Membership

The Massachusetts Historical Society has two membership categories—Fellows and Members. Both groups are important to the life of the Society. Fellows and Members help support the Society's mission and receive benefits such as a subscription to our annual journal, the Massachusetts Historical Review, and invitations to special events.

Members

Membership at the MHS is open to all with an interest in American history. The Society welcomes Members from near and far to join its community of history lovers. The MHS offers a handful of different membership categories aimed to encourage participation in its various activities. Learn how to become a Member or renew your membership now.

Fellows

Election as a Fellow of the MHS is an honor bestowed by the Society on distinguished scholars and civic leaders. The Fellows are the legal governing body of the MHS, and therefore have the privilege of shaping the Society. Learn more about the MHS Fellows or renew your Fellow dues.



Join Us at an Upcoming Program

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Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2014.Wednesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

details
Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 14 August 2014.Thursday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

details
September
Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014.Friday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 27 September 2014.Saturday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
October
Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic ...

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 to register.

details
Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist The archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in ...

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

details
More events
Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2014 to 14 August 2014 registration required This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

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Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 registration required This event will take place at the Framingham History Center.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

close
Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 to register.

close
Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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