January 2020
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Animal City: The Domestication of America 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on ...

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Genetown: The Urbanization of the Boston Area Biotechnology Industry 28 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Robin Wolfe Scheffler, MIT Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet ...

Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet in the 1980s, the rapid concentration of the industry within Boston’s urban neighborhoods was a striking contrast to the suburbanization of high technology research and development a generation before. This remarkable urbanization represented the confluence of the labor and financial challenges faced by biotechnology start-ups with decisions regarding municipal governance and redevelopment in the aftermath of deindustrialization.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg Public Program, Conversation Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them ...

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

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February 2020
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 1 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars 2019-2020/Gomes.jpg Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 3 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College Rae Gould, Brown University Please join us for a special evening in which historian Christine DeLucia will receive the 2019 ...

Please join us for a special evening in which historian Christine DeLucia will receive the 2019 Gomes Prize for Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast. DeLucia will join Dr. Rae Gould in a conversation about the war’s effects on the everyday lives and collective mentalities of the region’s diverse Native and Euro-American communities over the course of several centuries, focusing on persistent struggles over land and water, sovereignty, resistance, cultural memory, and intercultural interactions

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/Talya_image.jpg Digital History Seminar Historical Datasets as Arguments: 21st Century Curations of 17th Century Records 4 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Talya Housman, Digital Historian Using Dr. Housman’s experience of curating a relational database on cases of sexual crime and ...

Using Dr. Housman’s experience of curating a relational database on cases of sexual crime and gendered violence in England between 1642 and 1660 as a point of entry, this talk looks at some implicit editorial arguments we make in our historical research. This talk will outline the process of data collection, designing, and building the database (including software selection and database design choices) and discuss some of the issues posed by historical data itself, including standardization of spelling and how to document uncertainty.

Content warning: this talk discusses sexual violence

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of ...

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 8 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s ...

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar Northern Exposure: American Military Engineering in the Arctic Circle 11 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gretchen Heefner, Northeastern University Comment: Christopher Capozzola, MIT From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, ...

From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, though largely unknown, infrastructure of military facilities throughout the Far North. This paper examines how these engineers explored the Arctic regions, what sorts of information they accumulated about it, and ultimately what happened to that information once it was released from military constraints.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 15 February 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Building Closed Presidents' Day 17 February 2020.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar “What the Women Can Do:” Doctors’ Wives and the American Medical Association’s Crusade Against Socialized Medicine 18 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kelly O’Donnell, Thomas Jefferson University Comment: Oliva Weisser, University of Massachusetts, Boston In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national ...

In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national health program in this country, through lobbying and public outreach about the dangers of socialized medicine. Their most powerful weapon in this fight was a less conventional medical instrument: their wives. This paper examines the mobilization of the AMA Woman’s Auxiliary as the main “public relations firm” of organized medicine during these debates and their lingering influence on American health politics.

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Public Program, Author Talk Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and ...

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 20 February 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College 1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the ...

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program, MHS Tour FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, ...

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 22 February 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Difference the Nineteenth Amendment Made: Southern Black Women and the Reconstruction of American Politics 25 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Liette Gidlow, Wayne State University Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed ...

Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed after women got the vote: the suffrage coalition splintered, women’s voter turnout was low, and the progressive reforms promised by suffragists failed to materialize. This interpretation, however, does not fully account for the activities of aspiring African American women voters in the Jim Crow South at the time or more broadly across the U.S. in the decades since. This paper argues that southern Black women’s efforts to vote, successful and otherwise, transformed not only the mid-century Black freedom struggle but political parties, election procedures, and social movements on the right and the left.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg Public Program, Author Talk We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have ...

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

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Teacher Workshop Lessons from the Boston Massacre: Media Literacy in the 18th Century & Today 29 February 2020.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration Fee: $25 In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events ...

In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events leading up to it and the conflict's aftermath, which played out both in the courts and in public opinion. Using a variety of primary sources, we will examine the public narratives about the Massacre that were created and disseminated and connect our discussion to 21st-century sites of protest and challenges to authority, both violent and non-violent.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

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MHS Tour Canceled: The History and Collections of the MHS 29 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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March 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg Public Program, Author Talk John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial 2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Dan Abrams and David Fisher There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in ...

