May 2015
MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 2 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

More
Public Program, Conversation May Day Mayday! 2 May 2015.Saturday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a 5:30 reception before the 6:00 pm program William Fowler, Nathaniel Philbrick, and Michael Tougias $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) From its founding, Massachusetts has looked towards the sea. Merchant trade, fishing, and whaling ...

From its founding, Massachusetts has looked towards the sea. Merchant trade, fishing, and whaling were the engines that drove the New England economy. However, the bounty of the sea was not without cost. Shipwrecks, disasters, and heroic rescues are staples of maritime history. This special evening at MHS will feature three eminent historians telling stories of catastrophes at sea and reflecting on the evening’s tales.

William Fowler is the author of a number of books dealing with American history including: Under Two Flags: The Navy in the Civil WarSilas Talbot Captain of the Old Ironsides; co-author America and The SeaWilliam Ellery: A Rhode Island Politico and Lord of AdmiraltyRebels Under Sail: The Navy in the RevolutionJack Tars and Commodores: The American Navy, 1783-1815Samuel Adams: Radical PuritanEmpires at War: The French and Indian War and The Struggle for North America, 1754-1763. He is the former Gay Hart Gaines Distinguished Fellow in American History at Mount Vernon. He has taught at Mystic Seaport Museum and has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution, the United States Naval War College, and the Sea Education Association.

Nathaniel Philbrick is the author of In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the 2000 National Book Award and soon to be a major motion picture directed by Ron Howard; Sea of Glory, winner of the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Naval History Prize; Mayflower, a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in history; Bunker Hill, winner of the New England Book Award, and other bestselling works of American history.  He lives on Nantucket Island.   

Michael Tougias is an award winning author and co-author of 23 books. Among his bestsellers are A Storm Too Soon, The Finest Hours (soon to be a major motion picture by Disney), Fatal ForecastOverboard, and King Philip's War. He is a sought-after inspirational speaker to business groups such as John Hancock, Raytheon, General Dynamics, and the Gulf Coast CEO's.

More
Early American History Seminar "All Manner of Slavery Servitude Labour Service Bondage and Hire": Varieties of Indian and African Unfreedom in Colonial New England and Jamaica 5 May 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Linford Fisher, Brown University Comment: Jennifer Anderson, SUNY - Stonybrook New England and Jamaica seemed worlds apart during the colonial period, on the surface at least. But ...

New England and Jamaica seemed worlds apart during the colonial period, on the surface at least. But is it possible that there was more than meets the eye? This paper investigates varying ways that people of color labored in Jamaica and New England, and how these unfree circumstances changed over time.

More
Brown Bag Slave Horse: The Narragansett Pacer 6 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among ...

This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among people, colonies, and nations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Part of a larger book project on horses throughout the Atlantic World, it focuses specifically on the Narragansett Pacer, a mixture of Dutch, Irish, and English breeds that was bred in Rhode Island for a wider global market. As such, it was entwined with slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. The first truly “American” horse, the Pacer was extinct by the nineteenth century.

More
MHS Tour History and the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 9 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

More
Utopian Settlements Series Public Program, Author Talk Puritan Paradise: Eden in Massachusetts Bay & Beyond 13 May 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Zachary Hutchins, Assistant Professor of English – Colorado State University Utopian Settlements SeriesProgram 1 Thomas More’s Utopia was inspired ...

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 1

Thomas More’s Utopia was inspired by paradisiacal descriptions of the New World, and associations between Eden and the Americas persisted throughout the colonial period. Many of the immigrants arriving in New England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries looked to the biblical garden of Adam and Eve as a pattern of the ideal society they wished to build. Religiously-minded colonists modeled the English language after the Adamic tongue, cited Genesis during debates over natural law, and looked to the prelapsarian Eve as a physiological ideal. A belief in Eden’s historicity and the future return of paradisiacal conditions inspired Quakers to disrobe in public and led to the first judicial decision abolishing slavery in United States history. New England settlers striving to invent Eden’s perfections anew shaped American history and culture in lasting ways; their visions of paradise linger in the theology of prophets from Robert Matthews to Joseph Smith and in the enduring myth of the “self-made man.”

