign Relations, and taught high school history in New York.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
Public Program Arts and Crafts Architecture: History and Heritage in New England 11 February 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Maureen Meister, independent art historian $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) Maureen Meister’s new book is the first comprehensive study of the Arts and Crafts ...

Maureen Meister’s new book is the first comprehensive study of the Arts and Crafts architecture in the region. Focusing on the 1890s through the 1920s, she will explain how a group of Boston architects and craftsmen encountered English Arts and Crafts theorists, including John Ruskin and William Morris, and produced exquisite works of their own. Among the architects were Ralph Adams Cram, Lois Lilley Howe, Charles Maginnis, and R. Clipston Sturgis. They were conservative in some respects, promoting designs based on historical precedent and the region's heritage, while they also were forward-looking, blending Arts and Crafts values with Progressive Era idealism. They have left us with a legacy of landmark buildings, honored today in cities and towns across New England.

Maureen Meister is an art historian who writes about American art and architecture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She is the author of Architecture and the Arts and Crafts Movement in Boston: Harvard's H. Langford Warren, 2003, and was volume editor of H. H. Richardson: The Architect, His Peers, and Their Era, 1999. She holds a doctorate from Brown University and an A.B. from Mount Holyoke College. She has taught at Boston area universities, including Lesley, Northeastern, and Tufts.  

details
Public Program The Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity 17 February 2015.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Thomas de Waal, Senior Associate - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915-16 was a brutal mass crime that ...

The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915-16 was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the 20th century. By various estimates, more than a million Armenians were killed and the survivors were scattered across the world. In Great Catastrophe, the eminent scholar and reporter Thomas de Waal looks at the changing narratives and politics of the Armenian Genocide and tells the story of recent efforts by courageous Armenians, Kurds, and Turks to come to terms with the disaster as Turkey enters a new post-Kemalist era. Drawing on archival sources, reportage and moving personal stories, de Waal tells the full story of Armenian-Turkish relations since the Genocide in all its extraordinary twists and turns. He strips away the propaganda to look both at the realities of a terrible crime and also the divisive "politics of genocide" it produced. The book throws light not only on our understanding of Armenian-Turkish relations but also of how mass atrocities and historical tragedies shape contemporary politics.

Thomas de Waal is a writer and scholar on the Caucasus and Black Sea region and currently Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is the author of three books, including The Caucasus: An Introduction. From 1991 to 2000, de Waal worked as a newspaper journalist in Moscow and for the BBC World Service in London.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
Public Program Comic Books in the History Classroom 18 February 2015.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   Learn how to capture your students’ attention and engage their imagination using comic books ...

Learn how to capture your students’ attention and engage their imagination using comic books and graphic novels! Together with a historian we will explore the history of colonial Massachusetts, and hear from artists who have brought this period to life through images. We will also meet with teachers who have used comics in the classroom and brainstorm methods for incorporating them into history and English/language arts lessons. This program is open to all K-12 educators, as well as history enthusiasts. Teachers can earn 5 PDPs.

Fee: $25 per person

For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

To register: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

  • Meet artists who have created and contributed to comic books on the history of colonial America.
  • View original political cartoons and other documents from the Society’s collections.
  • Learn how to incorporate comic books from multiple historical eras into your lesson plans.
details
Public Program The Adams Series - Program Three: The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams: A Cookbook 19 February 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Rosana Y. Wan, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) On November 29, 1798, Abigail Adams wrote “When I look Back upon the Year past, I perceive ...

On November 29, 1798, Abigail Adams wrote “When I look Back upon the Year past, I perceive many, very many causes for thanksgiving, both of a publick and private nature.” Throughout their dialog, John reported on having formal dinners in Europe or delegates in Philadelphia while Abigail grew from a New England wife to the The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail AdamsFirst Lady. By studying "receipts" from 18th century cookbooks, we can paint a portrait of their culinary lives. While together, Abigail once wrote to her sister that her “Good Man is so very fat that [she is] lean as a rale,” before ending the letter “But is dinner time, and I must bid you good by…” While they were separate, they reminded each other of dishes they enjoyed including “rusticrat potatoes” and “fine salmon” while continuing the talk of independence. Rosana Y. Wan will speak about the process of documenting the culinary history of the Adams family and putting together her cookbook.