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The 1621 Massasoit-Plymouth Agreement and the Genesis of American Indian Constitutionalism 3 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Linford Fisher: Brown University On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense ...

On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense with Plymouth. At the same time, Massasoit promised to send his people who injured Englishmen to stand trial in their courts. While apparently contradictory, Plymouth’s acknowledgment of Wampanoag sovereignty and claim of the right to judge such conflicts reflected emerging international law and English legal norms, and created a constitution for Native-English relations that held for decades. Although King Philip’s War destroyed this agreement, similar political and jurisdictional arrangements continued to dominate British America and were reflected in U.S. Indian policy through the 1820s.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg Public Program, Author Talk The Boston Massacre: A Family History 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most ...

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 7 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/wgbh_brightspotcdn.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Inventing Boston: Design, Production, & Consumption, 1680–1720 9 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Edward S. Cooke, Jr., Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most ...

During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most important port in the British empire. Boston was also an independent entity that articulated its own identity while appropriating British culture and fashion. Edward Cooke examines period dwellings, gravestones, furniture, textiles, ceramics, and silver, revealing through material culture how the inhabitants of Boston were colonial, provincial, metropolitan, and global, all at the same time. This detailed account demonstrates how Bostonians constructed a distinct sense of local identity, a process of hybridization that exhibited a desire to shape a culture as a means to resist a distant power.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The Metabolism of Military Forces in the War of Independence: Environmental Contexts and Consequences 10 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM David Hsiung, Juniata College Comment: James Rice, Tufts University In order to function during the War of Independence, armies and navies needed multiple sources of ...

In order to function during the War of Independence, armies and navies needed multiple sources of energy—food, firewood, work animals (which also needed food), ammunition, and more. How did specific natural environments, both proximate and distant, fuel those military metabolisms? How did such actions affect those environments in the decades and centuries that followed? This paper is the seed of a book proposal that, when watered by your feedback, will germinate come summertime.

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Author Talk, Public Program City on a Hill: A History of American Exceptionalism 11 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Abram C. Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by ...

Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by Massachusetts Bay governor John Winthrop, shaped the story of American exceptionalism in the 20th Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/city_on_a_hill_book_cover.jpgcentury. By tracing the strange history of Winthrop’s speech, from total obscurity in its own day to pervasive use in modern politics, Van Engen reveals the way national stories take shape and shows us how those tales continue to influence competing visions of the country—the many different meanings of America that emerge from a preservation of its literary past.

 

 

 

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Biography Seminar Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography 12 March 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Is fashion art or industry? Is it evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of ...

Is fashion art or industry? Is it evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, biographer of Clover Adams and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 14 March 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion 17 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Micki McElya, University of Connecticut The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of ...

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South 19 March 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Tyler D. Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of ...

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 21 March 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg Public Program, Conversation Jefferson: Then & Now 24 March 2020.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard Law School There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history ...

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

 

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 28 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Pacific Railroads and the Pacific Ocean: American Expansion, Asian Trade, and Terraqueous Mobility, 1869–1914 31 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sean Fraga, Princeton University Comment: David Armitage, Harvard University The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and ...

The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and environment. But as this talk argues, late-nineteenth-century Americans also saw these railroads in global terms, as commercial infrastructure that could link the United States with Asia and the Pacific World. This paper recovers the excitement many nineteenth-century white Americans felt about trade with Asia and shows how interest in Asian trade was woven into the transcontinental railroads from their very beginnings.

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April 2020
Public Program, Author Talk The Hunt for History: On the Trail of the World’s Lost Treasures—from the Letters of Lincoln, Churchill, & Einstein to the Secret Recordings Onboard JFK’s Air Force One 1 April 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Nathan Raab There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Nathan Raab, America’s preeminent rare documents dealer, describes his years as the Sherlock ...

