The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar focuses on the study of "modern" America from its inception in the nineteenth century to the opening decades of the twenty-first century. This wide chronological expanse offers scholars an opportunity to delve into key issues in American society, such as race, ethnicity, and global migration, as well as the role of the suburbs, the exurbs, and the importance of nationhood, citizenship, identifications, and more. The seminars examine what constitutes a society or culture and what divides it, from the Civil Rights era to the Gilded Age to the cyberworld.

 

Most seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a pre-circulated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. Each session is followed by a reception with light refreshments.

 

Attendance is free and open to everyone. Subscribers who remit $25 for the year will receive early online access to any pre-circulated materials. Subscriptions also underwrite the cost of the series. Pre-circulated materials will be available to non-subscribers who have RSVP’d for a session on the day prior to the program. Subscribe to this seminar series and you will receive access to the seminar papers for SIX series: the Boston Seminar on African American History, the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on Environmental History, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, and our new Seminar on Digital History. We recognize that topics frequently resonate across these four fields; now, mix and match the seminars that you attend!

 

Join the mailing list today by emailing seminars@masshist.org.

 

Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship. Subscribe

August 2020
Brown Bag, Online Event Environmental Book History and the Reception of The Limits to Growth 6 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cheryl Knott, University of Arizona REGISTER HERE   In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a ...
 
In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a worldwide debate by asserting that continued overuse of the earth’s resources would likely lead to environmental and economic collapse. Environmental scientists, policy makers, and economists have critiqued the authors’ assumptions and methods; from the book historian’s perspective, their work constitutes one form  of reception. In this talk, Knott explores how bibliometric methods can be used to uncover additional aspects of the reception of Limits.
 
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Brown Bag, Online Event Making Home: Wabanaki and English Claims to Place, 1600-1830 13 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Joseph Hall, Bates College REGISTER HERE   At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Wabanakis ...

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At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Wabanakis defined their claims to territory in terms of networks among places. English colonists redefined the region with property defined as polygons on the landscape. Understanding how both groups constructed ideas of property and homeland can help explain how colonists erased Indigenous residents in what became western Maine. It also shows how Wabanakis retained ties to the region.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/OCHM_LOGO_Horizontal.jpg Public Program, Online Event Virtual Tour of the Old Colony History Museum 14 August 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Bronson Michaud, Curator of Collections and Katie MacDonald, Director OCHM REGISTER HERE Join us for a virtual tour of the Old Colony History Museum in ...

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Join us for a virtual tour of the Old Colony History Museum in Taunton, Massachusetts. It’s parent organization, the Old Colony Historical Society, was founded on May 4, 1853, making it one of New England’s oldest historical societies. The Museum's collections chronicle lives lived, wars waged, fortunes won and ingenuity rewarded. One of the most dynamic local historical societies in Massachusetts, OCHM hosts rotating exhibitions; a lively series of programs for both adults and children; and a research library specializing in local history and genealogy.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event Interpreting Neutrality during the American Revolution in the Northeast Borderlands 20 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Darcy Stevens, University of Maine REGISTER HERE Rebellion, neutrality and loyalty existed on a spectrum that ...

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Rebellion, neutrality and loyalty existed on a spectrum that inhabitants in the Borderlands of Maine and Nova Scotia moved along throughout the war. Likewise, British and American officials’ interpretations and acceptance of neutrality was malleable. Examining neutrals, rebels, loyalists, New England Planters, Wabanaki, and Acadians in the Borderlands reveals factors which impacted personal decisions and official policy about neutrality. Recognizing the complexity of neutrality restores agency to individuals and suggests a new terrain for assessing revolutionary actors as they were buffeted by wartime change.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Running toward Abolition: Fugitive Slaves, Legal Rights, and the Coming of the Civil War 27 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Turiano, CUNY REGISTER HERE   This talk tells the story of the long political fight over ...
 
This talk tells the story of the long political fight over the legal rights of accused fugitive slaves in the United States. That conflict—fought as often in Congress as before local judges—revealed fundamental weaknesses in the Constitution’s ability to keep peace in a half-slave, half-free nation. Abolitionists saw this opportunity and thrust the fight into electoral politics. It was central to the long- and short-term origins of the American Civil War.
 
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September 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/service-pnp-ppmsca-67900-67923v.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Standing Up, Stepping Forward, and Speaking Out: The Political Courage to take a Principled Stand 9 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online event John Dean, William Weld, and Edward Widmer Watergate was a sea change in American politics.  But even as a presidential scandal gripped ...

Watergate was a sea change in American politics.  But even as a presidential scandal gripped the nation, there were remarkable displays of political courage, as Republicans and Democrats found ways to work together for the good of the nation, and wrote new rules to ensure transparency and integrity. What can we learn from Watergate? Specifically, what can we learn from the people who stood up, stepped forward and spoke out against wrongs that they saw within their own party and among their friends? How can this help us understand the role of collaborationists in the past and today and the need for political courage. Join us for a conversation between John Dean, former White House Counsel to President Richard Nixon who was implicated in the Watergate scandal but later testified against Nixon; William Weld, former Massachusetts Governor and US presidential candidate, who began his legal career as a counsel on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's impeachment inquiry staff for the impeachment process against Richard Nixon in 1974; and historian Edward Widmer.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

Image: Leffler, Warren K, photographer. House Banking Committee hearing on Watergate Incident / WKL. Washington D.C, 1972. [10/12/72 12 Oct] Photograph (www.loc.gov/item/2020631032/).

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event John Adams and China: Globalizing Early America 10 September 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Yiyun Huang, The University of Tennessee-Knoxville John Adams consumed a lot of Chinese tea. He especially appreciated the medical benefits associated ...

John Adams consumed a lot of Chinese tea. He especially appreciated the medical benefits associated with the hot beverage. In a 1757 diary entry, he wrote that "nothing but large potions of tea" could extinguish his heartburn. How did Adams know that Chinese tea cured heartburn?  Why did he believe that nothing else was as effective? This talk examines the ways medical ideas transferred across the world during the eighteenth century.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/1942_Williams_Ted_WWII_104.jpg Public Program, Conversation, Online Event The Boston Red Sox and WWII 14 September 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by Gorden Edes, Historian of the Boston Red Sox, with authors Bill Nowlin, Anne Keene and Michael Connelly Image courtesy of the Boston Red Sox In this 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, join ...

Image courtesy of the Boston Red Sox

In this 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, join Boston Red Sox historian Gordon Edes and a panel of distinguished authors to discuss the role of Major League Baseball players from Boston in the conduct of that historic conflict. The story touches upon Ted Williams, a Naval flight instructor who would later fly combat missions for the Marines in the Korean War, but also tells of compelling acts of sacrifice and bravery performed by other big-leaguers from Boston, including Si Rosenthal and Earl Johnson of the Red Sox and Warren Spahn of the Braves.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionbegins Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 15 September 2020.Tuesday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for ...

Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/2013-Seven-Times-Salt-MSP-5082_-_Copy.jpg Public Program, Online Event Pilgrims' Progress: Music of the Plimoth Colony Settlers 1590-1645 16 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Burciaga, Dan Meyers, and Matthew Wright of Seven Times Salt The Plimoth colonists were a diverse group of Separatists and Anglicans, English and Dutch, some ...

The Plimoth colonists were a diverse group of Separatists and Anglicans, English and Dutch, some religious and some not! They brought with them varied music experiences, and Plimoth Colony heard not only psalms but also catches, ballads, and dance tunes. We'll follow the settlers from England to religious refuge in the Netherlands and onward to the early years of Plimoth. You'll hear music of the Elizabethan tavern and theater, spirited drinking songs, Dutch love songs, psalms from Sternhold & Hopkins’ Whole Booke of Psalmes, and traditional English country dance tunes.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/MHS067-evening.jpg Online Event Graduate Student Reception 17 September 2020.Thursday, 3:30PM - 4:30PM Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please join us at our eleventh annual Graduate Student ...

Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please join us at our eleventh annual Graduate Student Reception for students in history, American Studies, and related fields. This year we invite you to join a virtual gathering to learn about the resources the MHS offers to support your scholarship, from research fellowships to our seminar series.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_Nichter_jacket.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and the Making of the Cold War 21 September 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Luke A. Nichter, Texas A&M University-Central Texas A key figure in American foreign policy for three decades, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts, a ...

A key figure in American foreign policy for three decades, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts, a well-heeled Eastern Establishment Republican, put duty over partisanship to serve as advisor to five presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to Gerald Ford and as United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Vietnam, West Germany, and the Vatican. Historian Luke A. Nichter gives us a compelling narrative of Lodge’s extraordinary and consequential life and his immense political influence.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event “The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies” 22 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lauren Duval, University of Oklahoma Comment: Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American ...

The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American homes and the wartime violence within them—particularly directed against women—were prominent subjects in novels and historical paintings. Reimagining women’s interactions with British soldiers solely as relationships of violence and deception, not volition, these narratives promoted a gendered vision of wartime domestic invasion and violation that would, in memory, come to define the war’s devastation and contribute to emergent ideas about the meaning of independence.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/daniel_chester_french_cropped.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French 23 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Harold Holzer, Hunter College Daniel Chester French is America's best-known sculptor of public monuments, having created the ...

Daniel Chester French is America's best-known sculptor of public monuments, having created the statue for the Lincoln Memorial, the John Harvard statue, and The Minute Man in Concord. This new biography combines rich personal details from French's life with a nuanced study of his artistic evolution. It explores French’s diligent dedication to perfecting his craft with beautiful archival photographs of his life and work.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event “We Have Always Regarded the Question of Slavery, as Really and Essentially That of Labor”: The Intersection of Race, Class, and Slavery in Radical Antebellum Boston 24 September 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Sean Griffin, CUNY In the years before the Civil War, Boston was at the forefront of numerous American radical and ...

In the years before the Civil War, Boston was at the forefront of numerous American radical and reform movements. At the same time, the city was also a site of contestation over which reforms should take priority. Although these tensions could at times grow heated, this talk examines the ways that the relationship between the abolitionist and the early labor (or “social reform”) movements in Boston was marked by conversation and cooperation as much as competition, revealing an overlap of personnel and ideas that in many ways grew stronger as the country headed towards an irrepressible conflict over slavery.”  

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event "No unseated crowd is liable to be orderly" : Organizing Audiences around Spectacle in the Industrial Era 29 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Scott Kushner, University of Rhode Island Comment: Derek Miller, Harvard University Crowd control technologies—turnstiles, bleachers, stanchions, and seats—channel bodies ...

Crowd control technologies—turnstiles, bleachers, stanchions, and seats—channel bodies through the spaces of cultural performance: theater, music, and sport. The increasing rationalization and standardization of crowd control in the early 20th century corresponds with a critical and popular understanding of crowds as dangerous and destabilizing. This paper mines archival evidence to show how industrial-age crowd control was framed as technology that ordered masses (into lines or rows), thereby rendering masses orderly (cooperative, docile, and non-threatening).

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionbegins Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons 30 September 2020.Wednesday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His ...

Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/stewart-ravitch.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Will Public Education Survive?: A Look at the Threats to Education Systems from Privatization and Religious Nationalism 30 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Katherine Stewart and Diane Ravitch, New York University The rise of the Religious Right has coincided with the privatization movement in public schools. ...

The rise of the Religious Right has coincided with the privatization movement in public schools. While some may feel that this is coincidental, there is reason to believe there is a directly causal relationship between these two factors. Two scholars, from different disciplines, will discuss how their work comes together to help explain the history and current state of efforts to diminish, if not dismantle, the American public education system. Katherine Stewart has written on the rise and increasing power of the Religious Right in her book The Power Worshipers. She will be joined by Diane Ravitch who has written extensively on education and, in her recent book Slaying Goliath, explores the history of the school privatization movement and the efforts to oppose it.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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October 2020
Brown Bag, Online Event Rule Britannia: Imperial Patriots and the Siege of Louisbourg of 1745 1 October 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Amy Watson, University of Southern California In 1745, a group of New England volunteers who called themselves Patriots launched an expedition ...

