Membership

The Massachusetts Historical Society has two membership categories—Fellows and Members. Both groups are important to the life of the Society. Fellows and Members help support the Society's mission and receive benefits such as a subscription to our annual journal, the Massachusetts Historical Review, and invitations to special events.

Members

Membership at the MHS is open to all with an interest in American history. The Society welcomes Members from near and far to join its community of history lovers. The MHS offers a handful of different membership categories aimed to encourage participation in its various activities. Learn how to become a Member or renew your membership now.

Fellows

Election as a Fellow of the MHS is an honor bestowed by the Society on distinguished scholars and civic leaders. The Fellows are the legal governing body of the MHS, and therefore have the privilege of shaping the Society. Learn more about the MHS Fellows or renew your Fellow dues.



Join Us at an Upcoming Program

Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014.Friday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

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Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 27 September 2014.Saturday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
October
Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic ...

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist The archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in ...

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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Thomas Hutchinson Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

details
Public Program 1914-1918: The War Within the War 9 October 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a ...

As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle within most of those countries: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild describes this battle in an illustrated talk, focusing on the country where that tension was sharpest, Great Britain.

Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild’s writing has focused on human rights and social justice. His seven books include King Leopold's Ghost: a Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, which won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England. Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. For the body of his work, he has received awards from the Lannan Foundation, the American Historical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

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Special Event, Public Program Opening Our Doors Open House 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural ...

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

details
Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan On October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked ...

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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Public Program Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Barbara Berenson Boston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending ...

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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Public Program, Special Event Honoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013) 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of ...

Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of the MHS were both of tremendous value to this community. A distinguished historian who authored significant works on the Revolutionary era, Maier shaped—and will continue to shape—the way generations of students and readers view the foundation of American democracy. Join us as Professor Gordon S. Wood pays tribute to a great historian, teacher, and author who was committed to making American history vivid and accessible to all.

Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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November
Public Program The Rising at Roxbury Crossing: Boston 1919 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm James Redfearn In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles ...

In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles with his conscience after being caught up in the violence of his native land’s rebellion. The Rising at Roxbury Crossing features a hard and gritty look at post-World War I Boston when she was burdened with high unemployment, radical anarchists, and labor unrest. Escaped political prisoner, Eamon de Valera campaigns for financial assistance for Ireland’s revolutionary government as the city’s police prepare to strike for fair pay and better working conditions. It is 1919, and just as Boston’s Irish patrolman strike and the city erupts into riots and chaos, Willie’s nemesis crosses the Atlantic to track him down. Willie Dwyer must decide whether to run from his past or confront his future.

Jim Redfearn was raised in Boston’s Mission Hill neighborhood and is a former Massachusetts State Trooper, an investigator for a prominent Boston law firm, and an industrial photographer. He earned a graduate degree in writing from Harvard University at the age of fifty-nine. His short fiction has been published by the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writer’s Network. Among his many appearances, Jim has participated in several authors’ panels, including last year’s panel at Harvard University, moderated by Pulitzer Prize winner, Paul Harding. He has lectured in the Moses Greeley Parker Lecture Series, at the Irish Cultural Center of New England and the Union Club of Boston. Visit www.TheRisingAtRoxburyCrossing.com to learn more about Jim or his novel.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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Cocktails with Clio 2014 Special Event Cocktails with Clio 7 November 2014.Friday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of ...

The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of history, this festive evening celebrates American history and the 223-year-old mission of the Society. Following an elegant cocktail buffet at the Society’s building, guests will proceed to the nearby Harvard Club for dessert and a conversation with historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Hackett FIscher.

Tickets cost $250 per person. All net proceeds from the event will support the Society's outreach efforts.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s outreach efforts have expanded. The additional funding has an important impact on our programming, and this year we hope to surpass last year’s goal in order to further enhance our exhibitions, public programs, and education initiatives. 

We are proud to offer individual sponsorship opportunities at the following levels:
$5,000 - Clio’s Circle
$2,500 - Patrons of the Muse
$1,000 - Friends of the Muse   

For more information about becoming a sponsor, please contact Carol Knauff at cknauff@masshist.org or 617-646-0554.

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Public Program Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England 14 November 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Corin Hirsch Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage ...

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns—watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Corin Hirsch is an award-winning food and drinks writer at Seven Days, the alt-weekly in Burlington, Vermont. She learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

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Public Program Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island's Founding Father 17 November 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Linford D. Fisher, Brown University and J. Stanley Lemons, Rhode Island College In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a ...