Nathan Raab, America’s preeminent rare documents dealer, describes his years as the Sherlock Holmes of historical artifacts and he shows us what the past Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/the-hunt-for-history-9781501198908_lg_1_.jpgcan tell us about the present. Raab shares some fascinating stories: spotting a letter from British officials that secured the Rosetta Stone; discovering a piece of the first electric cable laid by Edison; restoring a fragmented letter from Andrew Jackson that led to the infamous Trail of Tears; and locating copies of missing audio that had been recorded on Air Force One as the plane brought JFK’s body back to Washington. Every document and artifact uncovers a story—and offers new insights into a life we thought we knew.

 

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 April 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/When_it_was_grand-_cropped.jpg Public Program, Author Talk When It Was Grand: The Radical Republican History of the Civil War 6 April 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. LeeAnna Keith There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). In 1862, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison summarized the Civil War: “There is a war because ...

In 1862, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison summarized the Civil War: “There is a war because there was a Republican Party. There was a Republican Party because there was an Abolition Party. There was an Abolition Party because there was Slavery.” Garrison’s statement expresses the essential truths at the heart of LeeAnna Keith’s narrative, which introduces us to the idealistic Massachusetts preachers and philanthropists, rugged Midwestern politicians, and African American activists who collaborated to protect escaped slaves from their captors, create and defend black military regiments, and win the contest for the soul of their party. In the 1850s and 1860s, the Republican Party stood for a demanding ideal of racial justice—and insisted that the nation live up to it.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 7 April 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have ...

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery. By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy. Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.” This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar “Contrary to the Rules and Maxims of the Law and Nation”: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries 9 April 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Zachary Bennett, Connecticut College Comment: Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut Long before industrialization, New Englanders dammed their rivers. The dams that powered saw and ...

Long before industrialization, New Englanders dammed their rivers. The dams that powered saw and grist mills saved farmers days of backbreaking labor, but they also blocked fish migrations which generations of colonists and Indians depended on for food. Although laws protected people’s right to fish, New England colonies refused to enforce them. This inaction destroyed herring and salmon runs, triggering a cascade of ecological changes that ultimately dragged the region into the market economy.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 11 April 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_image.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Kooks & Degenerates on Ice: Bobby Orr, the Big Bad Bruins, & the Stanley Cup Championship That Transformed Hockey 16 April 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Whalen There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). During the 1969–1970 season, the “Big, Bad Bruins,” led by the legendary Bobby Orr ...

During the 1969–1970 season, the “Big, Bad Bruins,” led by the legendary Bobby Orr, brushed off their perennial losing ways to defeat the St. Louis Blues in the Stanley Cup Finals for their first championship in 29 years. Thomas J. Whalen brings to life all the colorful personalities and iconic players from this Stanley Cup-raising team. Whalen situates this winning season into its historical context as the United States struggled with issues of war, race, politics, and class, making his book a must-read for sports enthusiasts, hockey fans, and those interested in twentieth-century American history.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program, MHS Tour John Adams & the Boston Massacre Trials 17 April 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, ...

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 April 2020.Saturday, all day The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Building Closed Patriots' Day 20 April 2020.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Patriots' Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Patriots' Day.

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Teacher Workshop Legislating the Environment: Teaching Environmental History and Civics 21 April 2020.Tuesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration Fee: $25 In partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, we will explore the intersections of ...

In partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, we will explore the intersections of environmental history, science, and engineering. Chad Montrie, Professor at UMass Lowell, will provide an overview to the study of environmental history, particularly as it relates to New England industry. Teachers will examine primary sources and participate in hands-on activities with Tsongas Center staff drawn from their "Industrial Watershed and "River as Classroom" programs.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Boston Feminists on Drugs, 1970-1990 21 April 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Comment: Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University With the current opioid crisis as a backdrop, this paper examines the role various groups of Boston ...

With the current opioid crisis as a backdrop, this paper examines the role various groups of Boston feminists played in the development of women’s substance abuse treatment in the 1980s and ‘90s. Organizations such as Women, Inc. (Roxbury), The Dorchester Green Lite Network, and the Cambridge and Somerville Program for Addiction Recovery had roots in and connections to well-known feminist collectives across the city. These historical connections between radical women’s organizing and the development of “behavioral health” services for women sheds light not only on the evolution of late-20th century public policy and medicine, but also of popular feminist culture.