In 1745, a group of New England volunteers who called themselves Patriots launched an expedition against the French fortress of Louisbourg, in present-day Nova Scotia. Who were these “Patriots”? What did they want with Louisbourg? And what can this incident tell us about British imperial politics in the mid-eighteenth century? This expedition reveals that the British Empire was dividing on sharp partisan lines in the 1740s, laying the groundwork for the revolutionary decades to come.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_tom_nast.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Political Cartooning 1 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Paul Szep and William Martin Paul Szep, a two-time Pulitzer Prize and Thomas Nast Prize winning editorial cartoonist and New York ...

Paul Szep, a two-time Pulitzer Prize and Thomas Nast Prize winning editorial cartoonist and New York Times best-selling author William Martin will discuss their careers. They will focus on Szep’s time as the Chief Editorial Cartoonist at The Boston Globe from 1967 – 2001 and a look at how the field of political cartoons has changed. Szep has been described as a pioneering cartoonist with “scathing wit and a drawing style that turns editorial cartoons into pieces of art.” Martin has written eleven novels, many of which are set in and around Boston and has been recognized with the New England Book Award and the Samuel Eliot Morrison Award.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 6 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have ...

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery.  By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy.  Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.”  This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.  

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Postponed: Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity 7 October 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This program has been postponed. The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an ...

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Queer Institutions – A Panel Discussion 8 October 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Marc Stein, San Francisco State University; Ashley Ruderman-Looff, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Comment: Aaron S. Lecklider, UMass Boston This panel discussion considers the queer histories of two modern institutions: colleges and prisons ...

This panel discussion considers the queer histories of two modern institutions: colleges and prisons. Marc Stein explores how activists at more than twenty colleges went to court in the 1970s to challenge their institutions’ refusal to recognize LGBT student groups. Stein’s paper analyzes these cases and situates the successful litigation at Virginia Commonwealth University in relation to contemporaneous Virginia rulings that upheld the criminalization of same-sex sodomy and the prosecution of an interracial threesome. Ashley Ruderman-Looff’s essay considers the Lavender Scare's impact on women's prison reform. Her essay tells the story of Dr. Miriam Van Waters, a superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women who was dismissed from her post in 1949. This paper analyzes Van Waters’ subversive use of the Rorschach inkblot test, allowing her to eschew homosexual diagnosis and include queer women in the reformatory’s rehabilitative programs.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Public Program, Tour, Online Event Tour of Boston Monuments 9 October 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program Eleanor Citron In recent history, the question of what to do with monuments--particularly those of ...

In recent history, the question of what to do with monuments--particularly those of Confederate origins--has become a source of contentious debate. The City of Boston only possessed one such monument on Georges Island, however, it was removed in 2017. Does this mean that Boston no longer possesses any problematic statues? In the words of Boston Globe journalist Ty Burr, “Are Boston’s statues honoring all the right men?” And, who gets to decide?

Join Eleanor Citron, MHS’s summer intern, for a virtual tour of Metro Boston’s monuments--from those championed by the city, to those beheaded or uprooted, and things in between.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg Conference, Online Event Conference Session 1 of 5: Biographies of Suffrage Champions 12 October 2020.Monday, 2:00PM - 4:00PM This is an online program Ellen DuBois, University of California Los Angeles; Thomas Dublin, SUNY Binghamton; N. Lynn Eckhert, Partners Healthcare International Comment: Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut Join us for the opening session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall ...

Join us for the opening session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications." MHS President Catherine Allgor will give opening remarks at 2:00pm

The first of five conference sessions, "Biographies of Suffrage Champions" will begin at 2:30pm. This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Ellen DuBois's “Frederick Douglass & Elizabeth Cady Stanton,” Thomas Dublin's “The Changing Shape of the Black Women Suffrage Movement, 1870-1920," and N. Lynn Eckhert's “The Role of African American and Women Physicians in Voting Rights in America.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg Conference, Online Event Conference Session 2 of 5: Marriage and the Amendments 13 October 2020.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:40PM This is an online program Helene Quanquin, University of Lille; Carol Faulkner, Syracuse University; Jessica Derleth, SUNY Binghamton Comment: Kathi Kern, University of Kentucky This is the second session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be ...

This is the second session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Helene Quanquin's “Troubling Marriage: Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster and the Fifteenth Amendment,” Carol Faulkner's “Suffrage and the Specter of Interracial Marriage,” and Jessica Derleth's “Marital Unity Through the Franchise: Suffragists’ Manipulation of Gender and Marriage Norms.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Peoples_guide_to_boston.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event A People’s Guide to Greater Boston 13 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joseph Nevins, Vassar College; Suren Moodliar, Eleni Macrakis A People's Guide to Greater Boston reveals the region’s richness and vibrancy in ways ...

A People's Guide to Greater Boston reveals the region’s richness and vibrancy in ways that are neglected by traditional area guidebooks and obscured by many tourist destinations. It highlights tales of the places and people involved in movements to abolish slavery; to end war and militarism; to achieve Native sovereignty, racial equity, gender justice, and sexual liberation; and to secure workers’ rights. This one-of-a-kind guide points the way to a radically democratic Greater Boston, one that sparks social and environmental justice and inclusivity for all.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg Conference, Online Event Conference Session 3 of 5: The Federal Government and Voting Rights in States and Across the Empire 14 October 2020.Wednesday, 2:00PM - 3:40PM This is an online program Silvana R. Siddali, Saint Louis University; Sunu Kodumthara, Southwestern Oklahoma State University; Laura R. Prieto, Simmons University Comment: Paul Finkelman, Gratz College This is the third session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be ...

This is the third session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Silvana R. Siddali's “African American Suffrage, Western State Constitutions, and the Fifteenth Amendment,” Sunu Kodumthara's “Oklahoma, the 19th Amendment, and the ‘Threat’ of Racial Equality,” and Laura R. Prieto's “Still Subjects, Not Sovereigns: The Nineteenth Amendment and American Empire in the Philippines.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg Conference, Online Event Conference Session 4 of 5: Is She Disqualified From Voting? 15 October 2020.Thursday, 1:30PM - 3:40PM This is an online program Corinne T. Field, University of Virginia; Nicole Etcheson, Ball State University; Kara W. Swanson, Northeastern University School of Law; Rabia S. Belt, Stanford Law School Comment: Paula Austin, Boston University This is the fourth session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be ...

This is the fourth session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider four pre-circulated essays: Corinne T. Field's “Turning Ridicule into Respect: Old Women and Leadership in the Long Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1850-1920,” Nicole Etcheson's “‘When Women Do Military Duty’: Women Suffrage and the Civil War Era,” Kara W. Swanson's, “Inventing Voters: Ability, Patents, and Civil Rights, 1870-1920,” and Rabia S. Belt's “Disability and the Struggle for Voting Rights.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/7474_amphitheatrum_ref.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons 15 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Fiona Deans Halloran and Pat Bagley Thomas Nast (1840-1902), pioneered American political cartooning. He created the Republican elephant ...

Thomas Nast (1840-1902), pioneered American political cartooning. He created the Republican elephant and popularized the depiction of Santa Claus. Many prominent figures felt the sting of biting satire, including “Boss” Tweed of Tammany Hall. However, Nast's legacy also includes contradictions. He supported civil rights, the Union Army, and Black veterans, but also used offensive stereotypical images of black men and suggested that their votes were easily manipulated. Halloran and celebrated editorial cartoonist Bagley will speak about the life and legacy of Thomas Nast with a particular focus on his views on African American voting and on cartooning as a form of political commentary.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg Conference, Online Event Conference Session 5 of 5: What did the Amendments Not Cover? 16 October 2020.Friday, 1:30PM - 3:30PM This is an online program Adam H. Domby, College of Charleston; Elizabeth Katz, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law Comment: Akhil Reed Amar, Yale Law School This is the final session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be ...

This is the final session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider two pre-circulated essays: Adam H. Domby's “The Lost Cause and the 15th Amendment: Disenfranchisement and the Passage of the 19th Amendment,” and Elizabeth Katz's “Women’s Suffrage and the Right to Hold Public Office.” The session will be followed by concluding remarks given by Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, and Christian Samito, Boston University School of Law.

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event The Confederation Period Origins of American Migration Policy 22 October 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Cody Nager, CUNY As migrants arrived in the United States after the 1783 Treaty of Paris, the new nation balanced the ...

As migrants arrived in the United States after the 1783 Treaty of Paris, the new nation balanced the economic potential of migration against domestic and international turmoil. Debates over regulation centered around potential disloyalty in the trans-Appalachian west, the environment of interstate competition, and foreign commercial interference. From these debates developed the first national migration policy codified when Congress passed the Naturalization Act of 1790.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/6406_hamilton_postconservation_work_lg.jpg Public Program, Online Event Hamilton the Musical 22 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Richard Bell, University of Maryland America has Hamilton-mania! Its crafty lyrics, hip-hop tunes, and big, bold story have ...

America has Hamilton-mania! Its crafty lyrics, hip-hop tunes, and big, bold story have rejuvenated interest in the real lives and true histories that Hamilton: the Musical puts center stage. In this talk, Dr. Richard Bell explores this musical phenomenon to reveal what its success tells us about the marriage of history and show-business. Bell will examine what the musical gets right and gets wrong about Alexander Hamilton, the American Revolution, and the birth of the United States. He will also discuss Hamilton’s cultural impact: what does its runaway success reveal about the stories we tell each other about who we are and about the nation we made?

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Tour Virtual Gallery Tour of Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 23 October 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program Peter Drummey, MHS Join Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian for a look at our virtual exhibition Who Counts? ...

Join Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian for a look at our virtual exhibition Who Counts? A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons.  Political cartoons have long served as provocateurs of public debate illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. Our show looks at how cartoons have explored two broad themes: efforts to expand access to voting and efforts to restrict access to voting. Illustrations explore voting as a civil right, women suffrage, and voting by mail as well as Gerrymandering, the Electoral College; and political corruption.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event Writing Uncompensated Emancipation into the Lost Cause 27 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Amanda Kleintop, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Comment: Nina Silber, Boston University After the US Civil War, white southerners claimed federal reimbursements for the value of freed ...

After the US Civil War, white southerners claimed federal reimbursements for the value of freed slaves Federal lawmakers rejected these claims in the Fourteenth Amendment. Yet, historians have long concluded that white southerners accepted uncompensated emancipation. Why did Americans forget these claims? This paper argues that white southerners abandoned them in the 1880s-1890s and rewrote history. They insisted that property in humans was “unprofitable,” and they did not need compensation after Confederate defeat. This narrative helped them reestablish political power and absolve themselves of four years of bloodshed and generations of enslavement. 

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Jefferson: Then and Now 29 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history ...

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

 

 

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November 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar, Online Event Success to the Literary Society! Black Male Youth Organizing in Early Nineteenth-Century Boston 5 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire, Durham Comment: Elizabeth McHenry, New York University In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young ...

In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young Men’s Literary Society in Boston with the stated aim to promote intellectual growth. The very success of this endeavor laid bare the severe educational inequalities and inequities that African American youth faced in Boston’s public schools. In response, these youth organized for change. This paper traces their organizing efforts and describes how their skills in composition, penmanship, elocution, and the literary arts set the stage for the “overthrow of caste schools” in Boston in 1855.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//20190220_103727.jpg Teacher Workshop Legislating the Environment: Teaching Environmental History and Civics (POSTPONED) 7 November 2020.Saturday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM $25 Registration Fee POSTPONED: This event has been postponed (exact date TBD). In partnership with the ...

