Education of Henry Adams

The Education of Henry Adams: A Centennial Version


Cover of Education of Henry Adams: Centennial EditionEdited by Edward Chalfant and Conrad Edick Wright
542 pages, 7 x 10 (2007)
Distributed by the University of Virginia Press
$34.95 cloth    ISBN: 978-0-934-909-91-4
Paper · 542 pp. · 7 x 10 · ISBN 9780934909938 · $19.95 · Aug 2008

Both a winner of the Pulitzer Prize and at the head of the Modern Library's list of the 100 best English-language nonfiction books of the 20th century, The Education of Henry Adams has long been revered as a great work of literature. Written by Adams in the third person, the book became known for founding a new genre best described as "an education"—an account not of life, but of learning. A tireless historian, politician, and traveler, Adams was from first to last a dedicated learner capable of great originality.

Although The Education of Henry Adams has long been considered a classic, until now the only editions available were those from 1907 and 1918. The former, which appeared in Adams's lifetime, was a private printing of only 100 copies, containing hundreds of printer's errors and editorial inconsistencies. The latter, printed by the Massachusetts Historical Society and Houghton Mifflin Company after Adams's death in March of 1918, amounted to a wholesale modernization of Adams's work, leaving telling defects, including stylistic inconsistencies and incomplete sentences. With The Education of Henry Adams: A Centennial Version, editors Edward Chalfant and Conrad Edick Wright have at long last returned this celebrated book to the author's vision. Combining close attention to the private printing's typesetting and editorial shortcomings with valuable insights into the history of the book and Adams's reasons for writing it, they have also inserted marginal corrections by Adams in his working copies of the 1907 printing. With an introductory note, an invitation to readers, and a postscript, they have both traced the text's own story and offered a compelling interpretation of the author's motives.

Edward Chalfant is a Professor of English Emeritus at Hofstra University and the author of a trilogy on the life of Henry Adams: Both Sides of the Ocean; Better in Darkness; and Improvement of the World. Conrad Edick Wright is the Ford Editor of Publications at the Massachusetts Historical Society, where he has been on staff since 1985. He is the author or coauthor of three books, the editor or coeditor of seven collections of essays, and the project director for Sibley's Harvard Graduates and Colonial Collegians: Biographies of Those Who Attended American Colleges before the War for Independence.

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