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Public Program, Conversation Bringing Back the Pilgrims: Living History at Plimoth Plantation 22 April 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Catherine Allgor, MHS; Richard Pickering, Plimoth Plantation; Malka Benjamin, Plimoth Plantation; and moderator William Martin There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). How do historians create authentic public history? How do they tell their story to a wide and ...

How do historians create authentic public history? How do they tell their story to a wide and diverse audience? Living history makes the past accessible, but like all popular history, it must balance accessibility with an accurate depiction of the human past. Theatrical techniques like dialogue, costuming, setting, and character development can bring a historical moment to life, but the story that’s told must be rooted in serious scholarship and careful research. How do ‘Living Historians’ meet this challenge? Join us for a lively panel discussion among historians who have grappled with these questions.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation 23 April 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and ...

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Public Program, Author Talk Animal City: The Domestication of America Register registration required 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Genetown: The Urbanization of the Boston Area Biotechnology Industry Register registration required at no cost 28 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Robin Wolfe Scheffler, MIT Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet in the 1980s, the rapid concentration of the industry within Boston’s urban neighborhoods was a striking contrast to the suburbanization of high technology research and development a generation before. This remarkable urbanization represented the confluence of the labor and financial challenges faced by biotechnology start-ups with decisions regarding municipal governance and redevelopment in the aftermath of deindustrialization.

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Public Program, Conversation Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 1 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony Register registration required at no cost 3 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College Rae Gould, Brown University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars 2019-2020/Gomes.jpg

Please join us for a special evening in which historian Christine DeLucia will receive the 2019 Gomes Prize for Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast. DeLucia will join Dr. Rae Gould in a conversation about the war’s effects on the everyday lives and collective mentalities of the region’s diverse Native and Euro-American communities over the course of several centuries, focusing on persistent struggles over land and water, sovereignty, resistance, cultural memory, and intercultural interactions

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Digital History Seminar Historical Datasets as Arguments: 21st Century Curations of 17th Century Records Register registration required at no cost 4 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Talya Housman, Digital Historian Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/Talya_image.jpg

Using Dr. Housman’s experience of curating a relational database on cases of sexual crime and gendered violence in England between 1642 and 1660 as a point of entry, this talk looks at some implicit editorial arguments we make in our historical research. This talk will outline the process of data collection, designing, and building the database (including software selection and database design choices) and discuss some of the issues posed by historical data itself, including standardization of spelling and how to document uncertainty.

Content warning: this talk discusses sexual violence

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Public Program, Author Talk Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home Register registration required 5 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Richard Bell, University of Maryland There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/stolen_wide-dd6a29b2f762b304e6ede4494d2c7cd6f7ada634.jpg

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 8 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America Register registration required 10 February 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_Brown_Civil_PB_9781469653747_FC.jpg

This new assessment of Civil War monuments unveiled in the United States between the 1860s and 1930s argues that they were pivotal to a national embrace of military values. Americans' wariness of standing armies limited construction of war memorials in the early republic and continued to influence commemoration after the Civil War. Professor Brown provides the most comprehensive overview of the American war memorial as a cultural form and reframes the national debate over Civil War monuments that remain potent presences on the civic landscape.

 

 

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Environmental History Seminar Northern Exposure: American Military Engineering in the Arctic Circle Register registration required at no cost 11 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gretchen Heefner, Northeastern University Comment: Christopher Capozzola, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

From the late 1940s through the 1960s, U.S. military engineers constructed and maintained a vast, though largely unknown, infrastructure of military facilities throughout the Far North. This paper examines how these engineers explored the Arctic regions, what sorts of information they accumulated about it, and ultimately what happened to that information once it was released from military constraints.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 15 February 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Building Closed Presidents' Day 17 February 2020.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents' Day.