Zach Hutchins is Assistant Professor of English at Colorado State University, where he teaches courses on early American literature and culture. His talk will draw on research recently published in his first book, Inventing Eden: Primitivism, Millennialism, and the Making of New England (Oxford UP; 2014). Hutchins is also the author of a dozen essays that have appeared in journals such as The New England Quarterly, ELH, Shakespeare, and Early American Literature. A New England native, he returns to Massachusetts regularly to wield a clamshell hoe in the garden of his aged parents, the last two surviving Puritans. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. Puritan Paradise with Zachary Hutchins is the first program in the series. Mr. Ripley's Utopia with Peter Drummey will take place on Wednesday, 20 May. Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist will take place on Wednesday, 27 May. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

More
MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 16 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

More
Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:45 PM 19 May 2015.Tuesday, all day More
Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Slavery in Early Massachusetts 19 May 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Barbara A. Mathews, Historic Deerfield, and Gloria McCahon Whiting, Harvard University Maria A. Bollettino, Framingham State University This session will consider two papers. “‘Is this where Titus lived?’ Researching ...

This session will consider two papers. “‘Is this where Titus lived?’ Researching and Interpreting African-American Presence in 18th-Century Rural New England,” by Barbara A. Mathews, and “The Body of Liberties and Bodies in Bondage: Dorcas the Blackmore, Dorchester’s First Church, and the Legalization of Slavery in the Anglo-Atlantic World,” by Gloria McCahon Whiting.

Mathews’s paper draws on a remarkable cache of documentation preserved by early antiquarians of Deerfield, Massachusetts. It discusses the preliminary results of research into slavery in the 18th-century town, focusing on the ways in which slavery was inextricably bound up in the social, economic, and political web that defined a closely-knit rural community. Drawing on the work of Joanne Pope Melish, it also explores the broader implications of this history and its preservation even as Deerfielders in company with other New Englanders disassociated themselves in the decades before and after the Civil War from the region’s slave-holding history.

Whiting’s paper contextualizes the lived experience of one of the Bay Colony’s first African slaves to argue that slavery was bound up with democracy in the colony’s early years; that race shaped servitude from the colony’s founding; that Puritan religion provided slaves with unique opportunities for family building; that family was linked to freedom for the region’s early blacks; that Africans were building kin networks—and whites were recognizing them—from the first decades of Puritan settlement; and that the histories of whites and blacks, of powerful men and their polyglot households, and of law and social relations are inextricably linked.

More
Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:30 PM 20 May 2015.Wednesday, all day More
Utopian Settlements Series Public Program, Walking Tour Mr. Ripley’s Utopia - SOLD OUT 20 May 2015.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM Lecture and tour at Brook Farm (670 Baker Street in West Roxbury, entrance shared with the Gardens at Gethsemane) Peter Drummey, Stephen T. Riley Librarian (MHS) and Maggi Brown, Regional Interpretive Coordinator (DCR) Utopian Settlements SeriesProgram 2 Brook Farm, the utopian community established ...

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 2

Brook Farm, the utopian community established by George and Sophia Ripley in West Roxbury, lasted only from 1841 to 1847, but it became the country’s most celebrated experiment in Transcendentalism as a social movement. By opening the benefits of education and the profits of labor to all, the Brook Farm Association sought to prepare a society of liberal, intelligent, and cultivated men and women, whose relations with each other would permit a simple and wholesome life, apart from the competitive pressures found beyond the boundaries of the Farm. 

