October

Terra Firma Member Event, Special Event Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection Preview Reception 1 October 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The exhibition celebrates the beginnings of one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections. The first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in American, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont will be on view along with battle maps and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

6:00 PM: Remarks by Peter Drummey, MHS
6:30 PM: Reception and preview of the exhibition 

Become a Member today!

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Always Your Friend Exhibitionbegins "Always Your Friend": Letters from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge, 1884-1918 2 October 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM One of the Society's most interesting collections of presidential papers consists of the extensive ...

One of the Society's most interesting collections of presidential papers consists of the extensive personal correspondence of Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge. From 1884 until just before Roosevelt's death in 1919, the two friends and their spouses exchanged hundreds of letters, notes, telegrams, annotated copies of speeches, newspaper articles, and photographs. "Always Your Friend" highlights selections from this remarkable collection.

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Terra Firma Exhibitionbegins Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection 2 October 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its ...

As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its most diverse and interesting collections. Among the maps on display are landmarks of map publishing that include the first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in America, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont, as well as maps of important battles and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

Learn more about four of the mapmakers at www.masshist.org/terrafirma.

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Teacher Workshop Canceled: Painless: A Survival Guide to the (Dreaded) History Project 3 October 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM Are you a teacher who dreads teaching & grading the same old history projects ...

Are you a teacher who dreads teaching & grading the same old history projects each year?Are you interested in immersing your students in the excitement of historical investigation? Then this workshop is for you!

Are you a student who dreads researching & writing some boring history project? Are you interested in discovering the excitement of original investigation, but unsure of how to proceed? Then this workshop is for you!

Using the broad theme of “Exploration, Encounters, and Exchange in History” as a springboard, you’ll dive in to the research process and discover how to use primary sources to uncover the nineteenth-century global adventures of Massachusetts men and women.You’ll collect evidence, analyze information, draw conclusions, assemble your findings into an historical narrative, and design a history project as a paper, website, exhibit, documentary, or performance. By applying National History Day methodologies, the “dreaded” history project is transformed into the creation of imaginative, engaging, and meaningful history experiences. Representatives from Massachusetts History Day will be on hand to share how the program works.

This program is open to students, teachers, librarians, and archivists. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points.

Date: Saturday, October 3, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Fee: $10 (Free for students and teachers accompanied by students)

To Register / For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 3 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World 5 October 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Andrea Wulf $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. They will be hosting ...

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. They will be hosting Andrea Wulf on October 6 for a talk on the Brother Gardeners. Click here for more information on their program

Andrea Wulf reveals in her new book the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax–infested Siberia. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets such as Darwin, Wordsworth and Goethe but also politicians such as Jefferson. Wulf also argues that it was Humboldt’s influence that led John Muir to his ideas of preservation and that shaped Thoreau’s ‘Walden’. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in Britain. She is the author of several acclaimed books. ‘The Brother Gardeners’ won the American Horticultural Society 2010 Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2008. Her book ‘Founding Gardeners’ was on the New York Times Best Seller List. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. In 2014 she co-presented a four-part BBC TV garden series and she appears regularly on radio.

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Early American History Seminar Copley’s Cato or, The Art of Slavery in the Age of British Liberty 6 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jane Kamensky, Harvard University Comment: David L. Waldstreicher, Graduate Center, CUNY These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color,  ...

These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color, pull at a knotty thread in Copley’s biography as it did through his world: the tangle of slavery and liberty. We follow the artist as he became, like many in his place and time, an owner of men and women. Shortly thereafter, the painter pioneered images that revolutionized the portrayal of people of African descent in Western art. Our discussion will explore the seeming contradiction between the roles bondspeople played in Copley’s American household and upon his epic British canvases.

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Brown Bag Subsistence, Society, Commerce, and Culture in the Atlantic World in the Age of Revolution 7 October 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cynthia Bouton, Texas A&M University This book project studies staple food production, marketplace interaction, entangled trade networks ...

This book project studies staple food production, marketplace interaction, entangled trade networks, government policies, and consumer practices to understand shifting food regimes and food security issues in the international Atlantic during the era of revolutions (1770s-1820s). Case studies from Spanish-, French-, and English-language archives trace food networks carrying wheat/flour, corn, and rice around the Atlantic in a context of Atlantic-wide demographic change, imperial rivalry, intellectual ferment, and global warfare.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Capitalism, Carceral Culture, and the Domestication of Working Women in the Early American City 8 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Schlesinger Library Jen Manion, Connecticut College Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both ...

Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both manufacturing and punishment in the nascent years of industrial capitalism. Arrest and imprisonment was an occupational hazard for hucksters, sex workers, and tippling house operators, while the penitentiary imposed ideals of femininity defined by whiteness, domesticity, and submission on the poor working women behind its walls.

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Public Program Terra Firma: Too Big to Show 9 October 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Mary Yacovone, MHS An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see ...

An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see atlases such as the Atlantic Neptune and understand how they were actually used.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 10 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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MHS doors Public Program Opening Our Doors - Open House 12 October 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and ...

OOD 2015Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and culturalevents. Stop by to see a special one-day display of “Doors from the MHS Collections,”including items such as Thomas Jefferson’s detail drawings of Monticello and photo studiesof the North End. Visitors can also enjoy the Society’s fall exhibitions, Terra Firma:The Beginnings of the Society’s Map Collection; and “Always Your Friend”: Letters betweenTheodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge.

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Library Closed Columbus Day 12 October 2015.Monday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.

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Environmental History Seminar How Rachel Carson Became a Revolutionary: Environmental Politics and the Public Sphere 13 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM David Hecht, Bowdoin College Comment: Chris Bosso, Northeastern University Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental ...

Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental movement. However, this paper contends that Rachel Carson’s legacy is more mixed than the historical memory about her allows. This essay considers the surprisingly varied reception of Silent Spring over the last five decades. Ultimately, it argues, that assessment that Carson's work was revolutionary reflects the vicissitudes of environmental politics as much as anything intrinsic to the book itself.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 1—Turning the City Around, 1945–1970 14 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Lizabeth Cohen, Frank Del Vecchio, Mel King, and David Fixler - Moderator: Tunney Lee $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) SOLD OUT! At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response ...

SOLD OUT!

At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response to the drab financial forecast, planners and politicians began to assemble the tools necessary to chart the city’s development which led to the creation of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). The broad powers granted to the BRA created one of the most powerful planning agencies in the country. It soon became a crucible for national urban policy. Though the period was economically difficult for many—early plans displaced neighborhoods and created an organized and skeptical population—Boston became the center of some of the most creative planning and architecture in the country.

Panelists
Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Harvard University
Frank DelVecchio, retired attorney
Mel King, community organizer
David Fixler,EYP

Moderator: Tunney Lee, MIT

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible. 

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Maritime Massachusetts: Boston Stories and Sources 16 October 2015.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Join us for this two-day workshop as we explore the maritime history of Boston. In the 18th and 19th ...

Join us for this two-day workshop as we explore the maritime history of Boston. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Boston's wharves served as literal and metaphorical connections to world beyond New England. In this hands-on program, we will examine primary sources from the Society's collections that reveal Boston's importance of the site of commercial and intellectual exchange, tour Boston's historical waterfront, and discover how the sea inspired generations of New England artists and writers.

This program is open to educators and history enthusiasts. Educators can earn 22.5 PDPs.

Dates: October 16 & 17, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 4:00pm

Fee: $35 per person

To Register / For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

  • Tour theSociety's newest exhibition Terra Firma and hear tales of doomed sea voyages
  • Explore the Society's collection of maps and logbooks and participate in a hands-on activity that will engage your detective skills.
  • Investigate nautical paintings and artifacts at the Museum of Fine Arts.
  • Visit the MIT Museum to learn more about Francis Russell Hart Nautical Collections, one of the oldest and most extensive archives of nautical technology in the United States.
  • Take a walking tour of Boston's Historical Waterfront with a Boston By Foot guide.
  • Engage in a bit of marine science as you explore the New England Aquarium.
  • This program is funded in part by the Richard E. Saltonstall Charitable Foundation.