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar “What the Women Can Do:” Doctors’ Wives and the American Medical Association’s Crusade Against Socialized Medicine Register registration required at no cost 18 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kelly O’Donnell, Thomas Jefferson University Comment: Oliva Weisser, University of Massachusetts, Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

In the mid-twentieth century, the American Medical Association opposed attempts to create a national health program in this country, through lobbying and public outreach about the dangers of socialized medicine. Their most powerful weapon in this fight was a less conventional medical instrument: their wives. This paper examines the mobilization of the AMA Woman’s Auxiliary as the main “public relations firm” of organized medicine during these debates and their lingering influence on American health politics.

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Public Program, Author Talk Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History Register registration required 19 February 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30.There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Sarah Knott, Indiana University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Pregnancy, birth and the encounter with an infant: how have these experiences changed over time and cultures? Blending memoir and history, feminist Sarah Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/31yevAbe45L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgKnott draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, pores over archives, and documents her own experiences to craft a new historical interpretation of maternity for our changing times.

 

 

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African American History Seminar Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks Register registration required at no cost 20 February 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

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Public Program, MHS Tour FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk this event is free 21 February 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 22 February 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Difference the Nineteenth Amendment Made: Southern Black Women and the Reconstruction of American Politics Register registration required at no cost 25 February 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Liette Gidlow, Wayne State University Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

Many scholars have argued that though the enfranchisement of women was laudable, not much changed after women got the vote: the suffrage coalition splintered, women’s voter turnout was low, and the progressive reforms promised by suffragists failed to materialize. This interpretation, however, does not fully account for the activities of aspiring African American women voters in the Jim Crow South at the time or more broadly across the U.S. in the decades since. This paper argues that southern Black women’s efforts to vote, successful and otherwise, transformed not only the mid-century Black freedom struggle but political parties, election procedures, and social movements on the right and the left.

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Public Program, Author Talk We the People: The 500-Year Battle Over Who Is American Register registration required 27 February 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Benjamin Railton, Fitchburg State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/We_the_People_high-res_cover-cropped.jpg

Ben Railton argues that throughout our history two competing yet interconnected concepts have battled to define our national identity and community: Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_We_the_People_high-res_cover.jpgexclusionary and inclusive visions of who gets to be an American. From the earliest moments of European contact with indigenous peoples, through the Revolutionary period's debates on African American slavery, 19th century conflicts over Indian Removal, Mexican landowners, and Chinese immigrants, 20th century controversies around Filipino Americans and Japanese internment, and 21st century fears of Muslim Americans, time and again this defining battle has shaped our society and culture.

 

 

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Teacher Workshop Lessons from the Boston Massacre: Media Literacy in the 18th Century & Today Please RSVP   registration required 29 February 2020.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration Fee: $25

In honor of the 250th anniversary of the infamous Boston Massacre, we will explore the events leading up to it and the conflict's aftermath, which played out both in the courts and in public opinion. Using a variety of primary sources, we will examine the public narratives about the Massacre that were created and disseminated and connect our discussion to 21st-century sites of protest and challenges to authority, both violent and non-violent.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

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MHS Tour Canceled:
The History and Collections of the MHS
this event is free 29 February 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial Register registration required 2 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Dan Abrams and David Fisher There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0054johnadams_blyth_lg.jpg

History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was a Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover.jpglawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law.

 

 

 

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The 1621 Massasoit-Plymouth Agreement and the Genesis of American Indian Constitutionalism Register registration required at no cost 3 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Linford Fisher: Brown University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

On March 22, 1621, Wampanoag sachem Massasoit agreed to a pact of mutual sovereignty and defense with Plymouth. At the same time, Massasoit promised to send his people who injured Englishmen to stand trial in their courts. While apparently contradictory, Plymouth’s acknowledgment of Wampanoag sovereignty and claim of the right to judge such conflicts reflected emerging international law and English legal norms, and created a constitution for Native-English relations that held for decades. Although King Philip’s War destroyed this agreement, similar political and jurisdictional arrangements continued to dominate British America and were reflected in U.S. Indian policy through the 1820s.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Boston Massacre: A Family History Register registration required 4 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Serena Zabin, Carleton College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/518bOnzPqnL.jpg

The story of the Boston Massacre is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, most accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/book_cover_2_.jpgfrom conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. She reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied the armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs, and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human and now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 7 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk Inventing Boston: Design, Production, & Consumption, 1680–1720 Register registration required 9 March 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Edward S. Cooke, Jr., Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/wgbh_brightspotcdn.jpg

