March 2012
Member Event The Architecture of Edmund March Wheelwright and the Building of the Harvard Lampoon Castle 1 March 2012.Thursday, 5:30PM - 8:30PM NOTICE: THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT This event is sold out. If you wish to add your name to the waiting list please call 617-646-0560. ...

This event is sold out. If you wish to add your name to the waiting list please call 617-646-0560.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a panel discussion featuring MHS Fellows Henry N. Cobb and Edward L. Widmer along with Michael K. Frith, William S. Donnell, and Samuel W. Van Dam about Edmund March Wheelwright, the architect of the Society's landmark building and the Harvard Lampoon Castle. The panel will be moderated by Kurt Andersen with additional commentary by John Tittmann, architect for the Castle restoration project.

5:30 to 7:00 PM Symposium
Cocktail reception will follow

More
Public Program, Special Event Clover Adams: Gallery Talk 2 March 2012.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Natalie Dykstra, Guest Curator, Massachusetts Historical Society "Who was Clover Adams?" A gallery talk with guest curator Natalie Dykstra, author of the new ...

"Who was Clover Adams?"

A gallery talk with guest curator Natalie Dykstra, author of the new biography Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life. Natalie Dykstra received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship for her work on Clover Adams. She is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society and an associate professor of English at Hope College in Holland, Michigan.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 3 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

More
Early American History Seminar Ancestry as Social Practice in Eighteenth-Century New England: The Origins of Early Republic Genealogical Vogue 6 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Karin Wulf, College of William and Mary Comment: Laurel Ulrich, Harvard University This paper derives from Wulf's book project on the practice and significance of Anglo-American ...

This paper derives from Wulf's book project on the practice and significance of Anglo-American genealogy from 1680 to 1820. In this chapter she looks at the extensive genealogical work of eighteenth-century New Englanders and positions those labors both as a social practice drawing on and developing communities of knowledge and as a middle chapter in the Anglo-American reckoning with the relationship of family to history. The keenness for genealogy that eighteenth-century New Englanders exhibited reflected a broader Anglo-American interest in lineage as a way of understanding and ordering the world.  

Wulf is particularly interested in the ways that genealogical interest and local history in New England entwined early and regularly, not emerging in the nineteenth century as parallel interests, but as fruits of the same slow growing tree. She uncovers the eighteenth-century source materials that informed early nineteenth century work and explores the contexts for their production--what prompted them, how they insinuated into family memory practices, and how they interacted with public recordation within churches and in towns.

More
Brown Bag Political Appetites: Revolution, Taste, and Culinary Activism in the Early Republic 7 March 2012.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nancy Siegel, Towson University In the eighteenth century, the American colonies were variously referred to as a crumbling cake or ...

In the eighteenth century, the American colonies were variously referred to as a crumbling cake or even a kettle of fish. As the language of food was easily understood, the use of such similes linking food to politics became increasingly popular, revealing the discourse between culinary history and American political thought. This program examines the development of culinary activism in America to include tea boycotts in the 1760s and the use of homebrews such as Liberty Tea; the development and naming of nationalist recipes in praise of the new and fragile nation such as Independence Cake, Federal Pan Cakes, and Election Cake in American cookery books after the Revolution; and the serving of patriotic cakes and teas on imported and domestically produced ceramics. The pots, plates, and platters that held tea and morsels became a meaningful complement: visual partners adorned with patriotic and nationalistic imagery such as American eagles, political figures, or popular American scenery. Seeing this ensemble of artifacts as culinary activism, one finds that through cookery, broad segments of American society could demonstrate their approval of the democratic process, and the very act of dining often conveyed opinions about the American political system. 

More
Conversation, Public Program Reclaiming the Commons: A Conversation with Brian Donahue 7 March 2012.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 P.M. Brian Donohue, Brandeis University Moderated by Steve Marini, Wellesley College Professor Brian Donahue teaches courses on environmental issues, environmental history, sustainable ...

