January

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Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 15 January 2018.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

More
Environmental History Seminar The Fight before the Flood: Rural Protest and the Debate over Boston’s Quabbin Reservoir, 1919-1927 16 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Jeffrey Egan, University of Connecticut Comment: Karl Haglund, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation In 1919, state engineers proposed solving Boston’s water supply crisis by damming the Swift ...

In 1919, state engineers proposed solving Boston’s water supply crisis by damming the Swift River, flooding a western Massachusetts valley and evicting 2,500 people. The contentious six-year debate that followed does not fit the standard story of urban conservationists versus rural peoples, as many valley residents defined themselves as rural and conservationist, and thus offers scholars a chance to see fresh nuances in early twentieth-century land management, rural life, and urban development.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag Skulls, Selves, and Showmanship: Itinerant Phrenologists in 19th-Century America 17 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathrinne Duffy, Brown University "Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist ...

"Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist advertised his lecture to the public. Proponents of phrenology — a controversial, influential science — believed that the shape of one’s cranium revealed one’s character. This talk explores the world of phrenological lecture-demonstrations and the circulation of materialist ideas about the self.

More
History of Women and Gender Seminar The ‘Woman Inventor’ as a Political Tool of Female Suffragists: Patents, Invention, and Civil Rights in the Nineteenth-Century United States 23 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:45PM RSVP required Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Kara Swanson, Northeastern University School of Law Comment: Rebecca Herzig, Bates College After the Patent Act of 1790, patents played an important social and political role in the ...

After the Patent Act of 1790, patents played an important social and political role in the formation of American nationhood and citizenship. Part of a larger book project, this paper demonstrates how nineteenth-century American women mobilized patents granted to women as justification for civil rights claims. It identifies the creation of the “woman inventor” as a cultural trope and political weapon of resistance.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar “Momentum Toward Evil is Strong”: Poor Women, Moral Panics, and the Rise of Crime-Fighting Policing in Depression-Era America 30 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Anne Gray Fischer, Brown University Comment: Michael Willrich, Brandeis University Between Prohibition and World War II, American law enforcement went from being seen as a brutal and ...

Between Prohibition and World War II, American law enforcement went from being seen as a brutal and incompetent political liability to a professional crime-fighting regime. This essay explores the dramatic shift in public perception by studying the changing practices of Depression-era morality policing in Boston and Los Angeles—specifically, the police enforcement of morals misdemeanors, including vagrancy, disorderly conduct, lewdness, and prostitution, which disproportionately targeted poor women on city streets.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag Indian Doctresses: Race, Labor, and Medicine in the 19th-century United States 31 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Angela Hudson, Texas A&M University This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care ...

This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care. The study strives to more fully integrate indigeneity into fields of study from which it is often absent, most notably labor history and the history of medicine.

More
February
Early American History Seminar The Category of Disability in Colonial America 6 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Laurel Daen, MHS-NEH Fellow Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut From 1790 to 1840, disability emerged as a legal, institutional, and cultural category in the ...

From 1790 to 1840, disability emerged as a legal, institutional, and cultural category in the United States, used for both social welfare and exclusion. The market for disability-related products and services boomed. This increasingly standardized and medicalized category of disability sheds new light on questions of citizenship, state formation, market growth, medicine, and social belonging, while also exposing the deep intersections of disability and American nation-building.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Environmental History Seminar Governor Francis W. Sargent: Fisheries Manager 13 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Benjamin Kochan, Boston University Comment: Brian Payne, Bridgewater State University Francis Sargent was a Cape Cod fisherman. Fishing brought him into the government as Director of ...

Francis Sargent was a Cape Cod fisherman. Fishing brought him into the government as Director of Fisheries, then head of Public Works, and, eventually, governor of Massachusetts. In his positions, Sargent bridged the gap between working-class fishers and government. This paper examines Sargent’s ability to speak directly to fishermen, arguing that his post-1974 disengagement from public life robbed fishermen of an ally who might have soothed tensions created by late-1970s federal regulations.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Building Closed Presidents Day 19 February 2018.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents Day. 

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents Day. 

More
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Panel Discussion: Capitalism and Culture 27 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Jonathan Cohen, University of Virginia, and Davor Mondom, Syracuse University Comment: Sven Beckert, Harvard University This panel examines the reaction against welfare state capitalism in the mid-20th century U.S., ...

This panel examines the reaction against welfare state capitalism in the mid-20th century U.S., looking at two companies that promoted themselves as bastions of free enterprise or as a solution to high state taxes. Mondom’s paper is “Capitalism with a Human Face: Amway, Direct Sales, and the Redemption of Free Enterprise.” Cohen’s essay is titled “Rivers of Gold: Scientific Games and the Spread of State Lotteries, 1980-1984.”