During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Boston was both a colonial capital and the third most important port in the British empire. Boston was also an independent entity that articulated its own identity while appropriating British culture and fashion. Edward Cooke examines period dwellings, gravestones, furniture, textiles, ceramics, and silver, revealing through material culture how the inhabitants of Boston were colonial, provincial, metropolitan, and global, all at the same time. This detailed account demonstrates how Bostonians constructed a distinct sense of local identity, a process of hybridization that exhibited a desire to shape a culture as a means to resist a distant power.

 

 

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Environmental History Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar The Metabolism of Military Forces in the War of Independence: Environmental Contexts and Consequences Register registration required at no cost 10 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM David Hsiung, Juniata College Comment: James Rice, Tufts University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

In order to function during the War of Independence, armies and navies needed multiple sources of energy—food, firewood, work animals (which also needed food), ammunition, and more. How did specific natural environments, both proximate and distant, fuel those military metabolisms? How did such actions affect those environments in the decades and centuries that followed? This paper is the seed of a book proposal that, when watered by your feedback, will germinate come summertime.

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Author Talk, Public Program City on a Hill: A History of American Exceptionalism Register registration required 11 March 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Abram C. Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Abram Van Engen shows how the phrase “City on a hill,” from a 1630 sermon by Massachusetts Bay governor John Winthrop, shaped the story of American exceptionalism in the 20th Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/city_on_a_hill_book_cover.jpgcentury. By tracing the strange history of Winthrop’s speech, from total obscurity in its own day to pervasive use in modern politics, Van Engen reveals the way national stories take shape and shows us how those tales continue to influence competing visions of the country—the many different meanings of America that emerge from a preservation of its literary past.

 

 

 

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Biography Seminar Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography Register registration required at no cost 12 March 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College

Is fashion art or industry? Is it evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, biographer of Clover Adams and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 14 March 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 17 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Micki McElya, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

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African American History Seminar “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South Register registration required at no cost 19 March 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Tyler D. Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 21 March 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Public Program, Conversation Jefferson: Then & Now Register registration required 24 March 2020.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard Law School There is a $20 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

 

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 28 March 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Pacific Railroads and the Pacific Ocean: American Expansion, Asian Trade, and Terraqueous Mobility, 1869–1914 Register registration required at no cost 31 March 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sean Fraga, Princeton University Comment: David Armitage, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and environment. But as this talk argues, late-nineteenth-century Americans also saw these railroads in global terms, as commercial infrastructure that could link the United States with Asia and the Pacific World. This paper recovers the excitement many nineteenth-century white Americans felt about trade with Asia and shows how interest in Asian trade was woven into the transcontinental railroads from their very beginnings.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Hunt for History: On the Trail of the World’s Lost Treasures—from the Letters of Lincoln, Churchill, & Einstein to the Secret Recordings Onboard JFK’s Air Force One Register registration required 1 April 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Nathan Raab There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

Nathan Raab, America’s preeminent rare documents dealer, describes his years as the Sherlock Holmes of historical artifacts and he shows us what the past Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/the-hunt-for-history-9781501198908_lg_1_.jpgcan tell us about the present. Raab shares some fascinating stories: spotting a letter from British officials that secured the Rosetta Stone; discovering a piece of the first electric cable laid by Edison; restoring a fragmented letter from Andrew Jackson that led to the infamous Trail of Tears; and locating copies of missing audio that had been recorded on Air Force One as the plane brought JFK’s body back to Washington. Every document and artifact uncovers a story—and offers new insights into a life we thought we knew.

 

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 4 April 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk When It Was Grand: The Radical Republican History of the Civil War Register registration required 6 April 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. LeeAnna Keith There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/When_it_was_grand-_cropped.jpg

In 1862, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison summarized the Civil War: “There is a war because there was a Republican Party. There was a Republican Party because there was an Abolition Party. There was an Abolition Party because there was Slavery.” Garrison’s statement expresses the essential truths at the heart of LeeAnna Keith’s narrative, which introduces us to the idealistic Massachusetts preachers and philanthropists, rugged Midwestern politicians, and African American activists who collaborated to protect escaped slaves from their captors, create and defend black military regiments, and win the contest for the soul of their party. In the 1850s and 1860s, the Republican Party stood for a demanding ideal of racial justice—and insisted that the nation live up to it.