Professor Brian Donahue teaches courses on environmental issues, environmental history, sustainable farming and forestry, and early American culture at Brandeis University. His primary research interests include the history and the prospects of human engagement with the land, especially in New England. He is the author of The Great Meadow and Reclaiming the Commons: Community and Forests in a New England Town.

Considering the Common Good: What We Give Up/What We Gain

In this conversation series, facilitated by Professor Stephen Marini of Wellesley College, guests will address issues of self-interest and shared sacrifice, private concerns and community benefits, and the intersection of individual and collective goals. Using historical and contemporary examples, each guest will illustrate approaches, promises, successes and failures. In the ensuing conversations, guests and audience members will explore the challenges and choices involved in defining and balancing individual freedom and the common good.

Reservations requested: Please call 617-646-0560 or click the ticket icon above to register online.

More
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Policing Migrants and Militants: In Defense of Nation and Empire in the U.S.-Canadian Borderlands 13 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Kornel S. Chang, Rutgers University, Newark Comment: Naoko Shibusawa, Brown University The problem of policing the U.S.-Canadian boundary, initiated under Chinese exclusion in 1882, ...

The problem of policing the U.S.-Canadian boundary, initiated under Chinese exclusion in 1882, evolved into a multi-faceted, multi-racial challenge by the early twentieth century. The threats posed by Chinese and Japanese migrants and smugglers and white and South Asian radicals brought the United States, Canada, and Britain together in defense of national and imperial borders in the North American West. Collectively, these self-proclaimed white men's countries developed a transnational surveillance network to police illegal migrants, monitor and track revolutionary nationalists, and suppress labor militancy and revolt across the U.S.-Canadian boundary and across the Pacific. This presentation looks at the formation of the northern border, showing how it was a product of intercolonial cooperation and exchange in which Anglophone empires supported each other's prerogative to imperial rule in Asia and the Pacific. In doing so, it argues that Asiatic exclusion was as much about defending and preserving the empire as it was about keeping out undesirable and inassimilable foreigners.

More
Public Program, Author Talk POSTPONED: Where We Worked: A Celebration of America's Workers and the Nation They Built 14 March 2012.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Jack Larkin Please visit the calendar entry for May 23, 2012, for more information about this event.

Please visit the calendar entry for May 23, 2012, for more information about this event.

More
Notice BUILDING OPEN; LIBRARY & EXHIBITIONS OPEN 16 March 2012.Friday, all day Power has been restored at the MHS and the research library and exhibition halls will reopen to the ...

Power has been restored at the MHS and the research library and exhibition halls will reopen to the public.  All staff should report to work as scheduled.

More
Brown Bag, Author Talk, Public Program The Rhode Island Campaign: The First French and American Operation of the Revolutionary War 16 March 2012.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christian McBurney Christian McBurney will discuss his new book, the most detailed study of the joint French and ...

Christian McBurney will discuss his new book, the most detailed study of the joint French and American effort to capture the British garrison occupying Newport, Rhode Island, during July and August of 1778. One of the most complex and multi-faceted events of the Revolutionary War, the campaign combined land and sea strategies and featured controversial decisions on both sides. McBurney's lecture will highlight the significant involvement of Boston and Massachusetts in the campaign, including the French Fleet’s arrival in Boston, which led to a riot and then to a memorial that is now part of the Freedom Trail. He will also highlight his research findings from the Society’s archives.

Christian M. McBurney, a graduate of Brown University, is a partner in a Washington, DC, law firm. He is the author of several books and articles on early Rhode Island history, including A History of Kingston, Rhode Island, 1700–1900 and British Treatment of Prisoners During the Occupation of Newport, 1776–1779.

More
Exhibitionends Like a Wolf for the Prey: The Massachusetts Historical Society Collection Begins 17 March 2012.Saturday, Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM In 1790, the Rev. Jeremy Belknap proposed a "Plan for an Antiquarian Society" that would actively ...