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Exhibitionbegins The Unitarian Conscience: Letters & Publications from the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection 16 October 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM In 2008, the MHS acquired the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection from the Unitarian Society of ...

In 2008, the MHS acquired the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection from the Unitarian Society of Germantown in Philadelphia. To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the founding of the Germantown Society in 1865, the Society will display letters and publications from the collection that illustrate the engagement of eminent Unitarians and liberal religious thinkers in a wide range of 19th-century reform movements.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Maritime Massachusetts: Boston Stories and Sources 17 October 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Join us for this two-day workshop as we explore the maritime history of Boston. In the 18th and 19th ...

Join us for this two-day workshop as we explore the maritime history of Boston. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Boston's wharves served as literal and metaphorical connections to world beyond New England. In this hands-on program, we will examine primary sources from the Society's collections that reveal Boston's importance of the site of commercial and intellectual exchange, tour Boston's historical waterfront, and discover how the sea inspired generations of New England artists and writers.

This program is open to educators and history enthusiasts. Educators can earn 22.5 PDPs.

Dates: October 16 & 17, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 4:00pm

Fee: $35 per person

To Register / For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

  • Tour theSociety's newest exhibition Terra Firma and hear tales of doomed sea voyages
  • Explore the Society's collection of maps and logbooks and participate in a hands-on activity that will engage your detective skills.
  • Investigate nautical paintings and artifacts at the Museum of Fine Arts.
  • Visit the MIT Museum to learn more about Francis Russell Hart Nautical Collections, one of the oldest and most extensive archives of nautical technology in the United States.
  • Take a walking tour of Boston's Historical Waterfront with a Boston By Foot guide.
  • Engage in a bit of marine science as you explore the New England Aquarium.
  • This program is funded in part by the Richard E. Saltonstall Charitable Foundation.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 17 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation The Two Worlds of Erastus Hopkins 21 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Bruce Laurie and Anne Emerson $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members) The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical ...

The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical figure, Erastus Hopkins. Bruce Laurie’s work Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists, looks at Hopkins the public leader.  Every antebellum politician in our Commonwealth was well aware of Erastus Hopkins, a longtime representative and senator from Northampton; a founding father of the Free Soil Party; and a leading radical Republican, he was widely seen as one of the finest orators of the era and known as a principled abolitionist. Yet, until recently he was unknown to historians of the Civil War era. He was also, as Anne Emerson discovered in the archives of the MHS, an extraordinary father, writing beautiful, loving letters to his children in the 1850s and 60s. Emerson, who is Hopkins’ great-great granddaughter, has woven a very modern tale of the power and meaning of these letters in her own life.  Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace tells of the interplay of generations and values, and of the unusual ways we can use history in our lives. They will read and discuss their work together in this program.

Trained as a labor historian, Laurie is author or editor of numerous books including Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850  and Artisans into Workers, which was re-issued in 1997 and remains a core text in the field of US labor. Most of his current work is focused on the history of abolitionism, as reflected in Beyond Garrison: Anti-Slavery and Social Reform (2005) and Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists (2015). He is at work on the Civil War service of Henry S. Gere, a founder of the abolitionist movement in Northampton and longtime publisher of the Hampshire Gazette who served in the Army of the Gulf on the Louisiana Front in 1862-63. He taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1971 until 2008 and has also taught courses at Mt. Holyoke College and at the Centre for the Study of Social History at the University of Warwic. 

Anne Emerson was the executive director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard from 1988 to 1998 and after that the director of the Bostonian Society and the Old State House Museum, and the Boston Museum Project.  She is a graduate of Brown University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the Boston University Public Management Program. Emerson is married to Peter Altman, who was artistic director of the Huntington Theater for its first 18 years. She was born in Brookline and lives in Jamaica Plain with her children and grandchildren nearby.  She is also a painter and shows her work in Jamaica Plain and in Sedgwick, Maine.  She has written for the Boston Globe and Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace is her first book.

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MHS baseball artifacts 2004 Red Sox World Series Trophy Visits the MHS 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 1:00PM Join us from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM for this special event and see the 2004 Red Sox World Series Trophy ...

Join us from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM for this special event and see the 2004 Red Sox World Series Trophy alongside a one-day display featuring the Society’s 1912 Red Sox medal and other baseball artifacts from its collections. Visitors are invited to take pictures with the trophy. 

The Society's exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Explore maps from one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections in Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection and discover an unlikely yet extraordinary friendship in "Always Your Friend": Letters from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge, 1884-1918.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Immigration, Race and the Tea Party Movement 27 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Luis Jiménez, University of Massachusetts—Boston Comment: Theda Skocpol, Harvard University To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? ...

To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? Previous literature, ethnographic work and anecdotal evidence point to a complex mythology of taxpayers versus freeloaders that appears to not have any empirical basis, but rather rests on racial cues. This paper tests these hypotheses through a number of measures at different levels--state, congressional, and county units. It finds that tea party behavior was more pronounced in states, districts or counties with disproportionate numbers of Latinos, or people perceived as an immigrant other.

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Brown Bag Jeremy Belknap, Missionary: Religion, History, and the Founding of the MHS 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Abram Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis This project explores the religious beliefs of Jeremy Belknap, the founder of the MHS. His faith ...

This project explores the religious beliefs of Jeremy Belknap, the founder of the MHS. His faith inspired a theology of usefulness that aimed to civilize the country and enlarge God’s kingdom, turning initial missionary longings into eventual historical societies. This work forms a chapter in Van Engen's second book project: a history of John Winthrop’s 1630 “city on a hill” sermon, which was first recovered by the New-York Historical Society and printed by the MHS in 1838. In this chapter, Van Engen asks why these societies existed in the first place, and suggests it has a good deal to do with Native Americans, New Hampshire woodsmen, and religious belief.

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Library Closed Reading Room Closing @ 3:30PM 28 October 2015.Wednesday, all day The reading room will close at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event. The reference area and ...

The reading room will close at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event. The reference area and microfilm collections will remain accessible until 4:45PM.

If you have any questions, please contact Asst. Reference Librarian Dan Hinchen at dhinchen@masshist.org

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 2—Connecting the Communities Back to the City, 1960–1990 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Langley Keyes, Paul Chan, Ann Hershfang, and Karilyn Crockett - Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) SOLD OUT! In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the ...

SOLD OUT!

In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the neighborhoods continued to struggle. New development strategies worked to bring neighborhoods into the planning process and deals with developers helped to give some of the benefits of these projects to the impacted residents. However, the benefits of were not shared equally. Increased wealth led to higher prices in some areas while social and racial strife depressed values in others.

Panelists
Langley Keyes, MIT
Paul Chan, MHIC
Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston
Karilyn Crockett, City of Boston

Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives

 

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Special Event Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize 29 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM Join us for the announcement of the recipient of the Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize ...

Join us for the announcement of the recipient of the Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize. The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30 PM and will be followed at 6:00 PM by the presentation of the award and a talk by the author. Seating is limited. RSVP by October 22.


Peter Gomes

The Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize, for the best nonfiction work on the history of Massachusetts published during the preceding year, honors the memory of a respected Harvard scholar and beloved Fellow of the MHS. Peter J. Gomes (1942-2011) was elected to the MHS in 1976 and joined the Board of Overseers in 2010. He was the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard Divinity School and the Pusey Minister of Memorial Church. 

A proud native of Plymouth, he was also a past president of the Pilgrim Society and a member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. He specialized in Early American history, particularly the history of Massachusetts, and delighted in stimulating the minds of his students and the members of his congregation alike. Friends can still recall his rich, deep voice and laughter as he took part in MHS events, relishing the opportunity to revel in historical scholarship and support the institution with which he had such a long association.

Image: Reverend Peter J. Gomes, Fred Field/Harvard News Office

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 31 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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November
Public Program, Author Talk War of Two 2 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Sedgwick, author $20 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) SOLD OUT John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and ...