In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a mysterious handwritten code, long suspected to be the work of Roger Williams, the seventeenth century theologian and founder of Rhode Island. In the spring of 2012, an interdisciplinary team of undergraduates, with support from faculty members, was able to crack this code, revealing a brand new essay by Roger Williams. Come peer into the mind of Roger Williams through the presentations by Linford D. Fisher (Brown University) and J. Stanley Lemons (Rhode Island College), who will discuss what this new essay tells us about Williams. Copies of their new book, Decoding Roger Williams (2014), co-authored with Lucas Mason-Brown, will also be available for purchase.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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More events
Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 registration required This event will take place at the Framingham History Center.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

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Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required at no cost THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. Thomas Hutchinson

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

close
Public Program 1914-1918: The War Within the War 9 October 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley

As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle within most of those countries: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild describes this battle in an illustrated talk, focusing on the country where that tension was sharpest, Great Britain.

Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild’s writing has focused on human rights and social justice. His seven books include King Leopold's Ghost: a Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, which won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England. Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. For the body of his work, he has received awards from the Lannan Foundation, the American Historical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

close
Special Event, Public Program Opening Our Doors Open House 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM this event is free

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

close
Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Public Program Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Barbara Berenson

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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Public Program, Special Event Honoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013) 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University

Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of the MHS were both of tremendous value to this community. A distinguished historian who authored significant works on the Revolutionary era, Maier shaped—and will continue to shape—the way generations of students and readers view the foundation of American democracy. Join us as Professor Gordon S. Wood pays tribute to a great historian, teacher, and author who was committed to making American history vivid and accessible to all.

Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Public Program The Rising at Roxbury Crossing: Boston 1919 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm James Redfearn

In this fascinating fictional tale Willie Dwyer, an Irish immigrant and Boston patrolman, struggles with his conscience after being caught up in the violence of his native land’s rebellion. The Rising at Roxbury Crossing features a hard and gritty look at post-World War I Boston when she was burdened with high unemployment, radical anarchists, and labor unrest. Escaped political prisoner, Eamon de Valera campaigns for financial assistance for Ireland’s revolutionary government as the city’s police prepare to strike for fair pay and better working conditions. It is 1919, and just as Boston’s Irish patrolman strike and the city erupts into riots and chaos, Willie’s nemesis crosses the Atlantic to track him down. Willie Dwyer must decide whether to run from his past or confront his future.

Jim Redfearn was raised in Boston’s Mission Hill neighborhood and is a former Massachusetts State Trooper, an investigator for a prominent Boston law firm, and an industrial photographer. He earned a graduate degree in writing from Harvard University at the age of fifty-nine. His short fiction has been published by the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writer’s Network. Among his many appearances, Jim has participated in several authors’ panels, including last year’s panel at Harvard University, moderated by Pulitzer Prize winner, Paul Harding. He has lectured in the Moses Greeley Parker Lecture Series, at the Irish Cultural Center of New England and the Union Club of Boston. Visit www.TheRisingAtRoxburyCrossing.com to learn more about Jim or his novel.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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Special Event Cocktails with Clio 7 November 2014.Friday, 6:00PM - 9:00PM registration required Cocktails with Clio 2014

The fifth annual Cocktails with Clio will take place on 7 November 2014. Named for the muse of history, this festive evening celebrates American history and the 223-year-old mission of the Society. Following an elegant cocktail buffet at the Society’s building, guests will proceed to the nearby Harvard Club for dessert and a conversation with historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Hackett FIscher.

Tickets cost $250 per person. All net proceeds from the event will support the Society's outreach efforts.


Become a sponsor of Cocktails with Clio

Our sponsors are crucial to the success of the event. As a result of their generosity, the Society’s outreach efforts have expanded. The additional funding has an important impact on our programming, and this year we hope to surpass last year’s goal in order to further enhance our exhibitions, public programs, and education initiatives. 

We are proud to offer individual sponsorship opportunities at the following levels:
$5,000 - Clio’s Circle
$2,500 - Patrons of the Muse
$1,000 - Friends of the Muse   

For more information about becoming a sponsor, please contact Carol Knauff at cknauff@masshist.org or 617-646-0554.

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Public Program Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England 14 November 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Corin Hirsch

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns—watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Corin Hirsch is an award-winning food and drinks writer at Seven Days, the alt-weekly in Burlington, Vermont. She learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

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Public Program Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island's Founding Father 17 November 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Linford D. Fisher, Brown University and J. Stanley Lemons, Rhode Island College

In the margins of a curious seventeenth century book at the John Carter Brown Library is a mysterious handwritten code, long suspected to be the work of Roger Williams, the seventeenth century theologian and founder of Rhode Island. In the spring of 2012, an interdisciplinary team of undergraduates, with support from faculty members, was able to crack this code, revealing a brand new essay by Roger Williams. Come peer into the mind of Roger Williams through the presentations by Linford D. Fisher (Brown University) and J. Stanley Lemons (Rhode Island College), who will discuss what this new essay tells us about Williams. Copies of their new book, Decoding Roger Williams (2014), co-authored with Lucas Mason-Brown, will also be available for purchase.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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