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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March
Early American History Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Panel Discussion: Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Study of Early America 6 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Christopher Pastore, State University of New York at Albany; Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut; Conevery Valencius, Boston College Moderator: TBD This panel takes the opportunity to bring the fields of environmental and early American history ...

This panel takes the opportunity to bring the fields of environmental and early American history into closer conversation. Environmental historians are concerned with concepts such as ecological imperialism and non-anthropocentric empires, built and natural environments, controlling and organizing space, and the relationship between borders and frontiers. How does or might this influence scholarship on early America? How can work on early American history enrich environmental historians’ understanding of empire, metropoles and borderlands, movement and colonization?

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Teacher Workshop Monuments & Historical Memory 17 March 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of ...

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity. We will discuss examples of monuments and memorials ranging from early American history to the Holocaust, and will engage with the current controversy over the role of Confederate monuments and memorials in communities across the US.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


More
History of Women and Gender Seminar On Fantasy 20 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM RSVP required Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University, and Emily Owens, Brown University Comment: Jasmine Johnson, Brown University This paper argues that fantasies of racial and gendered mastery—seen in law, racial ...

This paper argues that fantasies of racial and gendered mastery—seen in law, racial performance, and sexual violence—were important world-making tools in the nineteenth century. It looks at how white supremacist fantasies took shape in the courtroom and in blackface dramas, what their impact was, and how historians might begin to find and examine these fantasies in the archives.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Biography Seminar “No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects 22 March 2018.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM RSVP required Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is ...

Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is not documented with words. Mute sources—objects in the subject’s archive—can pose a challenge for interpretation, but also offer rich opportunities. How can biographers read objects as eloquent sources?

Panelists include Deborah Lutz, whose book The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects is a biography of the sisters centered on the humble objects they owned. Susan Ware, author of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports, is using artifacts from the Schlesinger Library’s collections in her group biography of suffrage activists. Karen Sanchez-Eppler is writing In the Archives of Childhood: Playing with the Past, viewing children’s lives from material things. Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, will moderate.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar La Villanía Arizoniana: Disenfranchisement, Citizenship, and Defining the Body Politic in the Early Twentieth Century US-Mexico Borderlands 27 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College Comment: Alex Keyssar, Harvard Kennedy School In 1909 and 1912, the Arizona legislature enacted requirements that all voters be literate in ...

In 1909 and 1912, the Arizona legislature enacted requirements that all voters be literate in English, sparking a storm of multilingual protests in the papers and the courts. How and why Anglo-Arizonans took the right to vote from thousands of Mexican-American men and how Spanish-speakers fought back shows how conflicting views of race and ethnicity have influenced citizenship in the U.S.’s southwestern borderlands.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
April
Early American History Seminar Terror Twice Told: Popular Conventions, Political Violence, and the Coming of the Constitutional Crisis, 1780-1787 3 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Brendan McConville, Boston University Comment: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut As the revolutionary war ended, members of committees, conventions and other extraordinary ...

As the revolutionary war ended, members of committees, conventions and other extraordinary revolutionary institutions continued to operate as independent political actors. Between 1781 and at least 1786, committeemen and conventioneers launched forceful, violent efforts to reengineer American society. Committee-directed mobs expelled “tories” from many communities, and committeemen and conventioneers used both local laws and contract theory to legitimate these expulsions. This paper argues that the wave of political violence after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781 ultimately reflected conflicts within the American political community over who could be an American, what institutions constituted “the people” in a republic, and the character and limits of the “the people’s” power to form self-governing institutions. These disputes played an important role in creating the 1787 constitutional crisis.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Yankees in the West Exhibitionends Yankees in the West 6 April 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 12:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM For generations Americans have been fascinated with the American west. Depictions of the western ...

For generations Americans have been fascinated with the American west. Depictions of the western landscape flooded New England in the mid19th century, spurring a stream of western tourism. Yankees in the West draws from the Society's collections of letters, diaries, photographs, drawings, and artifacts to explore the ways New Englanders experienced the trans-Mississippi west in the late19th and early 20th centuries.

More
Environmental History Seminar The Ice Trade: Frederic Tudor’s “Slippery Speculation” 10 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Andrew Robichaud, Boston University Comment: David Spanagel, Worcester Polytechnic Institute This paper reexamines the emergence and development of the ice trade in Boston and North America, ...