Rosana Yin-Ting Wan was born in Hong Kong and migrated to the United States as a child. Growing up in Houston, Texas, she began her passion of history by giving short lectures on classical music composers to fellow music class students. She received her B.A. in history from Suffolk University in 2011. As an independent scholar, a museum docent, and a sergeant in the Army National Guard, she continues to pursue her studies in the history of the American Revolution, late 18th century culinary culture, and fine arts. She is the first recipient of the John C. Cavanagh Prize in History at Suffolk University in 2011 and a member of the Phi Alpha Theta (National History Honor Society). She is also a recipient of the 2014 Outstanding New Interpreter Award from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

details
More events
Public Program Over There: The Boys Who Went to Fight and the Women Who Endured 7 January 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

“Over There:  The Boys Who Went to Fight and the Women Who Endured.”In the last weeks that the Massachusetts Historical Society is displaying the WWI exhibition “Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country,” we will host two events that explore the cultural and musical history of the time. The first program will be an approximately 70 minute program of songs telling the story of the U.S.’s involvement in WWI and its effects on the women, men and children.  Starting from before the U.S. entered the war until after the war when the “boys came home”, the program will feature some of the most popular songs of the era including “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary”, “Till We Meet Again”, “Oh How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning”, “Over There” and “How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm.”

Benjamin Sears & Bradford Conner have been called “Boston’s favorite song duo” by the Boston Globe, and “the delightful cabaret team” by the Boston Phoenix.  Recipients of IRNE (Independent Reviewers of New England) and LIP (Life in Provincetown) awards, they have performed as a duo since 1989, carrying on the great cabaret tradition of “the song, the singer, and the pianist”.  They are noted recording artists with a discography which features many previously unrecorded songs by Irving Berlin, the Gershwins, and E.Y. Harburg. 

Cynthia Mork, mezzo-soprano, is a performer of classical repertoire, American popular song and jazz, appearing around greater Boston and New England in a variety of concerts, recitals, operas, and other engagements. A vocal student of soprano Sue Ellen Kuzma for over ten years, she studied vocal performance as an undergraduate and was a student of tenor Jon Humphrey.  She currently resides with her husband and son in Bedford, MA.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

close
Public Program Here Comes America-WWI Performance by the Boston Saxophone Quartet 21 January 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

Boston Saxophone QuartetThe Boston Saxophone Quartet, a unique blend of musicians combining a range of repertoire, will perform a selection of songs taking the audience through the musical landscape of World War One. This will include selections of music from both sides of the Atlantic before the war, songs that show the changing attitudes of Americans to the war, patriotic songs, and finally songs reflecting on the impact of the war. After all, “How Ya Gonna Keep 'em Down on the Farm After They've Seen Paree”? Members of the BSQ have performed with the Boston Pops and Boston Symphony Orchestra and leading Broadway theaters throughout New England.

  • Most of Tom Ferrante's performing career has been in the orchestras of the Colonial, Wang and Schubert Theaters of Boston. Other credits include membership in the Herb Pomeroy Jazz Orchestra, The Viola Premier Saxophone Quartet, and the Greg Hopkins Big Band.  A former Director of Bands for Waltham (MA) High School, Tom has been featured jazz clarinet soloist with the Boston Pops Orchestra for the past twenty seasons.
  • As an accomplished woodwind doubler on oboe, English horn, flute, saxophone, and clarinet,  Rod Ferland can often be heard and seen in the orchestra pit of Boston's Wang, Shubert and Colonial Theaters performing for Broadway productions.  Rod has also performed with the Boston Lyric Opera, the Boston Pops, Boston Symphony Orchestra and the North Shore Music Theater.  He was a former faculty member at Berklee College of Music.
  • Bob Bowlby is an active woodwind doubler and a Theater pit musician at Boston's Colonial, Wang, Shubert, Opera House and NSMT in Beverly.  He has been Lead alto with Buddy Rich, Frank Sinatra, Artie Shaw Orch and plays with the Boston Pops. Currently, he is a member of John Allmark Jazz Orchestra.
  • Sharing a dual performing career as an instrumentalist and conductor, Peter Cokkinias has conducted the Boston Ballet, Boston Pops, Springfield Symphony (MA), and the Atlantic Sinfonietta (NY).  He has performed with the Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Ballet, and Cincinnati, Hartford, Pittsburgh, and Boston Symphony Orchestras.  Presently, Dr. Cokkinias is Music Director/Conductor of the Metrowest Symphony Orchestra (MA) since 1979,  Professor at Berklee College of Music and is a woodwind doubler at the North Shore Music Theater in Beverly (MA) and Colonial and Wang Theaters in Boston (MA) and PPAC in Providence (RI).