SOLD OUT

John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation explores one of the most shocking events in American political history, the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. The final confrontation between the political rivals left a Founding Father dead and the sitting Vice President a fugitive from justice.  Each man was willing to risk everything—from his personal reputation to the stability of the young country he helped form.  But—why?­ 

It’s the question Sedgwick asked himself when he started looking into the Hamilton-Burr rivalry.  While researching an earlier book about his family’s history at MHS, Sedgwick came across a remarkable letter in the society’s collection detailing his personal connection to the infamous dispute.  It was written by Alexander Hamilton, and sent to Theodore Sedgwick, John’s great-great-great-grandfather, the night before he rowed across the Hudson to the dueling ground.  It was the last letter Hamilton ever wrote.  It has been little appreciated by historians, but Sedgwick has come to believe that, more than any other single document, it describes Hamilton’s reasons for risking his own life to end Burr’s.

Sedgwick will discuss the many sources of the antagonism between the two men – all of them stemming from their radical differences in background, temperament, ideology, politics, and even their views of women.  And he will detail how all these differences collided at daybreak on July 11, 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey.

John Sedgwick is the author of several books, including the memoir In My Blood, and articles for such publications as Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Newsweek, and Esquire. He was nominated for a National Magazine Award for a story on the country's finest nonprofit organizations.

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Early American History Seminar From the Indian Ocean to the New England Frontier: Huguenot Refugees and the Geopolitics of Empire, 1682-1700 3 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Owen Stanwood, Boston College Comment: Wim Klooster, Clark University Huguenot refugees have long been stock characters in colonial American history. Fleeing persecution ...

Huguenot refugees have long been stock characters in colonial American history. Fleeing persecution in France, they scattered around the continent during the late-1600s, from New England to South Carolina. This paper, part of a larger project on the global Huguenot diaspora, places these American refugees in their proper context. Rather than simple religious migrants, the Huguenots were willing pawns in geopolitical schemes from one end of the earth to the other. In particular, they often ended up in contested imperial borderlands -- from the New England frontier to South America and the South Indian Ocean. By adopting a wider gaze we see the larger significance of the refugees, who their patrons hoped would be agents of empire around the world.

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Brown Bag China's Wartime Interpreter Program for the U.S. Army, 1941–1945 4 November 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Zach Fredman, Boston University In order to build a functioning Sino-American alliance during World War II, the Chinese ...

In order to build a functioning Sino-American alliance during World War II, the Chinese government trained more than 3,300 college students and recent graduates to serve as interpreters with U.S. forces in China. Interpreters made the alliance a reality by enabling American servicemen to communicate with other Chinese, but problems besetting the interpreter program and conflicts between GIs and interpreters intensified over the course of the war, overshadowing the program’s considerable achievements.

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Public Program, Author Talk Canceled: Jefferson and Volney's Ruins of Empire 5 November 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Thomas Christian Williams, Author $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) We regret to inform you that this event has been canceled. We apologize for any ...

We regret to inform you that this event has been canceled. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thomas Christian Williams discovered, or more accurately, rediscovered—Thomas Jefferson’s anonymous translation of Volney’s Ruins of Empires. Volney’s book was widely read in the United States during the 19th century. George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman are among the personages said to have read Volney’s Ruins. In 1923 a French researcher discovered letters between Volney and Jefferson that implied, but did not prove, Jefferson translated Ruins of Empires. Williams has discovered the Massachusetts Historical Society possesses a manuscript that proves, once and for all, Jefferson’s involvement with this controversial book and will outline the discovery in his talk.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Environmental History Seminar André Michaux and the Many Politics of Trees in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World 10 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Elizabeth Hyde, Kean University Comment: Joseph Cullon, MIT/WPI In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and ...

In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and collect North American specimens in an attempt to find trees that could replenish French forests. This essay offers a new analysis of Michaux’s mission in the context of the geo-political and diplomatic circumstances of his day. It demonstrates the importance of having botanical knowledge of a realm, and the value of a scientist who could navigate and communicate such information.

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Building Closed Veterans Day 11 November 2015.Wednesday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Biography Seminar Writing with Giants: Making the Human Larger than Life 12 November 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM John Stauffer, Harvard University Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64 Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery ...

Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery movement and the Civil War, about his upcoming biography of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, whose moral stand on slavery led to his being beaten on the Senate floor. Writing about Charles Sumner, a complicated man whose life didn’t neatly conform to expectations both in the public and the private sphere, raises all sorts of questions about the uses of biography and the biographical approach to unveil the moral dimension of social change. Stauffer is the author of over a dozen books including Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.


New England Biography Seminar series information

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Wright Brothers glider Special Event An Evening with David McCullough 13 November 2015.Friday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT This event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617 ...

This event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518 or click on the RSVP link above to submit your name online.

Join us for an evening with Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning author and MHS Fellow David McCullough. Following a reception you are invited to sit back and listen as David McCullough talks about his process, his works, and his latest book, The Wright Brothers

Tickets:
$125 per person MHS Fellows and Members
$200 per person general public

Your ticket will support the Society’s educational and outreach efforts. 

Become a Member!

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 14 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 3—The New Economy: Eds and Meds, 1980s to Today 18 November 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Anthony Pangaro, Barbara Rubel, Peter Kiang, and Kathy Spiegelman - Modereator: Kairos Shen $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), ...

Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), room 33-123. This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

Universities and hospitals have long been the bedrock of strong communities. However, in the second half of the 20th century the elite institutions also became incredible wealth generators. With research grants, pharmaceutical contracts, and bio-tech money on the table, this became a frenetically competitive market and the top institutions looked to secure their position through expansion. However, this expansion displaced residents and the new wealth brought into the city increased economic pressure on neighboring communities. The explosion of bio-technology and the innovation economy has swelled tax rolls but also created the challenge of harnessing this new wealth to benefit the entire population.

Panelists:
Anthony Pangaro, Millennium Partners
Barbara Rubel, Tufts University
Peter Kiang, UMass Boston
Kathy Spiegelman, Northeastern University

Moderated by Kairos Shen, former BRA 

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Public Program From Bunker Hill to Yorktown: Collecting maps along America's Road to Independence 20 November 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Ronald E. Grim, Curator, Leventhal Map Center, BPL Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map ...

Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map collecting in relation to Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 21 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents 21 November 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Margaret Newell Historian Margaret Newell, author of Brethren by Nature, leads a discussion of the ...

Historian Margaret Newell, author of Brethren by Nature, leads a discussion of the enslavement of Native Americans from the first years of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Starting with the Pequot War in the mid-1630s, hundreds of Native Americans were enslaved. Many were sold into slavery in the Caribbean. Others became slaves to households of the prominent, including John Winthrop. The ship Desire left for the Caribbean with Native Americans for sale – only to return the following year, 1638, with New England’s first documented African slaves.

Join us for a stimulating discussion of both primary and secondary sources on the founding of New England slavery. This is the first in a four-part series of discussions on the collision of Native American and European cultures.  Co-hosted by the Partnership of Historic Bostons and the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk Lucy Stone 23 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Sally McMillen, Davidson College $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century ...

In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century American women suffragists: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. "Historically," the inscription beneath the marble statue notes, "these three stand unique and peerless." In fact, the statue has a glaring omission: Lucy Stone. A pivotal leader in the fight for both abolition and gender equality, her achievements marked the beginning of the women's rights movement and helped to lay the groundwork for the eventual winning of women's suffrage. Sally McMillen sets out to address this significant historical oversight. Stone graduated in 1847 from the Oberlin Collegiate Institute as one of the first women in the US to earn a college degree and was immediately drawn into the public sector as an activist and orator. Lecturing on anti-slavery and women's rights, she played a critical role in the organization and leadership of the American Equal Rights Association during the Civil War, and, in 1869, cofounded the American Woman Suffrage Association.

Sally G. McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History at Davidson College. Her books include Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Motherhood in the Old South: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Infant Rearing, and To Raise Up the South.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “A barbarous practice that would not be permitted in other civilized countries”: The Evolution and Enduring Presence of the African Dodger Game at Boston-Area Amusement Venues 24 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Mark Herlihy, Endicott College Comment: Jeff Melnick, University of Massachusetts—Boston This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which ...

This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which patrons paid a nickel for a chance to throw a ball at the head of an African American male. The game’s popularity suggests the ways in which leisure venues and special events could strengthen white working- and middle-class identity and reinforce racial hierarchies.