This paper reexamines the emergence and development of the ice trade in Boston and North America, described in 1806 by the Boston Gazette as a “slippery speculation.” What can the ice trade tell us about environmental, economic, political, and spatial change in nineteenth-century Boston and North America?

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
More events
Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 15 January 2018.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Fight before the Flood: Rural Protest and the Debate over Boston’s Quabbin Reservoir, 1919-1927 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
16 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jeffrey Egan, University of Connecticut Comment: Karl Haglund, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation

In 1919, state engineers proposed solving Boston’s water supply crisis by damming the Swift River, flooding a western Massachusetts valley and evicting 2,500 people. The contentious six-year debate that followed does not fit the standard story of urban conservationists versus rural peoples, as many valley residents defined themselves as rural and conservationist, and thus offers scholars a chance to see fresh nuances in early twentieth-century land management, rural life, and urban development.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Brown Bag Skulls, Selves, and Showmanship: Itinerant Phrenologists in 19th-Century America this event is free 17 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathrinne Duffy, Brown University

"Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist advertised his lecture to the public. Proponents of phrenology — a controversial, influential science — believed that the shape of one’s cranium revealed one’s character. This talk explores the world of phrenological lecture-demonstrations and the circulation of materialist ideas about the self.

close
History of Women and Gender Seminar The ‘Woman Inventor’ as a Political Tool of Female Suffragists: Patents, Invention, and Civil Rights in the Nineteenth-Century United States Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
23 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:45PM Location: Massachusetts Historical Society Kara Swanson, Northeastern University School of Law Comment: Rebecca Herzig, Bates College

After the Patent Act of 1790, patents played an important social and political role in the formation of American nationhood and citizenship. Part of a larger book project, this paper demonstrates how nineteenth-century American women mobilized patents granted to women as justification for civil rights claims. It identifies the creation of the “woman inventor” as a cultural trope and political weapon of resistance.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar “Momentum Toward Evil is Strong”: Poor Women, Moral Panics, and the Rise of Crime-Fighting Policing in Depression-Era America Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
30 January 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Anne Gray Fischer, Brown University Comment: Michael Willrich, Brandeis University

Between Prohibition and World War II, American law enforcement went from being seen as a brutal and incompetent political liability to a professional crime-fighting regime. This essay explores the dramatic shift in public perception by studying the changing practices of Depression-era morality policing in Boston and Los Angeles—specifically, the police enforcement of morals misdemeanors, including vagrancy, disorderly conduct, lewdness, and prostitution, which disproportionately targeted poor women on city streets.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Brown Bag Indian Doctresses: Race, Labor, and Medicine in the 19th-century United States this event is free 31 January 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Angela Hudson, Texas A&M University

This project focuses on women who worked as Indian doctresses and the clients who sought their care. The study strives to more fully integrate indigeneity into fields of study from which it is often absent, most notably labor history and the history of medicine.

close
Early American History Seminar The Category of Disability in Colonial America Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
6 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Laurel Daen, MHS-NEH Fellow Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut

From 1790 to 1840, disability emerged as a legal, institutional, and cultural category in the United States, used for both social welfare and exclusion. The market for disability-related products and services boomed. This increasingly standardized and medicalized category of disability sheds new light on questions of citizenship, state formation, market growth, medicine, and social belonging, while also exposing the deep intersections of disability and American nation-building.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Environmental History Seminar Governor Francis W. Sargent: Fisheries Manager Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
13 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Benjamin Kochan, Boston University Comment: Brian Payne, Bridgewater State University

Francis Sargent was a Cape Cod fisherman. Fishing brought him into the government as Director of Fisheries, then head of Public Works, and, eventually, governor of Massachusetts. In his positions, Sargent bridged the gap between working-class fishers and government. This paper examines Sargent’s ability to speak directly to fishermen, arguing that his post-1974 disengagement from public life robbed fishermen of an ally who might have soothed tensions created by late-1970s federal regulations.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Building Closed Presidents Day 19 February 2018.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Presidents Day. 

close
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Panel Discussion: Capitalism and Culture Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
27 February 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jonathan Cohen, University of Virginia, and Davor Mondom, Syracuse University Comment: Sven Beckert, Harvard University

This panel examines the reaction against welfare state capitalism in the mid-20th century U.S., looking at two companies that promoted themselves as bastions of free enterprise or as a solution to high state taxes. Mondom’s paper is “Capitalism with a Human Face: Amway, Direct Sales, and the Redemption of Free Enterprise.” Cohen’s essay is titled “Rivers of Gold: Scientific Games and the Spread of State Lotteries, 1980-1984.”