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

close
Public Program John & Abigail: A Life in Letters 24 January 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   registration required Co-Sponsored by the Abigail Adams Historical Society

Immerse yourself in the lives of John & Abigail Adams! This hands-on workshop will (re)introduce participants to the famous couple and their rich correspondence. What can these letters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Over the course of two Saturdays in January we will explore topics such education, women’s rights, and the challenges John and Abigail faced as a young family living through a revolution. Participants will have the opportunity to view treasures from the Society’s collections and tour the Abigail Adams Birthplace in Weymouth. This program is open to all K-12 educators, as well as history enthusiasts. Teachers can earn 10 PDPs.

Fee: $50 per person

For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

To register: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

Saturday, January 24 at the Massachusetts Historical Society

  • Analyze documents from the 1770s and 1780s. What, according to Abigail, was “the decisive day… on which the fate of America depends”? Did John “Remember the Ladies”?
  • View original Adams manuscripts from the Society's collections.
  • Try your hand at transcribing eighteenth-century Adams letters and diaries.

Saturday, January 31 at the Abigail Adams Birthplace

  • Tour the Abigail Adams Birthplace
  • Discover and discuss the historical, cultural, and ethical role of women in early America.
  • Explore the relationships forged between Thomas Jefferson and different members of the Adams family.

Watercolor, circa 1800; birthplace of Abigail (Smith) Adams

close
Public Program The Adams Series - Program One: The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams 29 January 2015.Thursday, all day Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Phyllis Lee Levin, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams A patriot by birth, John Quincy Adams’s destiny was foreordained. He was not only “The Greatest Traveler of His Age,” but a gifted linguist and diplomat. His world encompassed the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the early and late Napoleonic Age. As an adolescent, he met everyone who was anyone in Europe, including America’s own luminaries, Franklin and Jefferson. Coming back to America he was determined to make his own career, but was soon embarked, at Washington’s appointment, on work aboard. At 50, he returned to America to serve as Secretary of State to President Monroe. He was inaugurated President in 1824, after which he served as a stirring defender of the slaves of the Amistad rebellion and as a member of the House of Representatives from 1831 until his death in 1848. In The Remarkable Education of John Quincy Adams, Phyllis Lee Levin provides the deeply researched and beautifully written definitive story of the intellectual development of one of the most fascinating and towering early Americans.

Phyllis Lee Levin is the author of several books including Abigail Adams and Edith and Woodrow. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, she has been a reporter, editor, and columnist for The New York Times. As writer and editor at Vogue she wrote a profile of Patricia Nixon whom she interviewed at the White House. She lives in Manhattan. 

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

close
Public Program The Adams Series - Program Two: Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic 5 February 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Charles Edel, Assistant Professor - U.S. Naval War College $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

America “goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy”—John Quincy Adams’s famous words are often quoted to justify noninterference in other nations’ affairs. Yet when he spoke them, Adams was not advocating neutrality or passivity but rather outlining a national policy that balanced democratic idealism with a pragmatic understanding of the young republic’s capabilities and limitations. America’s rise from a confederation of revolutionary colonies to a world power is often treated as inevitable, but Charles N. Edel’s provocative biography of Adams argues that he served as the central architect of a grand strategy that shaped America’s rise. Adams’s particular combination of ideas and policies made him a critical link between the founding generation and the Civil War–era nation of Lincoln. While Adams did not live to see all of his strategy fulfilled, his vision shaped the nation’s agenda for decades afterward and continues to resonate as America pursues its place in the twenty-first-century world.

Charles EdelCharles Edel serves an Assistant Professor of Strategy and Policy at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, R.I., where he focuses on U.S. foreign policy and grand strategy, American political history, and the connections between foreign policy and domestic politics.  He holds a Ph.D. in History from Yale University, and received a B.A. in Classical Civilization from Yale College. He worked at Peking University's Center for International and Strategic Studies as a Henry A. Luce Scholar. Previously, he served in various roles in the U.S. government as a political and counterterrorism analyst, worked as a research associate at the Council of Foreign Relations, and taught high school history in New York.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

close
Public Program Arts and Crafts Architecture: History and Heritage in New England 11 February 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Maureen Meister, independent art historian $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

Maureen Meister’s new book is the first comprehensive study of the Arts and Crafts architecture in the region. Focusing on the 1890s through the 1920s, she will explain how a group of Boston architects and craftsmen encountered English Arts and Crafts theorists, including John Ruskin and William Morris, and produced exquisite works of their own. Among the architects were Ralph Adams Cram, Lois Lilley Howe, Charles Maginnis, and R. Clipston Sturgis. They were conservative in some respects, promoting designs based on historical precedent and the region's heritage, while they also were forward-looking, blending Arts and Crafts values with Progressive Era idealism. They have left us with a legacy of landmark buildings, honored today in cities and towns across New England.