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Building Closed Thanksgiving 26 November 2015.Thursday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 27 November 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries Open 10AM to 4PM.

Galleries Open 10AM to 4PM.

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Library Closed Thanksgiving 27 November 2015.Friday, all day The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. ...

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 28 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries open 10AM to 4PM.

Galleries open 10AM to 4PM.

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Thanksgiving 28 November 2015.Saturday, all day The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. ...

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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December
Early American History Seminar Faces, Beauty, and Brains: Physiognomy and Female Education in Post-Revolutionary America 1 December 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Rachel Walker, University of Maryland Comment: Robert A. Gross, University of Connecticut This project explores how early republican Americans used physiognomy—the “science&rdquo ...

This project explores how early republican Americans used physiognomy—the “science” of interpreting facial features—to distinguish between the minds of men and women. The work examines diaries of several “female physiognomists” who focused on evaluating the intellectual capacities of other educated women. Ultimately, the research traces how different groups of individuals used physiognomy to make sense of human nature.

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Brown Bag Liberty Ports: Sex, Crime, and Policing in World War Two America 2 December 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Hiltner, Boston University The American home front is often thought of as a mostly safe refuge from the violence and suffering ...

The American home front is often thought of as a mostly safe refuge from the violence and suffering of World War Two. Yet, the arrival of millions of soldiers and sailors brought crime, rioting, carousing, and sexual violence to American cities and ports. This project tracks interactions between American civilians and troops, the military's policing of stateside servicemen, and the transformation of American cities during wartime.

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 4—What's Next 2 December 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Barros, Marc Draisen, and Cassandra Campbell - Moderator: David Luberoff $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members) A high percentage of Boston's population move to the city as adults and many have moved here in the ...

A high percentage of Boston's population move to the city as adults and many have moved here in the last 20 years and knows very little about the city before it was an economic juggernaut. These New Bostonians are often from different parts of the world and increasingly have political and economic power in the city. What lays ahead for planners and politicians who will work with this new community? Large federal planning grants are long gone and the heyday of linkage and private/public partnerships is past, so what are the economic engines to harness in the future. What are the challenges facing planners? Has pressure on housing and open space has replaced concerns about blight in the public discourse and is climate change now a factor for planners and architects?

Panelists
John Barros, chief of economic development, City of Boston
Marc Draisen, MAPC
Cassandra Campbell, Fresh Food Generation 

Moderator David Luberoff, Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI)

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation(AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Library Closed 4 December 2015.Friday, all day Library will be closed all day, Friday, 4 December. The Exhibition Galleries will be open, 10:00AM-4 ...

Library will be closed all day, Friday, 4 December. The Exhibition Galleries will be open, 10:00AM-4:00PM. 

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Teacher Workshop Roosevelt, Lodge, and the Rush to Empire 5 December 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM Using the correspondence between Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge, this hands-on workshop ...

Using the correspondence between Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge, this hands-on workshop will explore America's role in the Spanish American War, including Roosevelt's infamous turn as a "Rough Rider." We will also use propaganda, such as political cartoons, editorials, and moving images to investigate the expansion of American interests overseas, and the war's effect on Republican Party politics at the turn of the 20th century.

Teachers can earn Professional Development Points and/or one graduate credit (for an additional tuition fee).

Date: Saturday, December 5, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Fee: $25

To Register: complete our Registration Form and mail/email it to the MHS Education Department.

For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

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Environmental History Seminar Rerouting Risk: New Orleans and the Mississippi River 8 December 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Craig E. Colten, Louisiana State University Comment: Steve Moga, Smith College New Orleans has maintained a complicated relationship with the Mississippi River, which offers both ...

New Orleans has maintained a complicated relationship with the Mississippi River, which offers both a means of commerce and the threat of flooding. A massive plan to restore coastal wetlands offers some hope for the future, but it hinges on the very type of massive engineering that created the city’s perilous situation in the first place. A review of the impacts caused by flood diversions offers a perspective on the environmental consequences of the impending transformations.

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Merrymount - Farm of John Quincy Adams 2d Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 9 December 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

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History of Women and Gender Seminar A “fine looking body of women”: Woman Suffragists Develop Their Visual Campaign 10 December 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute Comment: Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library and American National Biography Suffragists coordinated a visual campaign to promote their cause and counter caricatures that ...

Suffragists coordinated a visual campaign to promote their cause and counter caricatures that depicted them as masculine. In the 1880s, they increased their efforts to establish a positive public image of their movement. Suffrage leaders—especially Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton—began to change the way they represented themselves and fellow prominent figures. In the 1890s, as press committees took control of visual propaganda, suffragists honed their visual strategies to transform the imagery of political womanhood in the mainstream press.

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Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:30PM 11 December 2015.Friday, all day More
Public Program, Author Talk She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer 14 December 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Diane Kiesel, judge $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members) Dr. Dorothy Ferebee (1898-1980), an African American obstetrician and civil rights activist who ...

Dr. Dorothy Ferebee (1898-1980), an African American obstetrician and civil rights activist who lived and worked in Washington, DC, was a descendant of Boston's African American elite. Her family tree included journalists, lawyers, politicians, a suffragette and a judge. Through her platform as president of the powerful National Council of Negro Women and the top tier Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, Ferebee advised presidents and Congress on Civil Rights issues and advised government officials on health policy. In her day, she was a household name; but today she is all but forgotten. Diane Kiesel's biography of Ferebee will introduce her to a new generation of readers. Following the arc of Ferebee's interesting life and family, she begins with Ferebee’s grandfather who escaped slavery in Virginia by stowing away aboard a sailing ship and landing eventually in Boston. Dorothy's family returned to Virginia after the Civil War, but she came back to Boston for her education, leaving the segregated, substandard public schools of the south behind her. She attended the Girls' High School, Simmons College and Tufts Medical School, graduating in 1924 and launching an activist career that lasted until her death.

Diane Kiesel is an acting justice of the New York State Supreme Court.  She presides in the Bronx County Criminal Term where she sits in the Integrated Domestic Violence Court.  Before being appointed to the bench she spent 10 years as a prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney where she handled cases involving sex crimes, homicides, police corruption and child abuse.  She is an adjunct professor of law and author of a textbook, Domestic Violence: Law, Policy and Practice, published in 2007 by Matthew Bender/LexisNexis.  Diane holds a master's degree in public affairs journalism and before graduating from law school was a journalist in Washington, D.C. where she won the Worth Bingham Prize for distinguished investigative reporting.

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Brown Bag Mrs. Rowe’s Wharf: Female Waterfront Property Owners in Early-National Boston 16 December 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathryn Lasdow, Columbia University This presentation offers some preliminary findings on the relationship between female waterfront ...

This presentation offers some preliminary findings on the relationship between female waterfront property ownership and the rise of corporate-sponsored building projects in early-national Boston. Reconstructing the life and property holdings of Hannah Speakman Rowe, widow of merchant John Rowe, it considesr how the privatization of the city’s wharves and warehouses shaped women’s financial circumstances, as many women saw their homes, businesses, and livelihoods eclipsed by the forces of improvement. This research informs a chapter in a larger dissertation entitled “Spirit of Improvement: Construction, Conflict, and Community in Early-National Port Cities.”

This program was previously erroneously listed on December 15. We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Public Program Terra Firma: The La Perouse Atlas of a Lost Voyage 18 December 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS In 1785, the Comte de La Pérouse set sail on an ambitious Pacific voyage. The journey of ...

Terra FirmaIn 1785, the Comte de La Pérouse set sail on an ambitious Pacific voyage. The journey of discovery took the crew to far-flung sites including Easter Island, Macao, and Alaska where they documented the landscapes, people, flora and fauna. In 1788 an instalment of their observations, detailed depictions, journals and charts were sent back to France aboard a British ship they encountered in Australia. Later that year, the expedition disappeared. Almost 40 years later, the wreckage of La Pérouse’s two ships were discovered by an Irish sea captain, although there were no signs of the crew. Walk through the mystery of the ill-starred voyage with Peter Drummey. 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 19 December 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Note: Building tours may be shorter during the installation and de-installation of temporary exhibitions.