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Early American History Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Panel Discussion: Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Study of Early America Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
6 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Pastore, State University of New York at Albany; Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut; Conevery Valencius, Boston College Moderator: TBD

This panel takes the opportunity to bring the fields of environmental and early American history into closer conversation. Environmental historians are concerned with concepts such as ecological imperialism and non-anthropocentric empires, built and natural environments, controlling and organizing space, and the relationship between borders and frontiers. How does or might this influence scholarship on early America? How can work on early American history enrich environmental historians’ understanding of empire, metropoles and borderlands, movement and colonization?

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Teacher Workshop Monuments & Historical Memory Please RSVP   registration required 17 March 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Who decides what should be remembered in public spaces? Is removing a monument the equivalent of erasing history, or should monuments change along with their communities? Join MHS in exploring how monuments and memorials can help students understand history, historical memory, and how national symbols play a critical role in articulating culture and identity. We will discuss examples of monuments and memorials ranging from early American history to the Holocaust, and will engage with the current controversy over the role of Confederate monuments and memorials in communities across the US.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee).

Image: Dedication of the Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, Boston, 31 May 1897, albumen print.

Highlights:

  • Explore WWII and Holocaust commemoration across the globe 
  • Learn about the history of Confederate monuments in America: When were they erected? Who built them? What do they signify? 
  • Discuss ways to engage students in conversation on current national debates over Confederate symbols in public spaces
  • View and analyze documents and artifacts from the Society's collections


close
History of Women and Gender Seminar On Fantasy Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
20 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University, and Emily Owens, Brown University Comment: Jasmine Johnson, Brown University

This paper argues that fantasies of racial and gendered mastery—seen in law, racial performance, and sexual violence—were important world-making tools in the nineteenth century. It looks at how white supremacist fantasies took shape in the courtroom and in blackface dramas, what their impact was, and how historians might begin to find and examine these fantasies in the archives.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Biography Seminar “No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
22 March 2018.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College

Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is not documented with words. Mute sources—objects in the subject’s archive—can pose a challenge for interpretation, but also offer rich opportunities. How can biographers read objects as eloquent sources?

Panelists include Deborah Lutz, whose book The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects is a biography of the sisters centered on the humble objects they owned. Susan Ware, author of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports, is using artifacts from the Schlesinger Library’s collections in her group biography of suffrage activists. Karen Sanchez-Eppler is writing In the Archives of Childhood: Playing with the Past, viewing children’s lives from material things. Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, will moderate.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar La Villanía Arizoniana: Disenfranchisement, Citizenship, and Defining the Body Politic in the Early Twentieth Century US-Mexico Borderlands Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
27 March 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College Comment: Alex Keyssar, Harvard Kennedy School

In 1909 and 1912, the Arizona legislature enacted requirements that all voters be literate in English, sparking a storm of multilingual protests in the papers and the courts. How and why Anglo-Arizonans took the right to vote from thousands of Mexican-American men and how Spanish-speakers fought back shows how conflicting views of race and ethnicity have influenced citizenship in the U.S.’s southwestern borderlands.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Early American History Seminar Terror Twice Told: Popular Conventions, Political Violence, and the Coming of the Constitutional Crisis, 1780-1787 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
3 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Brendan McConville, Boston University Comment: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut

As the revolutionary war ended, members of committees, conventions and other extraordinary revolutionary institutions continued to operate as independent political actors. Between 1781 and at least 1786, committeemen and conventioneers launched forceful, violent efforts to reengineer American society. Committee-directed mobs expelled “tories” from many communities, and committeemen and conventioneers used both local laws and contract theory to legitimate these expulsions. This paper argues that the wave of political violence after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781 ultimately reflected conflicts within the American political community over who could be an American, what institutions constituted “the people” in a republic, and the character and limits of the “the people’s” power to form self-governing institutions. These disputes played an important role in creating the 1787 constitutional crisis.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close
Exhibition Yankees in the West this event is free 6 April 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 12:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Yankees in the West

For generations Americans have been fascinated with the American west. Depictions of the western landscape flooded New England in the mid19th century, spurring a stream of western tourism. Yankees in the West draws from the Society's collections of letters, diaries, photographs, drawings, and artifacts to explore the ways New Englanders experienced the trans-Mississippi west in the late19th and early 20th centuries.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Ice Trade: Frederic Tudor’s “Slippery Speculation” Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
10 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Andrew Robichaud, Boston University Comment: David Spanagel, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

This paper reexamines the emergence and development of the ice trade in Boston and North America, described in 1806 by the Boston Gazette as a “slippery speculation.” What can the ice trade tell us about environmental, economic, political, and spatial change in nineteenth-century Boston and North America?

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

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