In 1790, the Rev. Jeremy Belknap proposed a "Plan for an Antiquarian Society" that would actively collect materials for a "complete history" of the new nation. A year later, Belknap's plan became the "Historical Society"--now the Massachusetts Historical Society--the oldest historical organization in the Western Hemisphere. The ten original members donated books, pamphlets, newspapers, maps and atlases, almanacs, printed sermons, manuscripts, and examples of early Massachusetts coinage from their personal collections. From September 2011 through March 2012, view a selection of the Society's earliest acquisitions in the new Treasures Gallery. The exhibition is free and open to the public, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS exhibition complements "Making History: Antiquaries in Britain," an exhibition celebrating the tercentenary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, now on display at the McMullen Museum at Boston College until December 11, 2011.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 17 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

More
Special Event, Public Program The 1912 Bread and Roses Strike 20 March 2012.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 P.M. Robert Forrant, University of Massachusetts-Lowell and James Green, University of Massachusetts-Boston In January 1912, textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, launched an explosive eight-week strike ...

In January 1912, textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, launched an explosive eight-week strike that popularized the slogan "Bread and Roses." The strikers' victory led to improved working conditions and higher wages for more than 150,000 semi-skilled workers in the New England textile industry. Join Robert Forrant, Professor of Economic and Social Development at UMass Lowell, and a panel of labor historians as they discuss the consequences of the strike in the city of Lawrence and on the strike's participants, many of whom were immigrants, and more than half of whom were women. Panelists will also debate the strike's enduring legacy and how contemporary labor practices and policies reflect the victories won almost one hundred years ago.

Reservations requested: please call 617-646-0560 or click on the ticket icon above to register online. 

More
Biography Seminar Formidable Families: Writing about Famous Brothers and Sisters 22 March 2012.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM George Howe Colt, Paul Fisher, and Louise W. Knight Megan Marshall, Moderator This session, featuring George Howe Colt, Paul Fisher, and Louise W. Knight and moderated by Megan ...

This session, featuring George Howe Colt, Paul Fisher, and Louise W. Knight and moderated by Megan Marshall, will explore the process of developing collective biographies, in particular, research and writing about siblings.  

Panelists:  George Howe Colt is the author of The Big House: A Century in the Life of an American Summer Home, a finalist for the National Book Award in 2003, and November of the Soul: The Enigma of Suicide. He is writing a book about brothers.  

Paul Fisher is a biographer of Henry, William, and Alice James in House of Wits: An Intimate Portrait of the James Family. He is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Wellesley College, where he teaches 19th century American literature and culture.  

Louise W. Knight is the author of Jane Addams: Spirit in Action and Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy.  A Visiting Scholar in the Gender Studies Program, Northwestern University, she is writing a biography of Sarah and Angelina Grimke.  

Moderator: Megan Marshall's The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism won the Francis Parkman Prize and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 24 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

More
Environmental History Seminar CANCELLED The Sea Serpent and the Mackerel Jig: Environment and Culture in Coastal New England Fisheries, 1815-1859 27 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Jeff Bolster, University of New Hampshire Comment: Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University We regret to announce that this program has been cancelled and will not be rescheduled.

We regret to announce that this program has been cancelled and will not be rescheduled.

More
Boston Theatre, Federal Street, Engraving by A. Bowen, 1825 Exhibitionbegins The First Seasons of the Federal Street Theatre, 1794-1798 28 March 2012.Wednesday, Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM In 1794, the first public theater in Boston opened on Federal Street despite strong legal and public ...

Boston Theatre, Federal Street, Engraving by A. Bowen, 1825In 1794, the first public theater in Boston opened on Federal Street despite strong legal and public opposition. The First Seasons of the Federal Street Theatre, 1794-1798 documents the battle over the Federal Street Theatre through playbills from early performances as well as the letters and publications of supporters and opponents of public theater in Boston. The MHS show is a satellite display of an exhibition titled Forgotten Chapters of Boston's Literary History on display at the Boston Public Library (BPL). Created by Professor Paul Lewis of the Boston College English Department and his students, the exhibition tells stories about Boston's literary history through letters, manuscripts, and early editions from the collections of the MHS, the BPL, the American Antiquarian Society, and Boston College. Divided into six “chapters,”  the exhibition follows the rise and fall of reputations, recovers out-of-print materials, and walks the streets of Boston in its literary heyday. The materials at the MHS will be on view 28 March through 30 July.