POSTPONED: This event has been postponed (exact date TBD).

In partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, we will explore the intersections of environmental history, science, and engineering. Chad Montrie, Professor at UMass Lowell, will provide an overview to the study of environmental history, particularly as it relates to New England industry. Teachers will examine primary sources and participate in hands-on activities with Tsongas Center staff drawn from their "Industrial Watershed and "River as Classroom" programs.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

This program is made possible by the generous support of the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/thumbnail_Marblehead_Jeremiah_Lee_House_1768_grand_stair.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part I: What is a House Museum 9 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. ...
Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. In recent years there’s been a national conversation about the sustainability of house museums. Our presenter argues that this widespread, mostly small class of museums vary tremendously. While many of our community-based historical organizations preserve and present their collections in historic houses, a house museum is something different. We will hear from three outstanding organizations: The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, which operates The Mayflower Society House and The Mayflower Meetinghouse; the Jeremiah Lee Mansion at Marblehead Museum; and the Shaw Hudson House at Plainfield Historical Society. 

 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar, Online Event ‘Not to Us Chained’: Nature and the Radicalism of Sacco and Vanzetti 10 November 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Chad Montrie, UMass Lowell; Federico Paolini, Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli Comment: Avi Chomsky, Salem State University This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well ...

This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well as modern American radicalism by exploring the significance of nature in the lives and writing of anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, following a narrative arc from their formative years in different parts of the Italian countryside to their final years as dedicated revolutionaries confined to Massachusetts prisons.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Biography Seminar, Online Event How We Go On: Three Lives of Persistence, Resistance, and Resilience 12 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas Basbanes; Kimberly Hamlin, Miami University; John Loughery Julie Dobrow, Tufts University The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published ...

The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. As we know from the months of uncertainty we’ve all lived through so far, there are lessons about persistence, resistance and resilience to be learned from looking at the past. Tufts University professor Julie Dobrow, author of After Emily, will chair a panel featuring Nicholas Basbanes (Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), Kimberly Hamlin (Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener) and John Loughery (Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice of the American Century) to explore how their subjects prevailed in times of personal tragedy and public dissent, and how the authors learned to apply the lessons of their subjects to their own trials and travails as writers.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Capture.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part II: Authors' Houses 16 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Massachusetts has a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late ...

Massachusetts has a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late 19th century, authors’ houses were among the first to be preserved. In this next installment of this series, we will explore three outstanding authors’ houses: The Emily Dickenson Museum, which is comprised of the Homestead and the Evergreens; The Whittier Birthplace; and Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House. We will unpack how these three remarkable sites grapple with the challenges of audience engagement, preservation and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Young_Patron_Party_111720/Bully_Boy_Distillers.jpg Online Event Young Patron Party: Embrace your inner nerd! 17 November 2020.Tuesday, 8:00PM - 9:00PM This is a virtual event. Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party! Hosted by Tori ...

Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party!

Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast, this virtual event will feature a variety of entertaining activities. Join Bully Boy Distillers and Edgar B. Herwick III, host of the Curiosity Desk at GBH News, for lively cocktail-making demonstrations and engage in conversations with peer young patrons. The inaugural Rising History Maker Award will be presented to Dr. Karilyn Crockett, the City of Boston's first Chief of Equity.

Purchase pay-your-age tickets to receive advance cocktail recipes and automatic entry into door prize drawings. 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Untitled-3.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Penelope Winslow, Plymouth Colony First Lady: Re-Imagining a Life 18 November 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Michelle Marchetti Coughlin Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope ...

Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope Pelham Winslow, a woman of influence during the eventful years of Plymouth's existence, through wartime and the end of its independence. Tracking fragmentary records and traces of Penelope Winslow's material world, Coughlin illuminates the story of a long-forgotten historical figure and offers fresh insight into the experiences of women in early New England.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Digital History Seminar, Online Event Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore ...

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_image005.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part III: Hidden Gems 23 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. ...

Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. Collectively, they present and preserve the stuff and stories that make up our history - usually with an emphasis on local art, industries, and material culture. William Hosley has criss-crossed Massachusetts visiting them in every corner of the state, from Adams to Andover, Northampton to Nantucket. We will hear from three of what he calls gems - house museums and historicals with amazing stuff and stories, that fly a bit under the radar. Join us for a program featuring the Framingham History Center, Dedham Historical Society, and the Hatfield Historical Society. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Power_of_Objects.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America 30 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Jennifer Van Horn, University of Delaware Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and ...

Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and array of goods. Prof. Jennifer Van Horn investigates these diverse artifacts—from portraits and city views to gravestones, dressing furniture, and prosthetic devices—to explore how elite American consumers assembled objects to form a new civil society on the margins of the British Empire. In this interdisciplinary transatlantic study, artifacts emerge as key players in the formation of Anglo-American communities and eventually of American citizenship. This presentation is the second annual lecture in honor of President Emeritus Dennis Fiori in recognition of his leadership. This lecture is made possible by gifts from friends of the Society.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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December 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey ...

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington-Farmer’s paper explores how 18th century New Englanders diversified their thriving equine breeding and exportation business in an effort to meet an increasing demand for mules in the West Indies. Whilst New England's foray into mule breeding never reached the success of its horse enterprises, the lengths that farmers and merchants went to start a breeding program demonstrates how wider Atlantic markets drove New England’s economy.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar, Online Event Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 3 December 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College 1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the ...

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/3351howardbank_lg.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic 7 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joshua R. Greenberg Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in ...

Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in the United States, loosely regulated banks saturated the early American republic with upwards of 10,000 unique and legal bank notes. Joshua R. Greenberg shows how ordinary Americans accumulated and wielded the financial knowledge required to navigate interpersonal bank note transactions and argues that the shift from state-regulated banks and private shinplaster producers to federally authorized paper money in the Civil War era led to the erasure of the skill, knowledge, and lived experience with banking that informed debates over economic policy.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event “To Make Her Own Bargains with Boats:” Gender, Labor, and Freedom in the Western Steamboat World 8 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Alisha Hines, Wake Forest University Comment: Tiya Miles, Harvard University Free and enslaved Black women have been rendered nearly invisible in the historical andpopular ...

Free and enslaved Black women have been rendered nearly invisible in the historical and
popular imagination of the antebellum steamboat world. This essay examines how enslaved and free Black women negotiated power and place in this environment that was fraught with danger, but also brimming with opportunity. Hines argues that Black women who were unmoored from plantation landscapes by way of the western rivers trouble prevailing tropes of gendered mobility and immobility that pervade scholarship on slavery in the United States

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Development/HolidayCelebration-banner.jpg Online Event, Special Event MHS Holiday Celebration 9 December 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Jonathan Sarna, Brandeis University; Stewart McLaurin, White House Historical Association All are welcome to join us for this FREE virtual event! Lights and gatherings are an especially ...

All are welcome to join us for this FREE virtual event!

Lights and gatherings are an especially meaningful symbol of hope, celebration, warmth, and remembrance for many at this time of year. In this historic presidential election year, be inspired through an exploration of how the holidays come alive at the White House.

Dr. Jonathan Sarna, the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, will discuss the tradition of Hanukkah celebrations at the White House.

Stewart McLaurin, President of the White House Historical Association, will discuss the 2020 White House Christmas ornament commemorating President John F. Kennedy.

As an added bonus, the 2020 White House ornament will be available to purchase at a discount from December 1 to 10. Details will be sent with event registration confirmation.

View the invitation:

Images: U.S. Army LTC Rabbi Shmuel Felzenberg lights the Menorah during a Hanukkah reception Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead.). 2020 White House Christmas ornament.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Erie Excitement: The Confederacy’s Plans to Release Prisoners on the Great Lake 10 December 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cassy Jane Werking, University of Kentucky When the Confederacy faced mounting military setbacks from 1864 to the end of the war, the ...

When the Confederacy faced mounting military setbacks from 1864 to the end of the war, the Confederate government worked to advance the boundaries of warfare far beyond the South—and even beyond the United States. Lake Erie appealed to the Confederacy because the Union prison, Johnson’s Island, was located there and housed Confederate officers. There were plots planned and carried out by the Confederacy to release prisoners and use them as the force needed to attack the Union from the opposite direction—the North.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Turner_jacket.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty 14 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program John G. Turner, George Mason University Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave ...

Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave religious refugees who established Thanksgiving and democracy in the New England wilderness. The other is the story of unscrupulous invaders who betrayed their Indian allies, stole their land, and went to war against them. John G. Turner narrates a more complex history in They Knew They Were Pilgrims, tracing the contested meanings of liberty – and slavery – in the seven-decade history of Plymouth Colony.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 December 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas A. Basbanes In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of ...

In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a man who shaped the literature of a new nation with his countless poems, sonnets, stories, essays, translations, and whose renown was so wide-reaching that his deep friendships included Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Julia Ward Howe, and Charles Sumner. Highlighting research materials from the MHS archive, Basbanes will frame Longfellow’s life and work in the context of 19th century literary Boston.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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January 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/thumbnail_3538_Congressional-pugilists-for-e-blast.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation "At Noon on the 20th Day of January": Contested Elections in American History 9 January 2021.Saturday, 3:00PM - 4:30PM This is an online program Joanne B. Freeman, Yale University; Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia; Rachel A. Shelden, Penn State University; Erik B. Alexander, Southern Illinois University; moderated by Ted Widmer The 2020 Presidential Election took place in a profoundly polarized nation with a fractious and ...

The 2020 Presidential Election took place in a profoundly polarized nation with a fractious and unpredictable incumbent, leading to anxieties that there might not be a peaceful transfer of power. But this has happened before in the republic's history. This panel of esteemed scholars will place this historic moment in context. At what other points has the peaceful transition of presidential power been uncertain? What role does the Constitution play in establishing the tradition of presidential transition? And if bitterness and rancor is sometimes to be expected during presidential elections, at what point does it threaten democracy and influence the course of the nation?

The image above is “Congressional Pugilists”, a political cartoon depicting Matthew Lyon fighting with a federalist opponent on the floor of Congress early in 1798.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Rescued_from_Oblivion.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Rescued from Oblivion: Historical Cultures in the Early United States 11 January 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Alea Henle in conversation with Peter Drummey, MHS In 1791, a group of elite Bostonian men established the first historical society in the nation. With ...

In 1791, a group of elite Bostonian men established the first historical society in the nation. With in-depth research and an expansive scope, Alea Henle offers a vital account of the formation of historical culture and consciousness in the early United States, re-centering in the record groups long marginalized from the national memory. These societies laid the groundwork for professional practices that are still embraced today: collection policies, distinctions between preservation of textual and nontextual artifacts, publication programs, historical rituals and commemorations, and more. At the same time, officers of these early societies faced challenges to their historical authority from communities interested in preserving a broader range of materials and documenting more inclusive histories, including fellow members, popular historians, white women, and peoples of color.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar, Online Event, Seminar Water Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries 12 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Zachary Bennett, Norwich University Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut River restoration projects across North America are dismantling dams to restore the legendary fish ...

River restoration projects across North America are dismantling dams to restore the legendary fish runs of the past. People incorrectly point to the industrial revolution as the culprit. This paper will show that fish disappeared from most of southern New England’s rivers one hundred years before that. The destruction of New England’s fish runs triggered a cascade of economic and environmental changes that shaped legal and political culture during the Revolution and early republic.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/6861_jwinthrop_work_lg-1.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Settling the Good Land - Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England 1620-1650 14 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Agnès Delahaye, University of Lyon Settling the Good Land is the first institutional history of the Massachusetts Bay Company, ...