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Building Closed Christmas Eve 24 December 2015.Thursday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Building Closed Christmas 25 December 2015.Friday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 26 December 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 26 December 2015.Saturday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 28 December 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 28 December 2015.Monday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 29 December 2015.Tuesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 29 December 2015.Tuesday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 30 December 2015.Wednesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 30 December 2015.Wednesday, all day The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Building Closed New Year's Eve 31 December 2015.Thursday, all day The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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More events
Member Event, Special Event Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection Preview Reception 1 October 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Terra Firma

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a preview and reception for Terra Firma. The exhibition celebrates the beginnings of one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections. The first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in American, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont will be on view along with battle maps and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

6:00 PM: Remarks by Peter Drummey, MHS
6:30 PM: Reception and preview of the exhibition 

Become a Member today!

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Exhibition "Always Your Friend": Letters from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge, 1884-1918 2 October 2015 to 9 January 2016 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Always Your Friend

One of the Society's most interesting collections of presidential papers consists of the extensive personal correspondence of Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge. From 1884 until just before Roosevelt's death in 1919, the two friends and their spouses exchanged hundreds of letters, notes, telegrams, annotated copies of speeches, newspaper articles, and photographs. "Always Your Friend" highlights selections from this remarkable collection.

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Exhibition Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection 2 October 2015 to 9 January 2016 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Terra Firma

As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its most diverse and interesting collections. Among the maps on display are landmarks of map publishing that include the first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in America, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont, as well as maps of important battles and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

Learn more about four of the mapmakers at www.masshist.org/terrafirma.

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Teacher Workshop Canceled:
Painless: A Survival Guide to the (Dreaded) History Project
3 October 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM

Are you a teacher who dreads teaching & grading the same old history projects each year?Are you interested in immersing your students in the excitement of historical investigation? Then this workshop is for you!

Are you a student who dreads researching & writing some boring history project? Are you interested in discovering the excitement of original investigation, but unsure of how to proceed? Then this workshop is for you!

Using the broad theme of “Exploration, Encounters, and Exchange in History” as a springboard, you’ll dive in to the research process and discover how to use primary sources to uncover the nineteenth-century global adventures of Massachusetts men and women.You’ll collect evidence, analyze information, draw conclusions, assemble your findings into an historical narrative, and design a history project as a paper, website, exhibit, documentary, or performance. By applying National History Day methodologies, the “dreaded” history project is transformed into the creation of imaginative, engaging, and meaningful history experiences. Representatives from Massachusetts History Day will be on hand to share how the program works.

This program is open to students, teachers, librarians, and archivists. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points.

Date: Saturday, October 3, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Fee: $10 (Free for students and teachers accompanied by students)

To Register / For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 3 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World 5 October 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Andrea Wulf $20 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

This program is co-sponsored with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. They will be hosting Andrea Wulf on October 6 for a talk on the Brother Gardeners. Click here for more information on their program

Andrea Wulf reveals in her new book the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax–infested Siberia. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets such as Darwin, Wordsworth and Goethe but also politicians such as Jefferson. Wulf also argues that it was Humboldt’s influence that led John Muir to his ideas of preservation and that shaped Thoreau’s ‘Walden’. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in Britain. She is the author of several acclaimed books. ‘The Brother Gardeners’ won the American Horticultural Society 2010 Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2008. Her book ‘Founding Gardeners’ was on the New York Times Best Seller List. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. In 2014 she co-presented a four-part BBC TV garden series and she appears regularly on radio.

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Early American History Seminar Copley’s Cato or, The Art of Slavery in the Age of British Liberty 6 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jane Kamensky, Harvard University Comment: David L. Waldstreicher, Graduate Center, CUNY

These pages from several chapters of Kamensky’s manuscript, Copley: A Life in Color, pull at a knotty thread in Copley’s biography as it did through his world: the tangle of slavery and liberty. We follow the artist as he became, like many in his place and time, an owner of men and women. Shortly thereafter, the painter pioneered images that revolutionized the portrayal of people of African descent in Western art. Our discussion will explore the seeming contradiction between the roles bondspeople played in Copley’s American household and upon his epic British canvases.

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Brown Bag Subsistence, Society, Commerce, and Culture in the Atlantic World in the Age of Revolution 7 October 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cynthia Bouton, Texas A&M University

This book project studies staple food production, marketplace interaction, entangled trade networks, government policies, and consumer practices to understand shifting food regimes and food security issues in the international Atlantic during the era of revolutions (1770s-1820s). Case studies from Spanish-, French-, and English-language archives trace food networks carrying wheat/flour, corn, and rice around the Atlantic in a context of Atlantic-wide demographic change, imperial rivalry, intellectual ferment, and global warfare.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Capitalism, Carceral Culture, and the Domestication of Working Women in the Early American City 8 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Schlesinger Library Jen Manion, Connecticut College Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut

Ideas about race, gender, and sexuality were driving forces in the transformation of both manufacturing and punishment in the nascent years of industrial capitalism. Arrest and imprisonment was an occupational hazard for hucksters, sex workers, and tippling house operators, while the penitentiary imposed ideals of femininity defined by whiteness, domesticity, and submission on the poor working women behind its walls.

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Public Program Terra Firma: Too Big to Show 9 October 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Mary Yacovone, MHS

An up close look at atlases which didn’t make it into the exhibition. A chance to see atlases such as the Atlantic Neptune and understand how they were actually used.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 10 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program Opening Our Doors - Open House 12 October 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS MHS doors

OOD 2015Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and culturalevents. Stop by to see a special one-day display of “Doors from the MHS Collections,”including items such as Thomas Jefferson’s detail drawings of Monticello and photo studiesof the North End. Visitors can also enjoy the Society’s fall exhibitions, Terra Firma:The Beginnings of the Society’s Map Collection; and “Always Your Friend”: Letters betweenTheodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge.

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Library Closed Columbus Day 12 October 2015.Monday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.

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Environmental History Seminar How Rachel Carson Became a Revolutionary: Environmental Politics and the Public Sphere 13 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM David Hecht, Bowdoin College Comment: Chris Bosso, Northeastern University

Silent Spring is generally considered a foundational text of the modern environmental movement. However, this paper contends that Rachel Carson’s legacy is more mixed than the historical memory about her allows. This essay considers the surprisingly varied reception of Silent Spring over the last five decades. Ultimately, it argues, that assessment that Carson's work was revolutionary reflects the vicissitudes of environmental politics as much as anything intrinsic to the book itself.

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 1—Turning the City Around, 1945–1970 14 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Lizabeth Cohen, Frank Del Vecchio, Mel King, and David Fixler - Moderator: Tunney Lee $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

SOLD OUT!

At the end of WWII, Boston faced a dreary economic climate. In response to the drab financial forecast, planners and politicians began to assemble the tools necessary to chart the city’s development which led to the creation of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). The broad powers granted to the BRA created one of the most powerful planning agencies in the country. It soon became a crucible for national urban policy. Though the period was economically difficult for many—early plans displaced neighborhoods and created an organized and skeptical population—Boston became the center of some of the most creative planning and architecture in the country.

Panelists
Lizabeth Cohen, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Harvard University
Frank DelVecchio, retired attorney
Mel King, community organizer
David Fixler,EYP

Moderator: Tunney Lee, MIT

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible. 

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Maritime Massachusetts: Boston Stories and Sources 16 October 2015 to 17 October 2015

Join us for this two-day workshop as we explore the maritime history of Boston. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Boston's wharves served as literal and metaphorical connections to world beyond New England. In this hands-on program, we will examine primary sources from the Society's collections that reveal Boston's importance of the site of commercial and intellectual exchange, tour Boston's historical waterfront, and discover how the sea inspired generations of New England artists and writers.

This program is open to educators and history enthusiasts. Educators can earn 22.5 PDPs.

Dates: October 16 & 17, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 4:00pm

Fee: $35 per person

To Register / For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

Program Highlights

  • Tour theSociety's newest exhibition Terra Firma and hear tales of doomed sea voyages
  • Explore the Society's collection of maps and logbooks and participate in a hands-on activity that will engage your detective skills.
  • Investigate nautical paintings and artifacts at the Museum of Fine Arts.
  • Visit the MIT Museum to learn more about Francis Russell Hart Nautical Collections, one of the oldest and most extensive archives of nautical technology in the United States.
  • Take a walking tour of Boston's Historical Waterfront with a Boston By Foot guide.
  • Engage in a bit of marine science as you explore the New England Aquarium.
  • This program is funded in part by the Richard E. Saltonstall Charitable Foundation.