More
Member Event New Fellows & Members Reception & Tour 29 March 2012.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM All new MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour of the Society. This is ...


All new MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour of the Society. This is a rare opportunity to go behind the scenes of the MHS to see how we collect and preserve the documents that define American history and make them accessible to the public.

6:00 PM Reception
6:30 PM Tour

Space is limited. RSVP online or by calling 617-646-0560.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 31 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

More
More events
Member Event The Architecture of Edmund March Wheelwright and the Building of the Harvard Lampoon Castle 1 March 2012.Thursday, 5:30PM - 8:30PM NOTICE: THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

This event is sold out. If you wish to add your name to the waiting list please call 617-646-0560.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a panel discussion featuring MHS Fellows Henry N. Cobb and Edward L. Widmer along with Michael K. Frith, William S. Donnell, and Samuel W. Van Dam about Edmund March Wheelwright, the architect of the Society's landmark building and the Harvard Lampoon Castle. The panel will be moderated by Kurt Andersen with additional commentary by John Tittmann, architect for the Castle restoration project.

5:30 to 7:00 PM Symposium
Cocktail reception will follow

close

Public Program, Special Event Clover Adams: Gallery Talk 2 March 2012.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Natalie Dykstra, Guest Curator, Massachusetts Historical Society

"Who was Clover Adams?"

A gallery talk with guest curator Natalie Dykstra, author of the new biography Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life. Natalie Dykstra received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship for her work on Clover Adams. She is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society and an associate professor of English at Hope College in Holland, Michigan.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 3 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close

Early American History Seminar Ancestry as Social Practice in Eighteenth-Century New England: The Origins of Early Republic Genealogical Vogue 6 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Karin Wulf, College of William and Mary Comment: Laurel Ulrich, Harvard University

This paper derives from Wulf's book project on the practice and significance of Anglo-American genealogy from 1680 to 1820. In this chapter she looks at the extensive genealogical work of eighteenth-century New Englanders and positions those labors both as a social practice drawing on and developing communities of knowledge and as a middle chapter in the Anglo-American reckoning with the relationship of family to history. The keenness for genealogy that eighteenth-century New Englanders exhibited reflected a broader Anglo-American interest in lineage as a way of understanding and ordering the world.  

Wulf is particularly interested in the ways that genealogical interest and local history in New England entwined early and regularly, not emerging in the nineteenth century as parallel interests, but as fruits of the same slow growing tree. She uncovers the eighteenth-century source materials that informed early nineteenth century work and explores the contexts for their production--what prompted them, how they insinuated into family memory practices, and how they interacted with public recordation within churches and in towns.

close

Brown Bag Political Appetites: Revolution, Taste, and Culinary Activism in the Early Republic 7 March 2012.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nancy Siegel, Towson University

In the eighteenth century, the American colonies were variously referred to as a crumbling cake or even a kettle of fish. As the language of food was easily understood, the use of such similes linking food to politics became increasingly popular, revealing the discourse between culinary history and American political thought. This program examines the development of culinary activism in America to include tea boycotts in the 1760s and the use of homebrews such as Liberty Tea; the development and naming of nationalist recipes in praise of the new and fragile nation such as Independence Cake, Federal Pan Cakes, and Election Cake in American cookery books after the Revolution; and the serving of patriotic cakes and teas on imported and domestically produced ceramics. The pots, plates, and platters that held tea and morsels became a meaningful complement: visual partners adorned with patriotic and nationalistic imagery such as American eagles, political figures, or popular American scenery. Seeing this ensemble of artifacts as culinary activism, one finds that through cookery, broad segments of American society could demonstrate their approval of the democratic process, and the very act of dining often conveyed opinions about the American political system. 

close

Conversation, Public Program Reclaiming the Commons: A Conversation with Brian Donahue 7 March 2012.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 P.M. Brian Donohue, Brandeis University Moderated by Steve Marini, Wellesley College

Professor Brian Donahue teaches courses on environmental issues, environmental history, sustainable farming and forestry, and early American culture at Brandeis University. His primary research interests include the history and the prospects of human engagement with the land, especially in New England. He is the author of The Great Meadow and Reclaiming the Commons: Community and Forests in a New England Town.