Settling the Good Land is the first institutional history of the Massachusetts Bay Company, a cornerstone of early modern English colonization in North America. Agnès Delahaye analyzes the settlement as a form of colonial innovation, to reveal the political significance of early New England sources, above and beyond religion. John Winthrop was not just a Puritan, but a settler governor who wrote the history of the expansion of his company as a record of successful and enduring policy. Delahaye argues that settlement, as the action and the experience of appropriating the land, is key to understanding the role played by Winthrop’s writings in American historiography, before independence and in our times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar High Brow, Low Brow: Phrenology, Fashion, and Female Activism in the Nineteenth Century 19 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Rachel Walker, University of Hartford Sari Altschuler, Northeastern University Between the 1830s and 1860s, Americans began fighting over a curious topic: female foreheads. While ...

Between the 1830s and 1860s, Americans began fighting over a curious topic: female foreheads. While feminists and phrenologists saw “high brows” as an alluring sign of intelligence in women, gender conservatives viewed them as a troubling assault on patriarchal hierarchies. At first glance, the public battles over female foreheads might seem like frivolous exchanges over women’s appearances. In reality, they were not just political conflicts but also scientific debates about the capacities of the female brain.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event Revolutionary Weddings: Marriage in the Black Panther Party 21 January 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Robyn Spencer, CUNY - Lehman College Revolutionary love and marriages in the Black Panther Party were powerful aspects of Black Power ...

Revolutionary love and marriages in the Black Panther Party were powerful aspects of Black Power politics. This paper argues that Panthers viewed Black romantic love as an act and a tool of revolution. They believed that, if African Americans embraced love and marriage, defining it and its parameters in ways that best suited individuals and race, they could reclaim, reimagine, and build strong Black families and communities, destabilize white supremacy, and realize Black liberation.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/Banner.jpg Seminar, Digital History Seminar, Online Event POSTPONED - Excavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project 26 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet ...

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED

The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the so-called “Golden Age” of Egyptian archaeology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Emma B. Andrews Diary Project (est. 2011), and the project’s processes for transcription, encoding, analysis and presentation in a digital format.

The Digital History Projects Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/winter_2021/province_of_affliction.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England 28 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Mutschler, Oregon State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Afflictions of all sorts coursed through eighteenth-century New England – towns and cities set ...

Afflictions of all sorts coursed through eighteenth-century New England – towns and cities set ablaze by epidemics, soldiers sickened and injured in the fight for empire, families and households laboring under an astonishing range of sufferings that were at once common and costly. This session will bring Ben Mutschler, author of The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England (Chicago, 2020), together with Liz Covart, podcast host of Ben Franklin’s World, to discuss how the early modern world addressed issues at once strange and familiar to us all.

Get 20% off the list price when you order Province of Affliction through UChicago Press using code BEN20 at checkout. 

 

 

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February 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/driving_while_black.jpg Online Event, Author Talk, Public Program Driving While Black: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights 1 February 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Gretchen Sorin, SUNY Oneonta in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Driving While Black demonstrates that the car—the ultimate symbol of independence and ...

Driving While Black demonstrates that the car—the ultimate symbol of independence and possibility— has always held particular importance for African Americans, allowing black families to evade the Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/61Aq3gMhSWL.jpg
dangers presented by an entrenched racist society and to enjoy, in some measure, the freedom of the open road. Melding new archival research with her family’s story, Gretchen Sorin recovers a lost history, demonstrating how, when combined with black travel guides—including the famous Green Book—the automobile encouraged a new way of resisting oppression.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics 2 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, ...

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/higher_laws.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Higher Laws: Black and White Transcendentalists and the Fight Against Slavery 4 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University In the cauldron of the antislavery movement, antislavery activists and Transcendentalist ...

In the cauldron of the antislavery movement, antislavery activists and Transcendentalist intellectuals, developed a "Higher Law" ethos, a unique set of romantic political sensibilities—marked by moral enthusiasms, democratic idealism, and a vision of the self that could judge political questions from "higher" standards of morality and reason. The Transcendentalism that emerges here was intended to fight slavery, but it would influence later labor, feminist, civil rights, and environmentalist activism. African American thinkers and activists have long engaged with American Transcendentalist ideas about "double consciousness," nonconformity, and civil disobedience. When thinkers like Martin Luther King, Jr., or W. E. B. Du Bois invoked Transcendentalist ideas, they were putting to use an intellectual movement that black radicals had participated in since the 1830s.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/gomes_banner.jpg Online Event Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 9 February 2021.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This is an online event. Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Please join us for a special evening in which historian Kerri Greenidge will receive the 2020 Gomes ...

Please join us for a special evening in which historian Kerri Greenidge will receive the 2020 Gomes Prize for Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter. Greenidge will join Annette Gordon-Reed in a conversation about Trotter’s pursuit of radical equality and Black self-determination, as well as the multilayered world of Black Boston that was not simply an abolitionist haven for former slaves but a segregated world with limited opportunity for even a Harvard-educated man like Trotter.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/crooked_path.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution 11 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program James Oakes, The Graduate Center, CUNY in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School Some celebrate Lincoln for freeing the slaves; others fault him for a long-standing conservatism on ...

Some celebrate Lincoln for freeing the slaves; others fault him for a long-standing conservatism on abolition and race. James Oakes provides another exploration of Lincoln and the end of slavery. Through the unforeseen challenges of the Civil War crisis, Lincoln and the Republican party adhered to a clear antislavery strategy founded on the Constitution itself. Lincoln and the Republicans claimed strong constitutional tools for federal action against slavery, and they used those tools consistently to undermine slavery, prevent its expansion, and pressure the slave states into abolition. This antislavery Constitution guided Lincoln and his allies as they navigated the sectional crisis and the Civil War. When the states finally ratified the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, it was a confirmation of a long-held vision.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Boston Women on Drugs 16 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University In the mid-20th century, Boston emerged as a laboratory for “the modern alcoholism movement ...

In the mid-20th century, Boston emerged as a laboratory for “the modern alcoholism movement,” a campaign to replace penal responses to chronic drunkenness with medico-moral treatment focused on returning white men to their appropriate breadwinner roles. In the late 1970s, radical feminist and women of color community health activists in Boston and Cambridge critiqued this system. This paper examines their attempts to create a more equitable, responsive, and genuinely feminist approach to substance abuse, and assesses their strengths and shortcomings.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Confronting Racial Injustice: Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Intergenerational Wealth 18 February 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Nicole Maskiell, University of South Carolina; Elon Cook Lee, National Trust for Historic Preservation; moderated by Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University This program is in partnership with Northeastern University Law School's Criminal Justice Task Force From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, slavery has been central to creating wealth and ...

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, slavery has been central to creating wealth and generating race-based inequality in Massachusetts. Family fortunes, institutional endowments, and public budgets in the commonwealth have all benefitted from the spoils of slavery. This panel discussion between academic and public historians explores Massachusetts’s connections to slavery and the slave trade, the wealth -- and the poverty -- slavery created and bequeathed, and how the legacies of slavery are reflected in injustices that haunt Massachusetts to this day.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar A Portal to the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, the Transcontinental Railroads, and Transpacific Trade, 1869–1914 23 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Sean Fraga, University of Southern California David Armitage, Harvard University The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture ...

The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and environment. But as Sean Fraga argues, these railroads also saw themselves as part of an emergent global steam-powered network. This paper shows how American interest in trade with East Asia motivated Northern Pacific Railway and Great Northern Railway to build transcontinental lines to Puget Sound. In doing so, these railroads left lasting impacts on the region’s lands, waters, and peoples.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/service-pnp-det-4a20000-4a28000-4a28600-4a28681v.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States 24 February 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Julia Rose Kraut Beginning with the Alien Friends Act of 1798, the United States passed laws in the name of national ...

Beginning with the Alien Friends Act of 1798, the United States passed laws in the name of national Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9780674976061_p0_v1_s1200x630.jpgsecurity to bar or expel foreigners based on their beliefs and associations—although these laws sometimes conflict with First Amendment protections of freedom of speech and association or contradict America’s self-image as a nation of immigrants. The government has continually used ideological exclusions and deportations of noncitizens to suppress dissent and radicalism throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from the War on Anarchy to the Cold War to the War on Terror. In Threat of Dissent, Julia Rose Kraut provides a comprehensive overview of the intersection of immigration law and the First Amendment.

 

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Protest and Citizenship: Revisited 25 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Stephen Kantrowitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Crystal Feimster, Yale University; Chad Williams, Brandeis University; Hasan Jeffries, Ohio State University Collective protest, in addition to being a constitutionally protected right, is a fundamental and ...

Collective protest, in addition to being a constitutionally protected right, is a fundamental and enduring part of American life and culture. Protest and agitation has at times proven a powerful way of advancing the rights and status of marginalized groups by swaying public opinion and fueling changes in law and public policy. Our panel of scholars will revisit an earlier conversation held in 2018, looking at the ways in which protest has been used to highlight injustice and change the citizenship rights of certain groups. In the wake of the high-profile demonstrations triggered by the murder of George Floyd, what can we take from the past to understand our current political and social climate?

 

 

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March 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Health, Disease, and Early American Environments - A Panel Discussion 2 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Molly Nebiolo, Northeastern University; Camden Elliott, Harvard University Comment: Thomas Wickman, Trinity College This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast ...

This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast new light on key sites of Colonial American history. Molly Nebiolo’s research highlights how health and medical knowledge impacted the creation of early Atlantic cities. By examining the colonial history of promotional narratives, both written and spatial, her paper argues that health and well-being were fundamental ideas for the settlement of Philadelphia and Charleston. Camden Elliott’s paper recasts the history of the Stono Slave Rebellion through the lens of environmental history. Placing mosquitoes (and their pathogens) in a supporting role to a slave war in South Carolina, he investigates how yellow fever helped set the stage for resistance and malaria shielded maroons in the rebellion’s aftermath.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/81hYYRIc6qL.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Strange Genius of Mr. O: The World of the United States' First Forgotten Celebrity 3 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University, in conversation with Sara Georgini, MHS When James Ogilvie arrived in America in 1793, he was a deeply ambitious but impoverished teacher. ...

When James Ogilvie arrived in America in 1793, he was a deeply ambitious but impoverished teacher. By the time he returned to Britain in 1817, he had become a bona fide celebrity known simply as Mr. O, counting the nation's leading politicians and intellectuals among his admirers. And then, like so many meteoric American luminaries afterward, he fell from grace. Ogilvie's career featured many of the hallmarks of celebrity we recognize from later eras: glamorous friends, eccentric clothing, scandalous religious views, narcissism, and even an alarming drug habit. Author Caroyln Eastman, along with Sara Georgini, will discuss Ogilvie’s history, which is at once a biography of a remarkable performer and a story of the United States during the founding era.

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg Online Event, Seminar, African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation 4 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and ...

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs 9 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in ...

As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs,1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine different archives or libraries. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9781623545352.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation From Revolution to Pandemic: What Makes Boston One of the World’s Top Innovation Centers? 24 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Robert Krim in conversation with Scott Kirsner Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that ...

Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that Changed the World, presents a fascinating journey through Boston’s innovation history. Looking at the range of Boston-born innovations that, over its 400-year history, have made Boston one of the world’s leading cities in innovation, Dr. Krim answers the question of why the city has remained innovative through its long history. He will describe in colorful detail the struggles the city—and its innovators—faced on their road to innovations which changed the nation or the world and will discuss how this unfettered innovative culture has helped the city reinvent itself after four devastating economic collapses.

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Marriage of Minds or Boston Divorce? The lives and good works of Caroline Healey Dall and Rev. Charles Henry Appleton Dall on two continents 25 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Neilesh Bose, University of Victorial; Helen R. Deese, Caroline Healey Dall Editor, Massachusetts Historical Society Moderator: Megan Marshall, Emerson College Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as ...

Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as a teenager in Margaret Fuller’s Conversations, Caroline learned to ask “all the great questions of life.” The handsome but sickly Charles graduated from Harvard with Henry Thoreau and was influenced by Joseph Tuckerman’s ministry to the poor. Marrying in 1844, the couple struggled to find their footing as Charles took a series of ministerial jobs, each punctuated by a period of illness. When Charles left Caroline and their two children in 1855 to establish a Unitarian mission in Calcutta, drawn to the Brahmo Samaj and the Indian nationalist cause, his health improved. “Separated by half the earth,” historian Spencer Lavan writes, “their careers began to blossom.” Caroline emerged as a vehement writer and lecturer on abolition, women’s rights, and social science. Bose and Deese will effect a 21st-century reconciliation, putting into conversation a couple whose divergence led to lives of distinctive activism, documented in Caroline’s extensive journals held at the MHS.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Parlor and the Public: Tin Pan Alley and the Birth of Manhattan Mass Culture 30 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Samuel Backer, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Jeffrey Melnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a ...

During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a revolutionary approach to publishing, constructing a system able to sell songs at a previously unimaginable scale and rate. Relying on New York’s central role in national performance networks to disseminate their compositions, this industry was defined by the tension between publishers’ attempts to create mass-marketing commodities, and the fast-moving, alcohol-drenched urban environments in which their products were required to thrive.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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April 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South 1 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Tyler Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of ...

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Environmental History Seminar, Online Event Kaleidoscope Metropolis: Autonomy and Integration in the Fractured City 13 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Garrett Nelson, Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan ...

By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan problems demanded municipal consolidation, meaningful regional integration became a political dead letter. This paper examines how conflicting pressures towards both spatial integration and disintegration shaped the postwar city, with ecological concepts about environmental management jostling against demands for community autonomy coming from both right and left. Struggle over geographic units thereby became a key axis of conflict between different ideological strands of the politics of place.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of ...

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns ...

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings ...

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionends Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 30 April 2021.Friday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for ...

Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionends Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons 30 April 2021.Friday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His ...

Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

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May 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard ...

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Environmental Book History and the Reception of The Limits to Growth 6 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cheryl Knott, University of Arizona
 
In 1972, the authors of The Limits to Growth launched a worldwide debate by asserting that continued overuse of the earth’s resources would likely lead to environmental and economic collapse. Environmental scientists, policy makers, and economists have critiqued the authors’ assumptions and methods; from the book historian’s perspective, their work constitutes one form  of reception. In this talk, Knott explores how bibliometric methods can be used to uncover additional aspects of the reception of Limits.
 
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Brown Bag, Online Event Making Home: Wabanaki and English Claims to Place, 1600-1830 13 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Joseph Hall, Bates College

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At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Wabanakis defined their claims to territory in terms of networks among places. English colonists redefined the region with property defined as polygons on the landscape. Understanding how both groups constructed ideas of property and homeland can help explain how colonists erased Indigenous residents in what became western Maine. It also shows how Wabanakis retained ties to the region.

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Public Program, Online Event Virtual Tour of the Old Colony History Museum 14 August 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Bronson Michaud, Curator of Collections and Katie MacDonald, Director OCHM Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/OCHM_LOGO_Horizontal.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

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Join us for a virtual tour of the Old Colony History Museum in Taunton, Massachusetts. It’s parent organization, the Old Colony Historical Society, was founded on May 4, 1853, making it one of New England’s oldest historical societies. The Museum's collections chronicle lives lived, wars waged, fortunes won and ingenuity rewarded. One of the most dynamic local historical societies in Massachusetts, OCHM hosts rotating exhibitions; a lively series of programs for both adults and children; and a research library specializing in local history and genealogy.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event Interpreting Neutrality during the American Revolution in the Northeast Borderlands 20 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Darcy Stevens, University of Maine

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Rebellion, neutrality and loyalty existed on a spectrum that inhabitants in the Borderlands of Maine and Nova Scotia moved along throughout the war. Likewise, British and American officials’ interpretations and acceptance of neutrality was malleable. Examining neutrals, rebels, loyalists, New England Planters, Wabanaki, and Acadians in the Borderlands reveals factors which impacted personal decisions and official policy about neutrality. Recognizing the complexity of neutrality restores agency to individuals and suggests a new terrain for assessing revolutionary actors as they were buffeted by wartime change.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Running toward Abolition: Fugitive Slaves, Legal Rights, and the Coming of the Civil War 27 August 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Turiano, CUNY
 
This talk tells the story of the long political fight over the legal rights of accused fugitive slaves in the United States. That conflict—fought as often in Congress as before local judges—revealed fundamental weaknesses in the Constitution’s ability to keep peace in a half-slave, half-free nation. Abolitionists saw this opportunity and thrust the fight into electoral politics. It was central to the long- and short-term origins of the American Civil War.
 
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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Standing Up, Stepping Forward, and Speaking Out: The Political Courage to take a Principled Stand 9 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online event John Dean, William Weld, and Edward Widmer Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/service-pnp-ppmsca-67900-67923v.jpg

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Watergate was a sea change in American politics.  But even as a presidential scandal gripped the nation, there were remarkable displays of political courage, as Republicans and Democrats found ways to work together for the good of the nation, and wrote new rules to ensure transparency and integrity. What can we learn from Watergate? Specifically, what can we learn from the people who stood up, stepped forward and spoke out against wrongs that they saw within their own party and among their friends? How can this help us understand the role of collaborationists in the past and today and the need for political courage. Join us for a conversation between John Dean, former White House Counsel to President Richard Nixon who was implicated in the Watergate scandal but later testified against Nixon; William Weld, former Massachusetts Governor and US presidential candidate, who began his legal career as a counsel on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's impeachment inquiry staff for the impeachment process against Richard Nixon in 1974; and historian Edward Widmer.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

Image: Leffler, Warren K, photographer. House Banking Committee hearing on Watergate Incident / WKL. Washington D.C, 1972. [10/12/72 12 Oct] Photograph (www.loc.gov/item/2020631032/).

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event John Adams and China: Globalizing Early America 10 September 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Yiyun Huang, The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

John Adams consumed a lot of Chinese tea. He especially appreciated the medical benefits associated with the hot beverage. In a 1757 diary entry, he wrote that "nothing but large potions of tea" could extinguish his heartburn. How did Adams know that Chinese tea cured heartburn?  Why did he believe that nothing else was as effective? This talk examines the ways medical ideas transferred across the world during the eighteenth century.

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Public Program, Conversation, Online Event The Boston Red Sox and WWII 14 September 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by Gorden Edes, Historian of the Boston Red Sox, with authors Bill Nowlin, Anne Keene and Michael Connelly Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/1942_Williams_Ted_WWII_104.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Image courtesy of the Boston Red Sox

In this 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, join Boston Red Sox historian Gordon Edes and a panel of distinguished authors to discuss the role of Major League Baseball players from Boston in the conduct of that historic conflict. The story touches upon Ted Williams, a Naval flight instructor who would later fly combat missions for the Marines in the Korean War, but also tells of compelling acts of sacrifice and bravery performed by other big-leaguers from Boston, including Si Rosenthal and Earl Johnson of the Red Sox and Warren Spahn of the Braves.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Exhibition Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons this event is free 15 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

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Public Program, Online Event Pilgrims' Progress: Music of the Plimoth Colony Settlers 1590-1645 16 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Burciaga, Dan Meyers, and Matthew Wright of Seven Times Salt Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/2013-Seven-Times-Salt-MSP-5082_-_Copy.jpg

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The Plimoth colonists were a diverse group of Separatists and Anglicans, English and Dutch, some religious and some not! They brought with them varied music experiences, and Plimoth Colony heard not only psalms but also catches, ballads, and dance tunes. We'll follow the settlers from England to religious refuge in the Netherlands and onward to the early years of Plimoth. You'll hear music of the Elizabethan tavern and theater, spirited drinking songs, Dutch love songs, psalms from Sternhold & Hopkins’ Whole Booke of Psalmes, and traditional English country dance tunes.

 

 

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Online Event Graduate Student Reception 17 September 2020.Thursday, 3:30PM - 4:30PM Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/MHS067-evening.jpg

Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please join us at our eleventh annual Graduate Student Reception for students in history, American Studies, and related fields. This year we invite you to join a virtual gathering to learn about the resources the MHS offers to support your scholarship, from research fellowships to our seminar series.

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Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and the Making of the Cold War 21 September 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Luke A. Nichter, Texas A&M University-Central Texas Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_Nichter_jacket.jpg

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A key figure in American foreign policy for three decades, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts, a well-heeled Eastern Establishment Republican, put duty over partisanship to serve as advisor to five presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to Gerald Ford and as United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Vietnam, West Germany, and the Vatican. Historian Luke A. Nichter gives us a compelling narrative of Lodge’s extraordinary and consequential life and his immense political influence.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event “The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies” 22 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lauren Duval, University of Oklahoma Comment: Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American homes and the wartime violence within them—particularly directed against women—were prominent subjects in novels and historical paintings. Reimagining women’s interactions with British soldiers solely as relationships of violence and deception, not volition, these narratives promoted a gendered vision of wartime domestic invasion and violation that would, in memory, come to define the war’s devastation and contribute to emergent ideas about the meaning of independence.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French 23 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Harold Holzer, Hunter College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/daniel_chester_french_cropped.jpg

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Daniel Chester French is America's best-known sculptor of public monuments, having created the statue for the Lincoln Memorial, the John Harvard statue, and The Minute Man in Concord. This new biography combines rich personal details from French's life with a nuanced study of his artistic evolution. It explores French’s diligent dedication to perfecting his craft with beautiful archival photographs of his life and work.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event “We Have Always Regarded the Question of Slavery, as Really and Essentially That of Labor”: The Intersection of Race, Class, and Slavery in Radical Antebellum Boston 24 September 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Sean Griffin, CUNY

In the years before the Civil War, Boston was at the forefront of numerous American radical and reform movements. At the same time, the city was also a site of contestation over which reforms should take priority. Although these tensions could at times grow heated, this talk examines the ways that the relationship between the abolitionist and the early labor (or “social reform”) movements in Boston was marked by conversation and cooperation as much as competition, revealing an overlap of personnel and ideas that in many ways grew stronger as the country headed towards an irrepressible conflict over slavery.”  

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event "No unseated crowd is liable to be orderly" : Organizing Audiences around Spectacle in the Industrial Era 29 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Scott Kushner, University of Rhode Island Comment: Derek Miller, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

Crowd control technologies—turnstiles, bleachers, stanchions, and seats—channel bodies through the spaces of cultural performance: theater, music, and sport. The increasing rationalization and standardization of crowd control in the early 20th century corresponds with a critical and popular understanding of crowds as dangerous and destabilizing. This paper mines archival evidence to show how industrial-age crowd control was framed as technology that ordered masses (into lines or rows), thereby rendering masses orderly (cooperative, docile, and non-threatening).

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Exhibition Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons this event is free 30 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Will Public Education Survive?: A Look at the Threats to Education Systems from Privatization and Religious Nationalism 30 September 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Katherine Stewart and Diane Ravitch, New York University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/stewart-ravitch.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

The rise of the Religious Right has coincided with the privatization movement in public schools. While some may feel that this is coincidental, there is reason to believe there is a directly causal relationship between these two factors. Two scholars, from different disciplines, will discuss how their work comes together to help explain the history and current state of efforts to diminish, if not dismantle, the American public education system. Katherine Stewart has written on the rise and increasing power of the Religious Right in her book The Power Worshipers. She will be joined by Diane Ravitch who has written extensively on education and, in her recent book Slaying Goliath, explores the history of the school privatization movement and the efforts to oppose it.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Rule Britannia: Imperial Patriots and the Siege of Louisbourg of 1745 1 October 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Amy Watson, University of Southern California

In 1745, a group of New England volunteers who called themselves Patriots launched an expedition against the French fortress of Louisbourg, in present-day Nova Scotia. Who were these “Patriots”? What did they want with Louisbourg? And what can this incident tell us about British imperial politics in the mid-eighteenth century? This expedition reveals that the British Empire was dividing on sharp partisan lines in the 1740s, laying the groundwork for the revolutionary decades to come.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Political Cartooning 1 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Paul Szep and William Martin Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_tom_nast.jpg

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Paul Szep, a two-time Pulitzer Prize and Thomas Nast Prize winning editorial cartoonist and New York Times best-selling author William Martin will discuss their careers. They will focus on Szep’s time as the Chief Editorial Cartoonist at The Boston Globe from 1967 – 2001 and a look at how the field of political cartoons has changed. Szep has been described as a pioneering cartoonist with “scathing wit and a drawing style that turns editorial cartoons into pieces of art.” Martin has written eleven novels, many of which are set in and around Boston and has been recognized with the New England Book Award and the Samuel Eliot Morrison Award.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 6 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery.  By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy.  Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.”  This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.  