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Exhibition The Unitarian Conscience: Letters & Publications from the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection 16 October 2015 to 9 January 2016 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM

In 2008, the MHS acquired the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection from the Unitarian Society of Germantown in Philadelphia. To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the founding of the Germantown Society in 1865, the Society will display letters and publications from the collection that illustrate the engagement of eminent Unitarians and liberal religious thinkers in a wide range of 19th-century reform movements.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 17 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Conversation The Two Worlds of Erastus Hopkins 21 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Bruce Laurie and Anne Emerson $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members)

The two authors in this evening’s program are linked in their work by a common historical figure, Erastus Hopkins. Bruce Laurie’s work Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists, looks at Hopkins the public leader.  Every antebellum politician in our Commonwealth was well aware of Erastus Hopkins, a longtime representative and senator from Northampton; a founding father of the Free Soil Party; and a leading radical Republican, he was widely seen as one of the finest orators of the era and known as a principled abolitionist. Yet, until recently he was unknown to historians of the Civil War era. He was also, as Anne Emerson discovered in the archives of the MHS, an extraordinary father, writing beautiful, loving letters to his children in the 1850s and 60s. Emerson, who is Hopkins’ great-great granddaughter, has woven a very modern tale of the power and meaning of these letters in her own life.  Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace tells of the interplay of generations and values, and of the unusual ways we can use history in our lives. They will read and discuss their work together in this program.

Trained as a labor historian, Laurie is author or editor of numerous books including Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850  and Artisans into Workers, which was re-issued in 1997 and remains a core text in the field of US labor. Most of his current work is focused on the history of abolitionism, as reflected in Beyond Garrison: Anti-Slavery and Social Reform (2005) and Rebels in Paradise: Sketches of Northampton Abolitionists (2015). He is at work on the Civil War service of Henry S. Gere, a founder of the abolitionist movement in Northampton and longtime publisher of the Hampshire Gazette who served in the Army of the Gulf on the Louisiana Front in 1862-63. He taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1971 until 2008 and has also taught courses at Mt. Holyoke College and at the Centre for the Study of Social History at the University of Warwic. 

Anne Emerson was the executive director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard from 1988 to 1998 and after that the director of the Bostonian Society and the Old State House Museum, and the Boston Museum Project.  She is a graduate of Brown University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the Boston University Public Management Program. Emerson is married to Peter Altman, who was artistic director of the Huntington Theater for its first 18 years. She was born in Brookline and lives in Jamaica Plain with her children and grandchildren nearby.  She is also a painter and shows her work in Jamaica Plain and in Sedgwick, Maine.  She has written for the Boston Globe and Letters from Erastus: Field Notes on Grace is her first book.

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2004 Red Sox World Series Trophy Visits the MHS 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 1:00PM MHS baseball artifacts

Join us from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM for this special event and see the 2004 Red Sox World Series Trophy alongside a one-day display featuring the Society’s 1912 Red Sox medal and other baseball artifacts from its collections. Visitors are invited to take pictures with the trophy. 

The Society's exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Explore maps from one of the Society's most diverse and interesting collections in Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection and discover an unlikely yet extraordinary friendship in "Always Your Friend": Letters from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge, 1884-1918.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 24 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Immigration, Race and the Tea Party Movement 27 October 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Luis Jiménez, University of Massachusetts—Boston Comment: Theda Skocpol, Harvard University

To what extent has racial anxiety played a factor in the formation of the tea party movement? Previous literature, ethnographic work and anecdotal evidence point to a complex mythology of taxpayers versus freeloaders that appears to not have any empirical basis, but rather rests on racial cues. This paper tests these hypotheses through a number of measures at different levels--state, congressional, and county units. It finds that tea party behavior was more pronounced in states, districts or counties with disproportionate numbers of Latinos, or people perceived as an immigrant other.

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Brown Bag Jeremy Belknap, Missionary: Religion, History, and the Founding of the MHS 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Abram Van Engen, Washington University in St. Louis

This project explores the religious beliefs of Jeremy Belknap, the founder of the MHS. His faith inspired a theology of usefulness that aimed to civilize the country and enlarge God’s kingdom, turning initial missionary longings into eventual historical societies. This work forms a chapter in Van Engen's second book project: a history of John Winthrop’s 1630 “city on a hill” sermon, which was first recovered by the New-York Historical Society and printed by the MHS in 1838. In this chapter, Van Engen asks why these societies existed in the first place, and suggests it has a good deal to do with Native Americans, New Hampshire woodsmen, and religious belief.

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Library Closed Reading Room Closing @ 3:30PM 28 October 2015.Wednesday, all day

The reading room will close at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event. The reference area and microfilm collections will remain accessible until 4:45PM.

If you have any questions, please contact Asst. Reference Librarian Dan Hinchen at dhinchen@masshist.org

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Public Program Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 2—Connecting the Communities Back to the City, 1960–1990 28 October 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Langley Keyes, Paul Chan, Ann Hershfang, and Karilyn Crockett - Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

SOLD OUT!

In the 1970s and 1980s, business in Boston began to improve. Yet, many of the neighborhoods continued to struggle. New development strategies worked to bring neighborhoods into the planning process and deals with developers helped to give some of the benefits of these projects to the impacted residents. However, the benefits of were not shared equally. Increased wealth led to higher prices in some areas while social and racial strife depressed values in others.

Panelists
Langley Keyes, MIT
Paul Chan, MHIC
Ann Hershfang, WalkBoston
Karilyn Crockett, City of Boston

Moderator: Rep. Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives

 

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Special Event Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize 29 October 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM

Join us for the announcement of the recipient of the Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize. The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30 PM and will be followed at 6:00 PM by the presentation of the award and a talk by the author. Seating is limited. RSVP by October 22.


Peter Gomes

The Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize, for the best nonfiction work on the history of Massachusetts published during the preceding year, honors the memory of a respected Harvard scholar and beloved Fellow of the MHS. Peter J. Gomes (1942-2011) was elected to the MHS in 1976 and joined the Board of Overseers in 2010. He was the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard Divinity School and the Pusey Minister of Memorial Church. 

A proud native of Plymouth, he was also a past president of the Pilgrim Society and a member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. He specialized in Early American history, particularly the history of Massachusetts, and delighted in stimulating the minds of his students and the members of his congregation alike. Friends can still recall his rich, deep voice and laughter as he took part in MHS events, relishing the opportunity to revel in historical scholarship and support the institution with which he had such a long association.

Image: Reverend Peter J. Gomes, Fred Field/Harvard News Office

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 31 October 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk War of Two 2 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Sedgwick, author $20 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

SOLD OUT

John Sedgwick’s WAR OF TWO: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation explores one of the most shocking events in American political history, the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. The final confrontation between the political rivals left a Founding Father dead and the sitting Vice President a fugitive from justice.  Each man was willing to risk everything—from his personal reputation to the stability of the young country he helped form.  But—why?­ 

It’s the question Sedgwick asked himself when he started looking into the Hamilton-Burr rivalry.  While researching an earlier book about his family’s history at MHS, Sedgwick came across a remarkable letter in the society’s collection detailing his personal connection to the infamous dispute.  It was written by Alexander Hamilton, and sent to Theodore Sedgwick, John’s great-great-great-grandfather, the night before he rowed across the Hudson to the dueling ground.  It was the last letter Hamilton ever wrote.  It has been little appreciated by historians, but Sedgwick has come to believe that, more than any other single document, it describes Hamilton’s reasons for risking his own life to end Burr’s.

Sedgwick will discuss the many sources of the antagonism between the two men – all of them stemming from their radical differences in background, temperament, ideology, politics, and even their views of women.  And he will detail how all these differences collided at daybreak on July 11, 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey.