Peter Drummey, the Historical Society’s Stephen T. Riley Librarian (and a volunteer during the archaeological investigation of Brook Farm), will lead a discussion of what Brook Farmers attempted, what they accomplished, and why they failed as well as describing the manuscript records of the Association held by MHS.  This talk will be followed by a DCR tour of Brook Farm, led by DCR staff. We will explore the quiet woodlands and wetlands that inspired the likes of Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Ripley. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. The final program in the series, Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist, will take place on Wednesday, 27 May. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

More
Library Closed Memorial Day 23 May 2015.Saturday, all day The MHS library is closed. 

The MHS library is closed. 

More
Library Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2015.Monday, all day The MHS library is closed. 

The MHS library is closed. 

More
Brown Bag Purity and Power: The American Sugar Empire in the Gilded Age 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Singerman, MIT In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar ...

In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar magnate Edwin Atkins, a key architect of that empire, owned New England refineries, Atlantic shipping lines, and Cuban plantations. By following Atkins’s machinations from the White House to the customs house, we can see how U.S. attempts to govern labor and nature overseas were linked to the most contentious issues of Gilded Age political economy: corruption, free trade, and monopoly power.

More
Utopian Settlements Series Public Program, Conversation Fruitlands 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Jan Turnquist, Executive Director of Orchard House Utopian Settlements SeriesProgram 3 Jan Turnquist, Executive Director of Orchard ...

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 3

Jan Turnquist, Executive Director of Orchard House, the Alcott family home in Concord will give a living history presentation of Louisa May Alcott. Looking back on her time at Fruitlands, the author of Little Women will give us the behind the scenes stories from her life: family friendships with Thoreau and Emerson; her unconventional upbringing in poverty; and the family love that inspired her to write an American classic. From the youngest reader to the most sophisticated Alcott scholar, audiences have acclaimed Turnquist’s performances. The interactive presentation is an inspiring experience is open to all ages. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist is the final program in the series. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

More
Member Event, Special Event The Court and the World with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer 28 May 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM This event is SOLD OUT. If you would like to put your name on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. MHS Fellows and ...

If you would like to put your name on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special event with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

5:30 pm: Reception
6:30 pm: Remarks by Justice Stephen Breyer

This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. Become a Member today!

More
MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 30 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

More
More events
MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 2 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

close

Public Program, Conversation May Day Mayday! 2 May 2015.Saturday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a 5:30 reception before the 6:00 pm program William Fowler, Nathaniel Philbrick, and Michael Tougias $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

From its founding, Massachusetts has looked towards the sea. Merchant trade, fishing, and whaling were the engines that drove the New England economy. However, the bounty of the sea was not without cost. Shipwrecks, disasters, and heroic rescues are staples of maritime history. This special evening at MHS will feature three eminent historians telling stories of catastrophes at sea and reflecting on the evening’s tales.

William Fowler is the author of a number of books dealing with American history including: Under Two Flags: The Navy in the Civil WarSilas Talbot Captain of the Old Ironsides; co-author America and The SeaWilliam Ellery: A Rhode Island Politico and Lord of AdmiraltyRebels Under Sail: The Navy in the RevolutionJack Tars and Commodores: The American Navy, 1783-1815Samuel Adams: Radical PuritanEmpires at War: The French and Indian War and The Struggle for North America, 1754-1763. He is the former Gay Hart Gaines Distinguished Fellow in American History at Mount Vernon. He has taught at Mystic Seaport Museum and has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution, the United States Naval War College, and the Sea Education Association.

Nathaniel Philbrick is the author of In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the 2000 National Book Award and soon to be a major motion picture directed by Ron Howard; Sea of Glory, winner of the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Naval History Prize; Mayflower, a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in history; Bunker Hill, winner of the New England Book Award, and other bestselling works of American history.  He lives on Nantucket Island.   