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Postponed:
Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity
7 October 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This program has been postponed. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Queer Institutions – A Panel Discussion 8 October 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Marc Stein, San Francisco State University; Ashley Ruderman-Looff, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Comment: Aaron S. Lecklider, UMass Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

This panel discussion considers the queer histories of two modern institutions: colleges and prisons. Marc Stein explores how activists at more than twenty colleges went to court in the 1970s to challenge their institutions’ refusal to recognize LGBT student groups. Stein’s paper analyzes these cases and situates the successful litigation at Virginia Commonwealth University in relation to contemporaneous Virginia rulings that upheld the criminalization of same-sex sodomy and the prosecution of an interracial threesome. Ashley Ruderman-Looff’s essay considers the Lavender Scare's impact on women's prison reform. Her essay tells the story of Dr. Miriam Van Waters, a superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory for Women who was dismissed from her post in 1949. This paper analyzes Van Waters’ subversive use of the Rorschach inkblot test, allowing her to eschew homosexual diagnosis and include queer women in the reformatory’s rehabilitative programs.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Public Program, Tour, Online Event Tour of Boston Monuments 9 October 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program Eleanor Citron

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In recent history, the question of what to do with monuments--particularly those of Confederate origins--has become a source of contentious debate. The City of Boston only possessed one such monument on Georges Island, however, it was removed in 2017. Does this mean that Boston no longer possesses any problematic statues? In the words of Boston Globe journalist Ty Burr, “Are Boston’s statues honoring all the right men?” And, who gets to decide?

Join Eleanor Citron, MHS’s summer intern, for a virtual tour of Metro Boston’s monuments--from those championed by the city, to those beheaded or uprooted, and things in between.

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Conference, Online Event Conference Session 1 of 5: Biographies of Suffrage Champions 12 October 2020.Monday, 2:00PM - 4:00PM This is an online program Ellen DuBois, University of California Los Angeles; Thomas Dublin, SUNY Binghamton; N. Lynn Eckhert, Partners Healthcare International Comment: Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg

Join us for the opening session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications." MHS President Catherine Allgor will give opening remarks at 2:00pm

The first of five conference sessions, "Biographies of Suffrage Champions" will begin at 2:30pm. This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Ellen DuBois's “Frederick Douglass & Elizabeth Cady Stanton,” Thomas Dublin's “The Changing Shape of the Black Women Suffrage Movement, 1870-1920," and N. Lynn Eckhert's “The Role of African American and Women Physicians in Voting Rights in America.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

 

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Conference, Online Event Conference Session 2 of 5: Marriage and the Amendments 13 October 2020.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:40PM This is an online program Helene Quanquin, University of Lille; Carol Faulkner, Syracuse University; Jessica Derleth, SUNY Binghamton Comment: Kathi Kern, University of Kentucky Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg

This is the second session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Helene Quanquin's “Troubling Marriage: Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster and the Fifteenth Amendment,” Carol Faulkner's “Suffrage and the Specter of Interracial Marriage,” and Jessica Derleth's “Marital Unity Through the Franchise: Suffragists’ Manipulation of Gender and Marriage Norms.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event A People’s Guide to Greater Boston 13 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joseph Nevins, Vassar College; Suren Moodliar, Eleni Macrakis Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Peoples_guide_to_boston.jpg

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A People's Guide to Greater Boston reveals the region’s richness and vibrancy in ways that are neglected by traditional area guidebooks and obscured by many tourist destinations. It highlights tales of the places and people involved in movements to abolish slavery; to end war and militarism; to achieve Native sovereignty, racial equity, gender justice, and sexual liberation; and to secure workers’ rights. This one-of-a-kind guide points the way to a radically democratic Greater Boston, one that sparks social and environmental justice and inclusivity for all.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

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Conference, Online Event Conference Session 3 of 5: The Federal Government and Voting Rights in States and Across the Empire 14 October 2020.Wednesday, 2:00PM - 3:40PM This is an online program Silvana R. Siddali, Saint Louis University; Sunu Kodumthara, Southwestern Oklahoma State University; Laura R. Prieto, Simmons University Comment: Paul Finkelman, Gratz College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg

This is the third session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider three pre-circulated essays: Silvana R. Siddali's “African American Suffrage, Western State Constitutions, and the Fifteenth Amendment,” Sunu Kodumthara's “Oklahoma, the 19th Amendment, and the ‘Threat’ of Racial Equality,” and Laura R. Prieto's “Still Subjects, Not Sovereigns: The Nineteenth Amendment and American Empire in the Philippines.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Conference, Online Event Conference Session 4 of 5: Is She Disqualified From Voting? 15 October 2020.Thursday, 1:30PM - 3:40PM This is an online program Corinne T. Field, University of Virginia; Nicole Etcheson, Ball State University; Kara W. Swanson, Northeastern University School of Law; Rabia S. Belt, Stanford Law School Comment: Paula Austin, Boston University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg

This is the fourth session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider four pre-circulated essays: Corinne T. Field's “Turning Ridicule into Respect: Old Women and Leadership in the Long Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1850-1920,” Nicole Etcheson's “‘When Women Do Military Duty’: Women Suffrage and the Civil War Era,” Kara W. Swanson's, “Inventing Voters: Ability, Patents, and Civil Rights, 1870-1920,” and Rabia S. Belt's “Disability and the Struggle for Voting Rights.”

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons 15 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Fiona Deans Halloran and Pat Bagley Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/7474_amphitheatrum_ref.jpg

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Thomas Nast (1840-1902), pioneered American political cartooning. He created the Republican elephant and popularized the depiction of Santa Claus. Many prominent figures felt the sting of biting satire, including “Boss” Tweed of Tammany Hall. However, Nast's legacy also includes contradictions. He supported civil rights, the Union Army, and Black veterans, but also used offensive stereotypical images of black men and suggested that their votes were easily manipulated. Halloran and celebrated editorial cartoonist Bagley will speak about the life and legacy of Thomas Nast with a particular focus on his views on African American voting and on cartooning as a form of political commentary.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Conference, Online Event Conference Session 5 of 5: What did the Amendments Not Cover? 16 October 2020.Friday, 1:30PM - 3:30PM This is an online program Adam H. Domby, College of Charleston; Elizabeth Katz, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law Comment: Akhil Reed Amar, Yale Law School Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/cfp_image.jpg

This is the final session of the virtual 2020 Conrad E. Wright Research Conference, "'Shall Not Be Denied': The 15th and 19th Amendments at the Sesquicentennial and Centennial of Their Ratifications."

This panel discussion will consider two pre-circulated essays: Adam H. Domby's “The Lost Cause and the 15th Amendment: Disenfranchisement and the Passage of the 19th Amendment,” and Elizabeth Katz's “Women’s Suffrage and the Right to Hold Public Office.” The session will be followed by concluding remarks given by Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, and Christian Samito, Boston University School of Law.

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email for each session containing Zoom log-in information as well as instructions for accessing conference papers. Please register for each conference session you would like to attend. Learn more about the full conference. The events are free and open to everyone.

 

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Brown Bag, Online Event The Confederation Period Origins of American Migration Policy 22 October 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM This is an online program Cody Nager, CUNY

As migrants arrived in the United States after the 1783 Treaty of Paris, the new nation balanced the economic potential of migration against domestic and international turmoil. Debates over regulation centered around potential disloyalty in the trans-Appalachian west, the environment of interstate competition, and foreign commercial interference. From these debates developed the first national migration policy codified when Congress passed the Naturalization Act of 1790.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Public Program, Online Event Hamilton the Musical 22 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Richard Bell, University of Maryland Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/6406_hamilton_postconservation_work_lg.jpg

America has Hamilton-mania! Its crafty lyrics, hip-hop tunes, and big, bold story have rejuvenated interest in the real lives and true histories that Hamilton: the Musical puts center stage. In this talk, Dr. Richard Bell explores this musical phenomenon to reveal what its success tells us about the marriage of history and show-business. Bell will examine what the musical gets right and gets wrong about Alexander Hamilton, the American Revolution, and the birth of the United States. He will also discuss Hamilton’s cultural impact: what does its runaway success reveal about the stories we tell each other about who we are and about the nation we made?

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Tour Virtual Gallery Tour of Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 23 October 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program Peter Drummey, MHS

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Join Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian for a look at our virtual exhibition Who Counts? A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons.  Political cartoons have long served as provocateurs of public debate illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. Our show looks at how cartoons have explored two broad themes: efforts to expand access to voting and efforts to restrict access to voting. Illustrations explore voting as a civil right, women suffrage, and voting by mail as well as Gerrymandering, the Electoral College; and political corruption.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event Writing Uncompensated Emancipation into the Lost Cause 27 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Amanda Kleintop, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Comment: Nina Silber, Boston University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

After the US Civil War, white southerners claimed federal reimbursements for the value of freed slaves Federal lawmakers rejected these claims in the Fourteenth Amendment. Yet, historians have long concluded that white southerners accepted uncompensated emancipation. Why did Americans forget these claims? This paper argues that white southerners abandoned them in the 1880s-1890s and rewrote history. They insisted that property in humans was “unprofitable,” and they did not need compensation after Confederate defeat. This narrative helped them reestablish political power and absolve themselves of four years of bloodshed and generations of enslavement. 

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Jefferson: Then and Now 29 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg

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The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

 

 

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African American History Seminar, Online Event Success to the Literary Society! Black Male Youth Organizing in Early Nineteenth-Century Boston 5 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire, Durham Comment: Elizabeth McHenry, New York University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young Men’s Literary Society in Boston with the stated aim to promote intellectual growth. The very success of this endeavor laid bare the severe educational inequalities and inequities that African American youth faced in Boston’s public schools. In response, these youth organized for change. This paper traces their organizing efforts and describes how their skills in composition, penmanship, elocution, and the literary arts set the stage for the “overthrow of caste schools” in Boston in 1855.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Teacher Workshop Legislating the Environment: Teaching Environmental History and Civics (POSTPONED) 7 November 2020.Saturday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM $25 Registration Fee Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//20190220_103727.jpg

POSTPONED: This event has been postponed (exact date TBD).

In partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, we will explore the intersections of environmental history, science, and engineering. Chad Montrie, Professor at UMass Lowell, will provide an overview to the study of environmental history, particularly as it relates to New England industry. Teachers will examine primary sources and participate in hands-on activities with Tsongas Center staff drawn from their "Industrial Watershed and "River as Classroom" programs.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

This program is made possible by the generous support of the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation.

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part I: What is a House Museum 9 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/thumbnail_Marblehead_Jeremiah_Lee_House_1768_grand_stair.jpg

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Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. In recent years there’s been a national conversation about the sustainability of house museums. Our presenter argues that this widespread, mostly small class of museums vary tremendously. While many of our community-based historical organizations preserve and present their collections in historic houses, a house museum is something different. We will hear from three outstanding organizations: The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, which operates The Mayflower Society House and The Mayflower Meetinghouse; the Jeremiah Lee Mansion at Marblehead Museum; and the Shaw Hudson House at Plainfield Historical Society. 