 

 

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 Register registration required at no cost 7 April 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery. By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy. Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.” This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.

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Environmental History Seminar “Contrary to the Rules and Maxims of the Law and Nation”: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries Register registration required at no cost 9 April 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Zachary Bennett, Connecticut College Comment: Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

Long before industrialization, New Englanders dammed their rivers. The dams that powered saw and grist mills saved farmers days of backbreaking labor, but they also blocked fish migrations which generations of colonists and Indians depended on for food. Although laws protected people’s right to fish, New England colonies refused to enforce them. This inaction destroyed herring and salmon runs, triggering a cascade of ecological changes that ultimately dragged the region into the market economy.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 11 April 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Public Program, Author Talk Kooks & Degenerates on Ice: Bobby Orr, the Big Bad Bruins, & the Stanley Cup Championship That Transformed Hockey Register registration required 16 April 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Thomas J. Whalen There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_image.jpg

During the 1969–1970 season, the “Big, Bad Bruins,” led by the legendary Bobby Orr, brushed off their perennial losing ways to defeat the St. Louis Blues in the Stanley Cup Finals for their first championship in 29 years. Thomas J. Whalen brings to life all the colorful personalities and iconic players from this Stanley Cup-raising team. Whalen situates this winning season into its historical context as the United States struggled with issues of war, race, politics, and class, making his book a must-read for sports enthusiasts, hockey fans, and those interested in twentieth-century American history.

 

 

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Public Program, MHS Tour John Adams & the Boston Massacre Trials this event is free 17 April 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Amanda Norton, the Adams Papers at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Amanda Norton of the Adams Papers will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and reinterprets the events of March 5, 1770 and the courtroom drama that unfolded after the massacre through the archival material found in the MHS collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS this event is free 18 April 2020.Saturday, all day

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Building Closed Patriots' Day 20 April 2020.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Patriots' Day.

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Teacher Workshop Legislating the Environment: Teaching Environmental History and Civics Please RSVP   registration required 21 April 2020.Tuesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Registration Fee: $25

In partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, we will explore the intersections of environmental history, science, and engineering. Chad Montrie, Professor at UMass Lowell, will provide an overview to the study of environmental history, particularly as it relates to New England industry. Teachers will examine primary sources and participate in hands-on activities with Tsongas Center staff drawn from their "Industrial Watershed and "River as Classroom" programs.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

 

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Boston Feminists on Drugs, 1970-1990 Register registration required at no cost 21 April 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Comment: Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

With the current opioid crisis as a backdrop, this paper examines the role various groups of Boston feminists played in the development of women’s substance abuse treatment in the 1980s and ‘90s. Organizations such as Women, Inc. (Roxbury), The Dorchester Green Lite Network, and the Cambridge and Somerville Program for Addiction Recovery had roots in and connections to well-known feminist collectives across the city. These historical connections between radical women’s organizing and the development of “behavioral health” services for women sheds light not only on the evolution of late-20th century public policy and medicine, but also of popular feminist culture.

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Public Program, Conversation Bringing Back the Pilgrims: Living History at Plimoth Plantation Register registration required 22 April 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Catherine Allgor, MHS; Richard Pickering, Plimoth Plantation; Malka Benjamin, Plimoth Plantation; and moderator William Martin There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders).

How do historians create authentic public history? How do they tell their story to a wide and diverse audience? Living history makes the past accessible, but like all popular history, it must balance accessibility with an accurate depiction of the human past. Theatrical techniques like dialogue, costuming, setting, and character development can bring a historical moment to life, but the story that’s told must be rooted in serious scholarship and careful research. How do ‘Living Historians’ meet this challenge? Join us for a lively panel discussion among historians who have grappled with these questions.

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African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation Register registration required at no cost 23 April 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

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