John Sedgwick is the author of several books, including the memoir In My Blood, and articles for such publications as Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Newsweek, and Esquire. He was nominated for a National Magazine Award for a story on the country's finest nonprofit organizations.

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Early American History Seminar From the Indian Ocean to the New England Frontier: Huguenot Refugees and the Geopolitics of Empire, 1682-1700 3 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Owen Stanwood, Boston College Comment: Wim Klooster, Clark University

Huguenot refugees have long been stock characters in colonial American history. Fleeing persecution in France, they scattered around the continent during the late-1600s, from New England to South Carolina. This paper, part of a larger project on the global Huguenot diaspora, places these American refugees in their proper context. Rather than simple religious migrants, the Huguenots were willing pawns in geopolitical schemes from one end of the earth to the other. In particular, they often ended up in contested imperial borderlands -- from the New England frontier to South America and the South Indian Ocean. By adopting a wider gaze we see the larger significance of the refugees, who their patrons hoped would be agents of empire around the world.

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Brown Bag China's Wartime Interpreter Program for the U.S. Army, 1941–1945 4 November 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Zach Fredman, Boston University

In order to build a functioning Sino-American alliance during World War II, the Chinese government trained more than 3,300 college students and recent graduates to serve as interpreters with U.S. forces in China. Interpreters made the alliance a reality by enabling American servicemen to communicate with other Chinese, but problems besetting the interpreter program and conflicts between GIs and interpreters intensified over the course of the war, overshadowing the program’s considerable achievements.

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Public Program, Author Talk Canceled:
Jefferson and Volney's Ruins of Empire
5 November 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Thomas Christian Williams, Author $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

We regret to inform you that this event has been canceled. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thomas Christian Williams discovered, or more accurately, rediscovered—Thomas Jefferson’s anonymous translation of Volney’s Ruins of Empires. Volney’s book was widely read in the United States during the 19th century. George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman are among the personages said to have read Volney’s Ruins. In 1923 a French researcher discovered letters between Volney and Jefferson that implied, but did not prove, Jefferson translated Ruins of Empires. Williams has discovered the Massachusetts Historical Society possesses a manuscript that proves, once and for all, Jefferson’s involvement with this controversial book and will outline the discovery in his talk.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 orabentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Environmental History Seminar André Michaux and the Many Politics of Trees in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World 10 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Elizabeth Hyde, Kean University Comment: Joseph Cullon, MIT/WPI

In 1785, French botanist André Michaux was dispatched to the United States to study and collect North American specimens in an attempt to find trees that could replenish French forests. This essay offers a new analysis of Michaux’s mission in the context of the geo-political and diplomatic circumstances of his day. It demonstrates the importance of having botanical knowledge of a realm, and the value of a scientist who could navigate and communicate such information.

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Building Closed Veterans Day 11 November 2015.Wednesday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Biography Seminar Writing with Giants: Making the Human Larger than Life 12 November 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM John Stauffer, Harvard University Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64

Civil War biographer Carol Bundy talks with John Stauffer, a leading historian of the antislavery movement and the Civil War, about his upcoming biography of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, whose moral stand on slavery led to his being beaten on the Senate floor. Writing about Charles Sumner, a complicated man whose life didn’t neatly conform to expectations both in the public and the private sphere, raises all sorts of questions about the uses of biography and the biographical approach to unveil the moral dimension of social change. Stauffer is the author of over a dozen books including Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.


New England Biography Seminar series information

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Special Event An Evening with David McCullough 13 November 2015.Friday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT Wright Brothers glider

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

This event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518 or click on the RSVP link above to submit your name online.

Join us for an evening with Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning author and MHS Fellow David McCullough. Following a reception you are invited to sit back and listen as David McCullough talks about his process, his works, and his latest book, The Wright Brothers

Tickets:
$125 per person MHS Fellows and Members
$200 per person general public

Your ticket will support the Society’s educational and outreach efforts. 

Become a Member!

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 14 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 3—The New Economy: Eds and Meds, 1980s to Today 18 November 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Anthony Pangaro, Barbara Rubel, Peter Kiang, and Kathy Spiegelman - Modereator: Kairos Shen $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

Note: This program will take place at the MIT Stata Center (Vassar Street near Main), room 33-123. This is a four minute walk from the Kendall Square MBTA station or there is a parking garage at the Marriot Hotel in Kendall Square. 

Universities and hospitals have long been the bedrock of strong communities. However, in the second half of the 20th century the elite institutions also became incredible wealth generators. With research grants, pharmaceutical contracts, and bio-tech money on the table, this became a frenetically competitive market and the top institutions looked to secure their position through expansion. However, this expansion displaced residents and the new wealth brought into the city increased economic pressure on neighboring communities. The explosion of bio-technology and the innovation economy has swelled tax rolls but also created the challenge of harnessing this new wealth to benefit the entire population.

Panelists:
Anthony Pangaro, Millennium Partners
Barbara Rubel, Tufts University
Peter Kiang, UMass Boston
Kathy Spiegelman, Northeastern University

Moderated by Kairos Shen, former BRA 

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Public Program From Bunker Hill to Yorktown: Collecting maps along America's Road to Independence 20 November 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Ronald E. Grim, Curator, Leventhal Map Center, BPL

Ronald Grim, Curator of Maps at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, will discuss the history of map collecting in relation to Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 21 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Public Program Begin at the Beginning: Boston’s Founding Documents 21 November 2015.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Margaret Newell

Historian Margaret Newell, author of Brethren by Nature, leads a discussion of the enslavement of Native Americans from the first years of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Starting with the Pequot War in the mid-1630s, hundreds of Native Americans were enslaved. Many were sold into slavery in the Caribbean. Others became slaves to households of the prominent, including John Winthrop. The ship Desire left for the Caribbean with Native Americans for sale – only to return the following year, 1638, with New England’s first documented African slaves.

Join us for a stimulating discussion of both primary and secondary sources on the founding of New England slavery. This is the first in a four-part series of discussions on the collision of Native American and European cultures.  Co-hosted by the Partnership of Historic Bostons and the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

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Public Program, Author Talk Lucy Stone 23 November 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Sally McMillen, Davidson College $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

In the rotunda of the nation's Capital a statue pays homage to three famous nineteenth-century American women suffragists: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. "Historically," the inscription beneath the marble statue notes, "these three stand unique and peerless." In fact, the statue has a glaring omission: Lucy Stone. A pivotal leader in the fight for both abolition and gender equality, her achievements marked the beginning of the women's rights movement and helped to lay the groundwork for the eventual winning of women's suffrage. Sally McMillen sets out to address this significant historical oversight. Stone graduated in 1847 from the Oberlin Collegiate Institute as one of the first women in the US to earn a college degree and was immediately drawn into the public sector as an activist and orator. Lecturing on anti-slavery and women's rights, she played a critical role in the organization and leadership of the American Equal Rights Association during the Civil War, and, in 1869, cofounded the American Woman Suffrage Association.

Sally G. McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History at Davidson College. Her books include Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Motherhood in the Old South: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Infant Rearing, and To Raise Up the South.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “A barbarous practice that would not be permitted in other civilized countries”: The Evolution and Enduring Presence of the African Dodger Game at Boston-Area Amusement Venues 24 November 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Mark Herlihy, Endicott College Comment: Jeff Melnick, University of Massachusetts—Boston

This paper traces the rise and enduring presence of the notorious African Dodger game, in which patrons paid a nickel for a chance to throw a ball at the head of an African American male. The game’s popularity suggests the ways in which leisure venues and special events could strengthen white working- and middle-class identity and reinforce racial hierarchies.

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Building Closed Thanksgiving 26 November 2015.Thursday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 27 November 2015.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries Open 10AM to 4PM.

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Library Closed Thanksgiving 27 November 2015.Friday, all day

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 28 November 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries open 10AM to 4PM.

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Thanksgiving 28 November 2015.Saturday, all day

The MHS library will be closed all day.  The Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  

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Early American History Seminar Faces, Beauty, and Brains: Physiognomy and Female Education in Post-Revolutionary America 1 December 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Rachel Walker, University of Maryland Comment: Robert A. Gross, University of Connecticut

This project explores how early republican Americans used physiognomy—the “science” of interpreting facial features—to distinguish between the minds of men and women. The work examines diaries of several “female physiognomists” who focused on evaluating the intellectual capacities of other educated women. Ultimately, the research traces how different groups of individuals used physiognomy to make sense of human nature.