Michael Tougias is an award winning author and co-author of 23 books. Among his bestsellers are A Storm Too Soon, The Finest Hours (soon to be a major motion picture by Disney), Fatal ForecastOverboard, and King Philip's War. He is a sought-after inspirational speaker to business groups such as John Hancock, Raytheon, General Dynamics, and the Gulf Coast CEO's.

close

Early American History Seminar "All Manner of Slavery Servitude Labour Service Bondage and Hire": Varieties of Indian and African Unfreedom in Colonial New England and Jamaica 5 May 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Linford Fisher, Brown University Comment: Jennifer Anderson, SUNY - Stonybrook

New England and Jamaica seemed worlds apart during the colonial period, on the surface at least. But is it possible that there was more than meets the eye? This paper investigates varying ways that people of color labored in Jamaica and New England, and how these unfree circumstances changed over time.

close

Brown Bag Slave Horse: The Narragansett Pacer 6 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University

This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among people, colonies, and nations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Part of a larger book project on horses throughout the Atlantic World, it focuses specifically on the Narragansett Pacer, a mixture of Dutch, Irish, and English breeds that was bred in Rhode Island for a wider global market. As such, it was entwined with slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. The first truly “American” horse, the Pacer was extinct by the nineteenth century.

close

MHS Tour History and the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 9 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

close

Public Program, Author Talk Puritan Paradise: Eden in Massachusetts Bay & Beyond 13 May 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Zachary Hutchins, Assistant Professor of English – Colorado State University Utopian Settlements Series

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 1

Thomas More’s Utopia was inspired by paradisiacal descriptions of the New World, and associations between Eden and the Americas persisted throughout the colonial period. Many of the immigrants arriving in New England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries looked to the biblical garden of Adam and Eve as a pattern of the ideal society they wished to build. Religiously-minded colonists modeled the English language after the Adamic tongue, cited Genesis during debates over natural law, and looked to the prelapsarian Eve as a physiological ideal. A belief in Eden’s historicity and the future return of paradisiacal conditions inspired Quakers to disrobe in public and led to the first judicial decision abolishing slavery in United States history. New England settlers striving to invent Eden’s perfections anew shaped American history and culture in lasting ways; their visions of paradise linger in the theology of prophets from Robert Matthews to Joseph Smith and in the enduring myth of the “self-made man.”

Zach Hutchins is Assistant Professor of English at Colorado State University, where he teaches courses on early American literature and culture. His talk will draw on research recently published in his first book, Inventing Eden: Primitivism, Millennialism, and the Making of New England (Oxford UP; 2014). Hutchins is also the author of a dozen essays that have appeared in journals such as The New England Quarterly, ELH, Shakespeare, and Early American Literature. A New England native, he returns to Massachusetts regularly to wield a clamshell hoe in the garden of his aged parents, the last two surviving Puritans. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. Puritan Paradise with Zachary Hutchins is the first program in the series. Mr. Ripley's Utopia with Peter Drummey will take place on Wednesday, 20 May. Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist will take place on Wednesday, 27 May. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

close

MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 16 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

close

Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:45 PM 19 May 2015.Tuesday, all day close

Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Slavery in Early Massachusetts 19 May 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Barbara A. Mathews, Historic Deerfield, and Gloria McCahon Whiting, Harvard University Maria A. Bollettino, Framingham State University

This session will consider two papers. “‘Is this where Titus lived?’ Researching and Interpreting African-American Presence in 18th-Century Rural New England,” by Barbara A. Mathews, and “The Body of Liberties and Bodies in Bondage: Dorcas the Blackmore, Dorchester’s First Church, and the Legalization of Slavery in the Anglo-Atlantic World,” by Gloria McCahon Whiting.

Mathews’s paper draws on a remarkable cache of documentation preserved by early antiquarians of Deerfield, Massachusetts. It discusses the preliminary results of research into slavery in the 18th-century town, focusing on the ways in which slavery was inextricably bound up in the social, economic, and political web that defined a closely-knit rural community. Drawing on the work of Joanne Pope Melish, it also explores the broader implications of this history and its preservation even as Deerfielders in company with other New Englanders disassociated themselves in the decades before and after the Civil War from the region’s slave-holding history.