Considering the Common Good: What We Give Up/What We Gain

In this conversation series, facilitated by Professor Stephen Marini of Wellesley College, guests will address issues of self-interest and shared sacrifice, private concerns and community benefits, and the intersection of individual and collective goals. Using historical and contemporary examples, each guest will illustrate approaches, promises, successes and failures. In the ensuing conversations, guests and audience members will explore the challenges and choices involved in defining and balancing individual freedom and the common good.

Reservations requested: Please call 617-646-0560 or click the ticket icon above to register online.

close

Immigration and Urban History Seminar Policing Migrants and Militants: In Defense of Nation and Empire in the U.S.-Canadian Borderlands 13 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Kornel S. Chang, Rutgers University, Newark Comment: Naoko Shibusawa, Brown University

The problem of policing the U.S.-Canadian boundary, initiated under Chinese exclusion in 1882, evolved into a multi-faceted, multi-racial challenge by the early twentieth century. The threats posed by Chinese and Japanese migrants and smugglers and white and South Asian radicals brought the United States, Canada, and Britain together in defense of national and imperial borders in the North American West. Collectively, these self-proclaimed white men's countries developed a transnational surveillance network to police illegal migrants, monitor and track revolutionary nationalists, and suppress labor militancy and revolt across the U.S.-Canadian boundary and across the Pacific. This presentation looks at the formation of the northern border, showing how it was a product of intercolonial cooperation and exchange in which Anglophone empires supported each other's prerogative to imperial rule in Asia and the Pacific. In doing so, it argues that Asiatic exclusion was as much about defending and preserving the empire as it was about keeping out undesirable and inassimilable foreigners.

close

Public Program, Author Talk POSTPONED: Where We Worked: A Celebration of America's Workers and the Nation They Built 14 March 2012.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Jack Larkin

Please visit the calendar entry for May 23, 2012, for more information about this event.

close

Notice BUILDING OPEN; LIBRARY & EXHIBITIONS OPEN 16 March 2012.Friday, all day

Power has been restored at the MHS and the research library and exhibition halls will reopen to the public.  All staff should report to work as scheduled.

close

Brown Bag, Author Talk, Public Program The Rhode Island Campaign: The First French and American Operation of the Revolutionary War 16 March 2012.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christian McBurney

Christian McBurney will discuss his new book, the most detailed study of the joint French and American effort to capture the British garrison occupying Newport, Rhode Island, during July and August of 1778. One of the most complex and multi-faceted events of the Revolutionary War, the campaign combined land and sea strategies and featured controversial decisions on both sides. McBurney's lecture will highlight the significant involvement of Boston and Massachusetts in the campaign, including the French Fleet’s arrival in Boston, which led to a riot and then to a memorial that is now part of the Freedom Trail. He will also highlight his research findings from the Society’s archives.

Christian M. McBurney, a graduate of Brown University, is a partner in a Washington, DC, law firm. He is the author of several books and articles on early Rhode Island history, including A History of Kingston, Rhode Island, 1700–1900 and British Treatment of Prisoners During the Occupation of Newport, 1776–1779.

close

Exhibition Like a Wolf for the Prey: The Massachusetts Historical Society Collection Begins Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM

In 1790, the Rev. Jeremy Belknap proposed a "Plan for an Antiquarian Society" that would actively collect materials for a "complete history" of the new nation. A year later, Belknap's plan became the "Historical Society"--now the Massachusetts Historical Society--the oldest historical organization in the Western Hemisphere. The ten original members donated books, pamphlets, newspapers, maps and atlases, almanacs, printed sermons, manuscripts, and examples of early Massachusetts coinage from their personal collections. From September 2011 through March 2012, view a selection of the Society's earliest acquisitions in the new Treasures Gallery. The exhibition is free and open to the public, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS exhibition complements "Making History: Antiquaries in Britain," an exhibition celebrating the tercentenary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, now on display at the McMullen Museum at Boston College until December 11, 2011.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 17 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close