Maureen Meister is an art historian who writes about American art and architecture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She is the author of Architecture and the Arts and Crafts Movement in Boston: Harvard's H. Langford Warren, 2003, and was volume editor of H. H. Richardson: The Architect, His Peers, and Their Era, 1999. She holds a doctorate from Brown University and an A.B. from Mount Holyoke College. She has taught at Boston area universities, including Lesley, Northeastern, and Tufts.  

close
Public Program The Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity 17 February 2015.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Thomas de Waal, Senior Associate - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915-16 was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the 20th century. By various estimates, more than a million Armenians were killed and the survivors were scattered across the world. In Great Catastrophe, the eminent scholar and reporter Thomas de Waal looks at the changing narratives and politics of the Armenian Genocide and tells the story of recent efforts by courageous Armenians, Kurds, and Turks to come to terms with the disaster as Turkey enters a new post-Kemalist era. Drawing on archival sources, reportage and moving personal stories, de Waal tells the full story of Armenian-Turkish relations since the Genocide in all its extraordinary twists and turns. He strips away the propaganda to look both at the realities of a terrible crime and also the divisive "politics of genocide" it produced. The book throws light not only on our understanding of Armenian-Turkish relations but also of how mass atrocities and historical tragedies shape contemporary politics.

Thomas de Waal is a writer and scholar on the Caucasus and Black Sea region and currently Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is the author of three books, including The Caucasus: An Introduction. From 1991 to 2000, de Waal worked as a newspaper journalist in Moscow and for the BBC World Service in London.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

close
Public Program Comic Books in the History Classroom 18 February 2015.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   registration required

Learn how to capture your students’ attention and engage their imagination using comic books and graphic novels! Together with a historian we will explore the history of colonial Massachusetts, and hear from artists who have brought this period to life through images. We will also meet with teachers who have used comics in the classroom and brainstorm methods for incorporating them into history and English/language arts lessons. This program is open to all K-12 educators, as well as history enthusiasts. Teachers can earn 5 PDPs.

Fee: $25 per person

For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

To register: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

  • Meet artists who have created and contributed to comic books on the history of colonial America.
  • View original political cartoons and other documents from the Society’s collections.
  • Learn how to incorporate comic books from multiple historical eras into your lesson plans.
close
Public Program The Adams Series - Program Three: The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams: A Cookbook 19 February 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 pm program with 5:30 reception Rosana Y. Wan, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

On November 29, 1798, Abigail Adams wrote “When I look Back upon the Year past, I perceive many, very many causes for thanksgiving, both of a publick and private nature.” Throughout their dialog, John reported on having formal dinners in Europe or delegates in Philadelphia while Abigail grew from a New England wife to the The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail AdamsFirst Lady. By studying "receipts" from 18th century cookbooks, we can paint a portrait of their culinary lives. While together, Abigail once wrote to her sister that her “Good Man is so very fat that [she is] lean as a rale,” before ending the letter “But is dinner time, and I must bid you good by…” While they were separate, they reminded each other of dishes they enjoyed including “rusticrat potatoes” and “fine salmon” while continuing the talk of independence. Rosana Y. Wan will speak about the process of documenting the culinary history of the Adams family and putting together her cookbook.

Rosana Yin-Ting Wan was born in Hong Kong and migrated to the United States as a child. Growing up in Houston, Texas, she began her passion of history by giving short lectures on classical music composers to fellow music class students. She received her B.A. in history from Suffolk University in 2011. As an independent scholar, a museum docent, and a sergeant in the Army National Guard, she continues to pursue her studies in the history of the American Revolution, late 18th century culinary culture, and fine arts. She is the first recipient of the John C. Cavanagh Prize in History at Suffolk University in 2011 and a member of the Phi Alpha Theta (National History Honor Society). She is also a recipient of the 2014 Outstanding New Interpreter Award from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Please call 617-646-0578 to register

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