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Brown Bag Liberty Ports: Sex, Crime, and Policing in World War Two America 2 December 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Hiltner, Boston University

The American home front is often thought of as a mostly safe refuge from the violence and suffering of World War Two. Yet, the arrival of millions of soldiers and sailors brought crime, rioting, carousing, and sexual violence to American cities and ports. This project tracks interactions between American civilians and troops, the military's policing of stateside servicemen, and the transformation of American cities during wartime.

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Public Program, Conversation Transforming Boston: From Basket Case to Innovation Hub Program 4—What's Next 2 December 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM John Barros, Marc Draisen, and Cassandra Campbell - Moderator: David Luberoff $10 fee (no charge for MHS, BARI, or Rappaport Fellows or Members)

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

A high percentage of Boston's population move to the city as adults and many have moved here in the last 20 years and knows very little about the city before it was an economic juggernaut. These New Bostonians are often from different parts of the world and increasingly have political and economic power in the city. What lays ahead for planners and politicians who will work with this new community? Large federal planning grants are long gone and the heyday of linkage and private/public partnerships is past, so what are the economic engines to harness in the future. What are the challenges facing planners? Has pressure on housing and open space has replaced concerns about blight in the public discourse and is climate change now a factor for planners and architects?

Panelists
John Barros, chief of economic development, City of Boston
Marc Draisen, MAPC
Cassandra Campbell, Fresh Food Generation 

Moderator David Luberoff, Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI)

We are grateful to our underwriter The Architectural Heritage Foundation(AHF) and our contributors The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Boston Area Research Initiative BARI) for helping to make these programs possible.

  • The Architectural Heritage Foundation is thrilled to be invited to contribute to MHS’s efforts to understand this critical period of transformation in Boston’s recent past and in particular is providing this support in acknowledgment of the efforts and commitment of its founder, Roger Webb, to the great city of Boston and to helping to turn it around by helping to preserve and save some of the City's most enduring architectural icons.

Non-Profit Partners: 
Boston Architectural College
Architectural Studies Program of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Boston University
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
University of Massachusetts Boston

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Library Closed, Galleries Open Library Closed 4 December 2015.Friday, all day

Library will be closed all day, Friday, 4 December. The Exhibition Galleries will be open, 10:00AM-4:00PM. 

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Teacher Workshop Roosevelt, Lodge, and the Rush to Empire 5 December 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM

Using the correspondence between Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge, this hands-on workshop will explore America's role in the Spanish American War, including Roosevelt's infamous turn as a "Rough Rider." We will also use propaganda, such as political cartoons, editorials, and moving images to investigate the expansion of American interests overseas, and the war's effect on Republican Party politics at the turn of the 20th century.

Teachers can earn Professional Development Points and/or one graduate credit (for an additional tuition fee).

Date: Saturday, December 5, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Fee: $25

To Register: complete our Registration Form and mail/email it to the MHS Education Department.

For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

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Environmental History Seminar Rerouting Risk: New Orleans and the Mississippi River 8 December 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Craig E. Colten, Louisiana State University Comment: Steve Moga, Smith College

New Orleans has maintained a complicated relationship with the Mississippi River, which offers both a means of commerce and the threat of flooding. A massive plan to restore coastal wetlands offers some hope for the future, but it hinges on the very type of massive engineering that created the city’s perilous situation in the first place. A review of the impacts caused by flood diversions offers a perspective on the environmental consequences of the impending transformations.

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Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 9 December 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Merrymount - Farm of John Quincy Adams 2d

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

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History of Women and Gender Seminar A “fine looking body of women”: Woman Suffragists Develop Their Visual Campaign 10 December 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute Comment: Susan Ware, Schlesinger Library and American National Biography

Suffragists coordinated a visual campaign to promote their cause and counter caricatures that depicted them as masculine. In the 1880s, they increased their efforts to establish a positive public image of their movement. Suffrage leaders—especially Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton—began to change the way they represented themselves and fellow prominent figures. In the 1890s, as press committees took control of visual propaganda, suffragists honed their visual strategies to transform the imagery of political womanhood in the mainstream press.

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Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:30PM 11 December 2015.Friday, all day close
Public Program, Author Talk She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer 14 December 2015.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Diane Kiesel, judge $10 fee (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members)

Dr. Dorothy Ferebee (1898-1980), an African American obstetrician and civil rights activist who lived and worked in Washington, DC, was a descendant of Boston's African American elite. Her family tree included journalists, lawyers, politicians, a suffragette and a judge. Through her platform as president of the powerful National Council of Negro Women and the top tier Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, Ferebee advised presidents and Congress on Civil Rights issues and advised government officials on health policy. In her day, she was a household name; but today she is all but forgotten. Diane Kiesel's biography of Ferebee will introduce her to a new generation of readers. Following the arc of Ferebee's interesting life and family, she begins with Ferebee’s grandfather who escaped slavery in Virginia by stowing away aboard a sailing ship and landing eventually in Boston. Dorothy's family returned to Virginia after the Civil War, but she came back to Boston for her education, leaving the segregated, substandard public schools of the south behind her. She attended the Girls' High School, Simmons College and Tufts Medical School, graduating in 1924 and launching an activist career that lasted until her death.

Diane Kiesel is an acting justice of the New York State Supreme Court.  She presides in the Bronx County Criminal Term where she sits in the Integrated Domestic Violence Court.  Before being appointed to the bench she spent 10 years as a prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney where she handled cases involving sex crimes, homicides, police corruption and child abuse.  She is an adjunct professor of law and author of a textbook, Domestic Violence: Law, Policy and Practice, published in 2007 by Matthew Bender/LexisNexis.  Diane holds a master's degree in public affairs journalism and before graduating from law school was a journalist in Washington, D.C. where she won the Worth Bingham Prize for distinguished investigative reporting.

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Brown Bag Mrs. Rowe’s Wharf: Female Waterfront Property Owners in Early-National Boston 16 December 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathryn Lasdow, Columbia University

This presentation offers some preliminary findings on the relationship between female waterfront property ownership and the rise of corporate-sponsored building projects in early-national Boston. Reconstructing the life and property holdings of Hannah Speakman Rowe, widow of merchant John Rowe, it considesr how the privatization of the city’s wharves and warehouses shaped women’s financial circumstances, as many women saw their homes, businesses, and livelihoods eclipsed by the forces of improvement. This research informs a chapter in a larger dissertation entitled “Spirit of Improvement: Construction, Conflict, and Community in Early-National Port Cities.”

This program was previously erroneously listed on December 15. We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Public Program Terra Firma: The La Perouse Atlas of a Lost Voyage 18 December 2015.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, MHS

Terra FirmaIn 1785, the Comte de La Pérouse set sail on an ambitious Pacific voyage. The journey of discovery took the crew to far-flung sites including Easter Island, Macao, and Alaska where they documented the landscapes, people, flora and fauna. In 1788 an instalment of their observations, detailed depictions, journals and charts were sent back to France aboard a British ship they encountered in Australia. Later that year, the expedition disappeared. Almost 40 years later, the wreckage of La Pérouse’s two ships were discovered by an Irish sea captain, although there were no signs of the crew. Walk through the mystery of the ill-starred voyage with Peter Drummey. 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 19 December 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Terra Firma” which explores the early map collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Note: Building tours may be shorter during the installation and de-installation of temporary exhibitions.


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Building Closed Christmas Eve 24 December 2015.Thursday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Building Closed Christmas 25 December 2015.Friday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 26 December 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 26 December 2015.Saturday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 28 December 2015.Monday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 28 December 2015.Monday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 29 December 2015.Tuesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 29 December 2015.Tuesday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Holiday Hours Galleries Open 30 December 2015.Wednesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM

Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Library Closed Library Closed 30 December 2015.Wednesday, all day

The MHS Library will be closed all day.  Galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

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Building Closed New Year's Eve 31 December 2015.Thursday, all day

The MHS Library and Galleries will be closed all day.

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