Special Event, Public Program The 1912 Bread and Roses Strike 20 March 2012.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 P.M. Robert Forrant, University of Massachusetts-Lowell and James Green, University of Massachusetts-Boston

In January 1912, textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, launched an explosive eight-week strike that popularized the slogan "Bread and Roses." The strikers' victory led to improved working conditions and higher wages for more than 150,000 semi-skilled workers in the New England textile industry. Join Robert Forrant, Professor of Economic and Social Development at UMass Lowell, and a panel of labor historians as they discuss the consequences of the strike in the city of Lawrence and on the strike's participants, many of whom were immigrants, and more than half of whom were women. Panelists will also debate the strike's enduring legacy and how contemporary labor practices and policies reflect the victories won almost one hundred years ago.

Reservations requested: please call 617-646-0560 or click on the ticket icon above to register online. 

close

Biography Seminar Formidable Families: Writing about Famous Brothers and Sisters 22 March 2012.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM George Howe Colt, Paul Fisher, and Louise W. Knight Megan Marshall, Moderator

This session, featuring George Howe Colt, Paul Fisher, and Louise W. Knight and moderated by Megan Marshall, will explore the process of developing collective biographies, in particular, research and writing about siblings.  

Panelists:  George Howe Colt is the author of The Big House: A Century in the Life of an American Summer Home, a finalist for the National Book Award in 2003, and November of the Soul: The Enigma of Suicide. He is writing a book about brothers.  

Paul Fisher is a biographer of Henry, William, and Alice James in House of Wits: An Intimate Portrait of the James Family. He is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Wellesley College, where he teaches 19th century American literature and culture.  

Louise W. Knight is the author of Jane Addams: Spirit in Action and Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy.  A Visiting Scholar in the Gender Studies Program, Northwestern University, she is writing a biography of Sarah and Angelina Grimke.  

Moderator: Megan Marshall's The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism won the Francis Parkman Prize and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 24 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close

Environmental History Seminar CANCELLED The Sea Serpent and the Mackerel Jig: Environment and Culture in Coastal New England Fisheries, 1815-1859 27 March 2012.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:15PM Jeff Bolster, University of New Hampshire Comment: Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University

We regret to announce that this program has been cancelled and will not be rescheduled.

close

Exhibition The First Seasons of the Federal Street Theatre, 1794-1798 28 March 2012 to 30 July 2012 Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM Boston Theatre, Federal Street, Engraving by A. Bowen, 1825

Boston Theatre, Federal Street, Engraving by A. Bowen, 1825In 1794, the first public theater in Boston opened on Federal Street despite strong legal and public opposition. The First Seasons of the Federal Street Theatre, 1794-1798 documents the battle over the Federal Street Theatre through playbills from early performances as well as the letters and publications of supporters and opponents of public theater in Boston. The MHS show is a satellite display of an exhibition titled Forgotten Chapters of Boston's Literary History on display at the Boston Public Library (BPL). Created by Professor Paul Lewis of the Boston College English Department and his students, the exhibition tells stories about Boston's literary history through letters, manuscripts, and early editions from the collections of the MHS, the BPL, the American Antiquarian Society, and Boston College. Divided into six “chapters,”  the exhibition follows the rise and fall of reputations, recovers out-of-print materials, and walks the streets of Boston in its literary heyday. The materials at the MHS will be on view 28 March through 30 July.

close

Member Event New Fellows & Members Reception & Tour 29 March 2012.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM


All new MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour of the Society. This is a rare opportunity to go behind the scenes of the MHS to see how we collect and preserve the documents that define American history and make them accessible to the public.

6:00 PM Reception
6:30 PM Tour

Space is limited. RSVP online or by calling 617-646-0560.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 31 March 2012.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour.  For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close


    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events