Whiting’s paper contextualizes the lived experience of one of the Bay Colony’s first African slaves to argue that slavery was bound up with democracy in the colony’s early years; that race shaped servitude from the colony’s founding; that Puritan religion provided slaves with unique opportunities for family building; that family was linked to freedom for the region’s early blacks; that Africans were building kin networks—and whites were recognizing them—from the first decades of Puritan settlement; and that the histories of whites and blacks, of powerful men and their polyglot households, and of law and social relations are inextricably linked.

close

Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:30 PM 20 May 2015.Wednesday, all day close

Public Program, Walking Tour Mr. Ripley’s Utopia - SOLD OUT 20 May 2015.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM Lecture and tour at Brook Farm (670 Baker Street in West Roxbury, entrance shared with the Gardens at Gethsemane) Peter Drummey, Stephen T. Riley Librarian (MHS) and Maggi Brown, Regional Interpretive Coordinator (DCR) Utopian Settlements Series

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 2

Brook Farm, the utopian community established by George and Sophia Ripley in West Roxbury, lasted only from 1841 to 1847, but it became the country’s most celebrated experiment in Transcendentalism as a social movement. By opening the benefits of education and the profits of labor to all, the Brook Farm Association sought to prepare a society of liberal, intelligent, and cultivated men and women, whose relations with each other would permit a simple and wholesome life, apart from the competitive pressures found beyond the boundaries of the Farm. 

Peter Drummey, the Historical Society’s Stephen T. Riley Librarian (and a volunteer during the archaeological investigation of Brook Farm), will lead a discussion of what Brook Farmers attempted, what they accomplished, and why they failed as well as describing the manuscript records of the Association held by MHS.  This talk will be followed by a DCR tour of Brook Farm, led by DCR staff. We will explore the quiet woodlands and wetlands that inspired the likes of Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Ripley. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. The final program in the series, Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist, will take place on Wednesday, 27 May. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

close

Library Closed Memorial Day 23 May 2015.Saturday, all day

The MHS library is closed. 

close

Library Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2015.Monday, all day

The MHS library is closed. 

close

Brown Bag Purity and Power: The American Sugar Empire in the Gilded Age 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Singerman, MIT

In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar magnate Edwin Atkins, a key architect of that empire, owned New England refineries, Atlantic shipping lines, and Cuban plantations. By following Atkins’s machinations from the White House to the customs house, we can see how U.S. attempts to govern labor and nature overseas were linked to the most contentious issues of Gilded Age political economy: corruption, free trade, and monopoly power.

close

Public Program, Conversation Fruitlands 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Jan Turnquist, Executive Director of Orchard House Utopian Settlements Series

Utopian Settlements Series
Program 3

Jan Turnquist, Executive Director of Orchard House, the Alcott family home in Concord will give a living history presentation of Louisa May Alcott. Looking back on her time at Fruitlands, the author of Little Women will give us the behind the scenes stories from her life: family friendships with Thoreau and Emerson; her unconventional upbringing in poverty; and the family love that inspired her to write an American classic. From the youngest reader to the most sophisticated Alcott scholar, audiences have acclaimed Turnquist’s performances. The interactive presentation is an inspiring experience is open to all ages. 


Utopian Settlements Series

New Englanders have a long tradition of separating from society and trying to create a more perfect world. From the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Yankees have dreamed of a better world and tried to make it real. This series will explore the history of three utopian settlements that started in our backyard. Fruitlands with Jan Turnquist is the final program in the series. We are thankful to the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) for its support of this series.

close

Member Event, Special Event The Court and the World with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer 28 May 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM This event is SOLD OUT.

If you would like to put your name on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special event with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

5:30 pm: Reception
6:30 pm: Remarks by Justice Stephen Breyer

This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. Become a Member today!

close

MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 30 May 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

close


    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events