 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Environmental History Seminar, Online Event ‘Not to Us Chained’: Nature and the Radicalism of Sacco and Vanzetti 10 November 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Chad Montrie, UMass Lowell; Federico Paolini, Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli Comment: Avi Chomsky, Salem State University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well as modern American radicalism by exploring the significance of nature in the lives and writing of anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, following a narrative arc from their formative years in different parts of the Italian countryside to their final years as dedicated revolutionaries confined to Massachusetts prisons.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Biography Seminar, Online Event How We Go On: Three Lives of Persistence, Resistance, and Resilience 12 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas Basbanes; Kimberly Hamlin, Miami University; John Loughery Julie Dobrow, Tufts University

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The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. As we know from the months of uncertainty we’ve all lived through so far, there are lessons about persistence, resistance and resilience to be learned from looking at the past. Tufts University professor Julie Dobrow, author of After Emily, will chair a panel featuring Nicholas Basbanes (Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), Kimberly Hamlin (Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener) and John Loughery (Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice of the American Century) to explore how their subjects prevailed in times of personal tragedy and public dissent, and how the authors learned to apply the lessons of their subjects to their own trials and travails as writers.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part II: Authors' Houses 16 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Capture.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Massachusetts has a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late 19th century, authors’ houses were among the first to be preserved. In this next installment of this series, we will explore three outstanding authors’ houses: The Emily Dickenson Museum, which is comprised of the Homestead and the Evergreens; The Whittier Birthplace; and Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House. We will unpack how these three remarkable sites grapple with the challenges of audience engagement, preservation and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Online Event Young Patron Party: Embrace your inner nerd! 17 November 2020.Tuesday, 8:00PM - 9:00PM This is a virtual event. Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Young_Patron_Party_111720/Bully_Boy_Distillers.jpg

Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party!

Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast, this virtual event will feature a variety of entertaining activities. Join Bully Boy Distillers and Edgar B. Herwick III, host of the Curiosity Desk at GBH News, for lively cocktail-making demonstrations and engage in conversations with peer young patrons. The inaugural Rising History Maker Award will be presented to Dr. Karilyn Crockett, the City of Boston's first Chief of Equity.

Purchase pay-your-age tickets to receive advance cocktail recipes and automatic entry into door prize drawings. 

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Penelope Winslow, Plymouth Colony First Lady: Re-Imagining a Life 18 November 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Michelle Marchetti Coughlin Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Untitled-3.jpg

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Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope Pelham Winslow, a woman of influence during the eventful years of Plymouth's existence, through wartime and the end of its independence. Tracking fragmentary records and traces of Penelope Winslow's material world, Coughlin illuminates the story of a long-forgotten historical figure and offers fresh insight into the experiences of women in early New England.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Digital History Seminar, Online Event Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part III: Hidden Gems 23 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_image005.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. Collectively, they present and preserve the stuff and stories that make up our history - usually with an emphasis on local art, industries, and material culture. William Hosley has criss-crossed Massachusetts visiting them in every corner of the state, from Adams to Andover, Northampton to Nantucket. We will hear from three of what he calls gems - house museums and historicals with amazing stuff and stories, that fly a bit under the radar. Join us for a program featuring the Framingham History Center, Dedham Historical Society, and the Hatfield Historical Society. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America 30 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Jennifer Van Horn, University of Delaware Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Power_of_Objects.jpg

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Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and array of goods. Prof. Jennifer Van Horn investigates these diverse artifacts—from portraits and city views to gravestones, dressing furniture, and prosthetic devices—to explore how elite American consumers assembled objects to form a new civil society on the margins of the British Empire. In this interdisciplinary transatlantic study, artifacts emerge as key players in the formation of Anglo-American communities and eventually of American citizenship. This presentation is the second annual lecture in honor of President Emeritus Dennis Fiori in recognition of his leadership. This lecture is made possible by gifts from friends of the Society.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington-Farmer’s paper explores how 18th century New Englanders diversified their thriving equine breeding and exportation business in an effort to meet an increasing demand for mules in the West Indies. Whilst New England's foray into mule breeding never reached the success of its horse enterprises, the lengths that farmers and merchants went to start a breeding program demonstrates how wider Atlantic markets drove New England’s economy.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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African American History Seminar, Online Event Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 3 December 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic 7 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joshua R. Greenberg Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/3351howardbank_lg.jpg

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Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in the United States, loosely regulated banks saturated the early American republic with upwards of 10,000 unique and legal bank notes. Joshua R. Greenberg shows how ordinary Americans accumulated and wielded the financial knowledge required to navigate interpersonal bank note transactions and argues that the shift from state-regulated banks and private shinplaster producers to federally authorized paper money in the Civil War era led to the erasure of the skill, knowledge, and lived experience with banking that informed debates over economic policy.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event “To Make Her Own Bargains with Boats:” Gender, Labor, and Freedom in the Western Steamboat World 8 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Alisha Hines, Wake Forest University Comment: Tiya Miles, Harvard University

Free and enslaved Black women have been rendered nearly invisible in the historical and
popular imagination of the antebellum steamboat world. This essay examines how enslaved and free Black women negotiated power and place in this environment that was fraught with danger, but also brimming with opportunity. Hines argues that Black women who were unmoored from plantation landscapes by way of the western rivers trouble prevailing tropes of gendered mobility and immobility that pervade scholarship on slavery in the United States

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Online Event, Special Event MHS Holiday Celebration 9 December 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Jonathan Sarna, Brandeis University; Stewart McLaurin, White House Historical Association Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Development/HolidayCelebration-banner.jpg

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All are welcome to join us for this FREE virtual event!

Lights and gatherings are an especially meaningful symbol of hope, celebration, warmth, and remembrance for many at this time of year. In this historic presidential election year, be inspired through an exploration of how the holidays come alive at the White House.

Dr. Jonathan Sarna, the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, will discuss the tradition of Hanukkah celebrations at the White House.

Stewart McLaurin, President of the White House Historical Association, will discuss the 2020 White House Christmas ornament commemorating President John F. Kennedy.

As an added bonus, the 2020 White House ornament will be available to purchase at a discount from December 1 to 10. Details will be sent with event registration confirmation.

View the invitation:

Images: U.S. Army LTC Rabbi Shmuel Felzenberg lights the Menorah during a Hanukkah reception Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead.). 2020 White House Christmas ornament.

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Brown Bag, Online Event Erie Excitement: The Confederacy’s Plans to Release Prisoners on the Great Lake 10 December 2020.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Cassy Jane Werking, University of Kentucky

When the Confederacy faced mounting military setbacks from 1864 to the end of the war, the Confederate government worked to advance the boundaries of warfare far beyond the South—and even beyond the United States. Lake Erie appealed to the Confederacy because the Union prison, Johnson’s Island, was located there and housed Confederate officers. There were plots planned and carried out by the Confederacy to release prisoners and use them as the force needed to attack the Union from the opposite direction—the North.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty 14 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program John G. Turner, George Mason University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Turner_jacket.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave religious refugees who established Thanksgiving and democracy in the New England wilderness. The other is the story of unscrupulous invaders who betrayed their Indian allies, stole their land, and went to war against them. John G. Turner narrates a more complex history in They Knew They Were Pilgrims, tracing the contested meanings of liberty – and slavery – in the seven-decade history of Plymouth Colony.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 December 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas A. Basbanes

In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a man who shaped the literature of a new nation with his countless poems, sonnets, stories, essays, translations, and whose renown was so wide-reaching that his deep friendships included Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Julia Ward Howe, and Charles Sumner. Highlighting research materials from the MHS archive, Basbanes will frame Longfellow’s life and work in the context of 19th century literary Boston.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation "At Noon on the 20th Day of January": Contested Elections in American History 9 January 2021.Saturday, 3:00PM - 4:30PM This is an online program Joanne B. Freeman, Yale University; Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia; Rachel A. Shelden, Penn State University; Erik B. Alexander, Southern Illinois University; moderated by Ted Widmer Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/thumbnail_3538_Congressional-pugilists-for-e-blast.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

The 2020 Presidential Election took place in a profoundly polarized nation with a fractious and unpredictable incumbent, leading to anxieties that there might not be a peaceful transfer of power. But this has happened before in the republic's history. This panel of esteemed scholars will place this historic moment in context. At what other points has the peaceful transition of presidential power been uncertain? What role does the Constitution play in establishing the tradition of presidential transition? And if bitterness and rancor is sometimes to be expected during presidential elections, at what point does it threaten democracy and influence the course of the nation?

The image above is “Congressional Pugilists”, a political cartoon depicting Matthew Lyon fighting with a federalist opponent on the floor of Congress early in 1798.

 

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Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Rescued from Oblivion: Historical Cultures in the Early United States 11 January 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Alea Henle in conversation with Peter Drummey, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Rescued_from_Oblivion.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

In 1791, a group of elite Bostonian men established the first historical society in the nation. With in-depth research and an expansive scope, Alea Henle offers a vital account of the formation of historical culture and consciousness in the early United States, re-centering in the record groups long marginalized from the national memory. These societies laid the groundwork for professional practices that are still embraced today: collection policies, distinctions between preservation of textual and nontextual artifacts, publication programs, historical rituals and commemorations, and more. At the same time, officers of these early societies faced challenges to their historical authority from communities interested in preserving a broader range of materials and documenting more inclusive histories, including fellow members, popular historians, white women, and peoples of color.

 

 

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Environmental History Seminar, Online Event, Seminar Water Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries 12 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Zachary Bennett, Norwich University Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

River restoration projects across North America are dismantling dams to restore the legendary fish runs of the past. People incorrectly point to the industrial revolution as the culprit. This paper will show that fish disappeared from most of southern New England’s rivers one hundred years before that. The destruction of New England’s fish runs triggered a cascade of economic and environmental changes that shaped legal and political culture during the Revolution and early republic.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Settling the Good Land - Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England 1620-1650 14 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Agnès Delahaye, University of Lyon Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/6861_jwinthrop_work_lg-1.jpg

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Settling the Good Land is the first institutional history of the Massachusetts Bay Company, a cornerstone of early modern English colonization in North America. Agnès Delahaye analyzes the settlement as a form of colonial innovation, to reveal the political significance of early New England sources, above and beyond religion. John Winthrop was not just a Puritan, but a settler governor who wrote the history of the expansion of his company as a record of successful and enduring policy. Delahaye argues that settlement, as the action and the experience of appropriating the land, is key to understanding the role played by Winthrop’s writings in American historiography, before independence and in our times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar High Brow, Low Brow: Phrenology, Fashion, and Female Activism in the Nineteenth Century 19 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Rachel Walker, University of Hartford Sari Altschuler, Northeastern University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

Between the 1830s and 1860s, Americans began fighting over a curious topic: female foreheads. While feminists and phrenologists saw “high brows” as an alluring sign of intelligence in women, gender conservatives viewed them as a troubling assault on patriarchal hierarchies. At first glance, the public battles over female foreheads might seem like frivolous exchanges over women’s appearances. In reality, they were not just political conflicts but also scientific debates about the capacities of the female brain.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event Revolutionary Weddings: Marriage in the Black Panther Party 21 January 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Robyn Spencer, CUNY - Lehman College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

Revolutionary love and marriages in the Black Panther Party were powerful aspects of Black Power politics. This paper argues that Panthers viewed Black romantic love as an act and a tool of revolution. They believed that, if African Americans embraced love and marriage, defining it and its parameters in ways that best suited individuals and race, they could reclaim, reimagine, and build strong Black families and communities, destabilize white supremacy, and realize Black liberation.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, Digital History Seminar, Online Event POSTPONED - Excavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project registration required at no cost 26 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/Banner.jpg

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED

The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the so-called “Golden Age” of Egyptian archaeology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Emma B. Andrews Diary Project (est. 2011), and the project’s processes for transcription, encoding, analysis and presentation in a digital format.

The Digital History Projects Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England Register registration required at no cost 28 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Mutschler, Oregon State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/winter_2021/province_of_affliction.jpg

Afflictions of all sorts coursed through eighteenth-century New England – towns and cities set ablaze by epidemics, soldiers sickened and injured in the fight for empire, families and households laboring under an astonishing range of sufferings that were at once common and costly. This session will bring Ben Mutschler, author of The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England (Chicago, 2020), together with Liz Covart, podcast host of Ben Franklin’s World, to discuss how the early modern world addressed issues at once strange and familiar to us all.

Get 20% off the list price when you order Province of Affliction through UChicago Press using code BEN20 at checkout. 

 

 

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Online Event, Author Talk, Public Program Driving While Black: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights Register registration required at no cost 1 February 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Gretchen Sorin, SUNY Oneonta in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/driving_while_black.jpg

Driving While Black demonstrates that the car—the ultimate symbol of independence and possibility— has always held particular importance for African Americans, allowing black families to evade the Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/61Aq3gMhSWL.jpg
dangers presented by an entrenched racist society and to enjoy, in some measure, the freedom of the open road. Melding new archival research with her family’s story, Gretchen Sorin recovers a lost history, demonstrating how, when combined with black travel guides—including the famous Green Book—the automobile encouraged a new way of resisting oppression.

 

 

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Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics Register registration required at no cost 2 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Higher Laws: Black and White Transcendentalists and the Fight Against Slavery Register registration required at no cost 4 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/higher_laws.jpg

In the cauldron of the antislavery movement, antislavery activists and Transcendentalist intellectuals, developed a "Higher Law" ethos, a unique set of romantic political sensibilities—marked by moral enthusiasms, democratic idealism, and a vision of the self that could judge political questions from "higher" standards of morality and reason. The Transcendentalism that emerges here was intended to fight slavery, but it would influence later labor, feminist, civil rights, and environmentalist activism. African American thinkers and activists have long engaged with American Transcendentalist ideas about "double consciousness," nonconformity, and civil disobedience. When thinkers like Martin Luther King, Jr., or W. E. B. Du Bois invoked Transcendentalist ideas, they were putting to use an intellectual movement that black radicals had participated in since the 1830s.

 

 

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Online Event Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony Register registration required at no cost 9 February 2021.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This is an online event. Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/gomes_banner.jpg

Please join us for a special evening in which historian Kerri Greenidge will receive the 2020 Gomes Prize for Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter. Greenidge will join Annette Gordon-Reed in a conversation about Trotter’s pursuit of radical equality and Black self-determination, as well as the multilayered world of Black Boston that was not simply an abolitionist haven for former slaves but a segregated world with limited opportunity for even a Harvard-educated man like Trotter.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution Register registration required at no cost 11 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program James Oakes, The Graduate Center, CUNY in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/crooked_path.jpg

Some celebrate Lincoln for freeing the slaves; others fault him for a long-standing conservatism on abolition and race. James Oakes provides another exploration of Lincoln and the end of slavery. Through the unforeseen challenges of the Civil War crisis, Lincoln and the Republican party adhered to a clear antislavery strategy founded on the Constitution itself. Lincoln and the Republicans claimed strong constitutional tools for federal action against slavery, and they used those tools consistently to undermine slavery, prevent its expansion, and pressure the slave states into abolition. This antislavery Constitution guided Lincoln and his allies as they navigated the sectional crisis and the Civil War. When the states finally ratified the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, it was a confirmation of a long-held vision.

 

 

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Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Boston Women on Drugs Register registration required at no cost 16 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM Trysh Travis, University of Florida Elizabeth Lunbeck, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

In the mid-20th century, Boston emerged as a laboratory for “the modern alcoholism movement,” a campaign to replace penal responses to chronic drunkenness with medico-moral treatment focused on returning white men to their appropriate breadwinner roles. In the late 1970s, radical feminist and women of color community health activists in Boston and Cambridge critiqued this system. This paper examines their attempts to create a more equitable, responsive, and genuinely feminist approach to substance abuse, and assesses their strengths and shortcomings.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Confronting Racial Injustice: Slavery, Wealth Creation, and Intergenerational Wealth Register registration required at no cost 18 February 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Nicole Maskiell, University of South Carolina; Elon Cook Lee, National Trust for Historic Preservation; moderated by Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University This program is in partnership with Northeastern University Law School's Criminal Justice Task Force

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, slavery has been central to creating wealth and generating race-based inequality in Massachusetts. Family fortunes, institutional endowments, and public budgets in the commonwealth have all benefitted from the spoils of slavery. This panel discussion between academic and public historians explores Massachusetts’s connections to slavery and the slave trade, the wealth -- and the poverty -- slavery created and bequeathed, and how the legacies of slavery are reflected in injustices that haunt Massachusetts to this day.

 

 

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Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar A Portal to the Pacific Ocean: Puget Sound, the Transcontinental Railroads, and Transpacific Trade, 1869–1914 Register registration required at no cost 23 February 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Sean Fraga, University of Southern California David Armitage, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

The transcontinental railroads reshaped the United States—its politics, economy, culture and environment. But as Sean Fraga argues, these railroads also saw themselves as part of an emergent global steam-powered network. This paper shows how American interest in trade with East Asia motivated Northern Pacific Railway and Great Northern Railway to build transcontinental lines to Puget Sound. In doing so, these railroads left lasting impacts on the region’s lands, waters, and peoples.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Threat of Dissent: A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States Register registration required at no cost 24 February 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Julia Rose Kraut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/service-pnp-det-4a20000-4a28000-4a28600-4a28681v.jpg

Beginning with the Alien Friends Act of 1798, the United States passed laws in the name of national Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9780674976061_p0_v1_s1200x630.jpgsecurity to bar or expel foreigners based on their beliefs and associations—although these laws sometimes conflict with First Amendment protections of freedom of speech and association or contradict America’s self-image as a nation of immigrants. The government has continually used ideological exclusions and deportations of noncitizens to suppress dissent and radicalism throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from the War on Anarchy to the Cold War to the War on Terror. In Threat of Dissent, Julia Rose Kraut provides a comprehensive overview of the intersection of immigration law and the First Amendment.

 

 

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Protest and Citizenship: Revisited Register registration required at no cost 25 February 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Stephen Kantrowitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Crystal Feimster, Yale University; Chad Williams, Brandeis University; Hasan Jeffries, Ohio State University

Collective protest, in addition to being a constitutionally protected right, is a fundamental and enduring part of American life and culture. Protest and agitation has at times proven a powerful way of advancing the rights and status of marginalized groups by swaying public opinion and fueling changes in law and public policy. Our panel of scholars will revisit an earlier conversation held in 2018, looking at the ways in which protest has been used to highlight injustice and change the citizenship rights of certain groups. In the wake of the high-profile demonstrations triggered by the murder of George Floyd, what can we take from the past to understand our current political and social climate?

 

 

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Online Event, Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Health, Disease, and Early American Environments - A Panel Discussion Register registration required 2 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Molly Nebiolo, Northeastern University; Camden Elliott, Harvard University Comment: Thomas Wickman, Trinity College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast new light on key sites of Colonial American history. Molly Nebiolo’s research highlights how health and medical knowledge impacted the creation of early Atlantic cities. By examining the colonial history of promotional narratives, both written and spatial, her paper argues that health and well-being were fundamental ideas for the settlement of Philadelphia and Charleston. Camden Elliott’s paper recasts the history of the Stono Slave Rebellion through the lens of environmental history. Placing mosquitoes (and their pathogens) in a supporting role to a slave war in South Carolina, he investigates how yellow fever helped set the stage for resistance and malaria shielded maroons in the rebellion’s aftermath.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Strange Genius of Mr. O: The World of the United States' First Forgotten Celebrity Register registration required at no cost 3 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University, in conversation with Sara Georgini, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/81hYYRIc6qL.jpg

When James Ogilvie arrived in America in 1793, he was a deeply ambitious but impoverished teacher. By the time he returned to Britain in 1817, he had become a bona fide celebrity known simply as Mr. O, counting the nation's leading politicians and intellectuals among his admirers. And then, like so many meteoric American luminaries afterward, he fell from grace. Ogilvie's career featured many of the hallmarks of celebrity we recognize from later eras: glamorous friends, eccentric clothing, scandalous religious views, narcissism, and even an alarming drug habit. Author Caroyln Eastman, along with Sara Georgini, will discuss Ogilvie’s history, which is at once a biography of a remarkable performer and a story of the United States during the founding era.

 

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Online Event, Seminar, African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation Register registration required at no cost 4 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Online Event, Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs Register registration required at no cost 9 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs,1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine different archives or libraries. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Public Program, Online Event, Conversation From Revolution to Pandemic: What Makes Boston One of the World’s Top Innovation Centers? Register registration required at no cost 24 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Robert Krim in conversation with Scott Kirsner Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9781623545352.jpg

Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that Changed the World, presents a fascinating journey through Boston’s innovation history. Looking at the range of Boston-born innovations that, over its 400-year history, have made Boston one of the world’s leading cities in innovation, Dr. Krim answers the question of why the city has remained innovative through its long history. He will describe in colorful detail the struggles the city—and its innovators—faced on their road to innovations which changed the nation or the world and will discuss how this unfettered innovative culture has helped the city reinvent itself after four devastating economic collapses.

 

 

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Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Marriage of Minds or Boston Divorce? The lives and good works of Caroline Healey Dall and Rev. Charles Henry Appleton Dall on two continents Register registration required at no cost 25 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Neilesh Bose, University of Victorial; Helen R. Deese, Caroline Healey Dall Editor, Massachusetts Historical Society Moderator: Megan Marshall, Emerson College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg

Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as a teenager in Margaret Fuller’s Conversations, Caroline learned to ask “all the great questions of life.” The handsome but sickly Charles graduated from Harvard with Henry Thoreau and was influenced by Joseph Tuckerman’s ministry to the poor. Marrying in 1844, the couple struggled to find their footing as Charles took a series of ministerial jobs, each punctuated by a period of illness. When Charles left Caroline and their two children in 1855 to establish a Unitarian mission in Calcutta, drawn to the Brahmo Samaj and the Indian nationalist cause, his health improved. “Separated by half the earth,” historian Spencer Lavan writes, “their careers began to blossom.” Caroline emerged as a vehement writer and lecturer on abolition, women’s rights, and social science. Bose and Deese will effect a 21st-century reconciliation, putting into conversation a couple whose divergence led to lives of distinctive activism, documented in Caroline’s extensive journals held at the MHS.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Parlor and the Public: Tin Pan Alley and the Birth of Manhattan Mass Culture Register registration required at no cost 30 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Samuel Backer, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Jeffrey Melnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a revolutionary approach to publishing, constructing a system able to sell songs at a previously unimaginable scale and rate. Relying on New York’s central role in national performance networks to disseminate their compositions, this industry was defined by the tension between publishers’ attempts to create mass-marketing commodities, and the fast-moving, alcohol-drenched urban environments in which their products were required to thrive.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South Register registration required at no cost 1 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Tyler Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, Environmental History Seminar, Online Event Kaleidoscope Metropolis: Autonomy and Integration in the Fractured City Register registration required at no cost 13 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Garrett Nelson, Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan problems demanded municipal consolidation, meaningful regional integration became a political dead letter. This paper examines how conflicting pressures towards both spatial integration and disintegration shaped the postwar city, with ecological concepts about environmental management jostling against demands for community autonomy coming from both right and left. Struggle over geographic units thereby became a key axis of conflict between different ideological strands of the politics of place.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century Register registration required at no cost 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography Register registration required at no cost 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher Register registration required at no cost 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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