July

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Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, ...

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

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Public Program Boston Historical Reception 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-event reception at 5:30 Hosted by Anita Walker, Mass Cultural Council There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of ...

There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of history organizations. Boston and surrounding towns are steeped in local history and the inhabitants are proud of their local identity. The MHS is pleased to hold a reception for history buffs and representatives of local organizations to mingle, share recent accomplishments, and talk about the great projects on which they are working.

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Brown Bag Notes on Phillis Wheatley: Prodigy, Poetics, and the Science of the Human, 1761-1800 13 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Camille Owens, Yale University This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing ...

This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing on Wheatley’s education as an enslaved child. It reconstructs Wheatley’s education in relation to early American philosophy and pedagogy of childhood, looking to primers, tract literature, and the influence of Locke. From there, it examines the often-cited (and likely fictionalized) “trials” of Phillis Wheatley—and to Jefferson’s Notes on Wheatley—to show the performance of authenticating and/or discrediting black intellect as a cultural tradition which Wheatley’s literary career inaugurated.

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JQA Transcribe-a-thon Special Event, Public Program JQA Transcribe-a-thon 14 July 2018.Saturday, 9:30AM - 3:00PM Celebrate John Quincy Adams's birthday at the second annual transcribe-a-thon! Immerse yourself in ...

JQA pages

Celebrate John Quincy Adams's birthday at the second annual transcribe-a-thon! Immerse yourself in JQA's diary and help the Adams Papers Editorial Project make more of his 15,000-page diary available online. 

While the ability to read handwriting is necessary, no transcription experience is required. Bring your laptop or use one of ours. Come for the day or pop in for a little while. All are welcome!

Lunch and light refreshments will be provided. Registration is free and open to the public. For more information, or to register, contact Gwen Fries: gfries@masshist.org; 617-646-0556. 

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Teacher Workshopbegins Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution 18 July 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different ...

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Public Program, Author Talk Back Bay through Time 19 July 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Anthony Sammarco There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th ...

Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th century but one that was infilled and planned as the premier residential and institutional development. in this photographic history of the Back Bay of Boston, Anthony M. Sammarco, with the contemporary photographs of Peter B. Kingman, has created a fascinating book that chronicles the neighborhood from the late 19th century through to today.

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Teacher Workshopends Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution 20 July 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different ...

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 21 July 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Public Program Gallery Talk: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End 21 July 2018.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clark Pearce Gallery Talk Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the ...

Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the exhibition’s highlights while giving deeper context to the life and work of two extraordinary Massachusetts craftsmen, Isaac Vose and Thomas Seymour.

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Brown Bag The End of War: The Wabanaki Struggle with New England, 1722-1727 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ian Saxine, Alfred University This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the ...

This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the conflict as the final resolution of a half-century of imperial crisis in the region. The talk argues the limits of indigenous, colonial, and imperial power influenced the war’s outbreak, the fighting, and its resolution.

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Public Program, Author Talk Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Paul Collins, Portland State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George ...

On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George Parkman, vanished. What resulted was a baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment on the grounds of Harvard Medical School. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster pioneered the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings 19th-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together accounts of one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.

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Teacher Workshopbegins Immigration Policy in American History 26 July 2018.Thursday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $35 per person This workshop has been POSTPONED.  We will post further information here when it is ...

This workshop has been POSTPONED.  We will post further information here when it is rescheduled. 

The Society holds a wealth of material to contextualize contemporary debates over immigration. From Irish immigration to Boston and the parallel Know-Nothing movement, the Progressive Era and efforts to “Americanize” immigrants, to debates over immigration restriction in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, we will explore the roots of current immigration policies and their legacy in politics today.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Teacher Workshopends Immigration Policy in American History 27 July 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $35 per person This workshop has been POSTPONED.  We will post further information here when it is ...

This workshop has been POSTPONED.  We will post further information here when it is rescheduled. 

The Society holds a wealth of material to contextualize contemporary debates over immigration. From Irish immigration to Boston and the parallel Know-Nothing movement, the Progressive Era and efforts to “Americanize” immigrants, to debates over immigration restriction in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, we will explore the roots of current immigration policies and their legacy in politics today.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Brown Bag Maroon Ecologies: Albery Allson Whitman and the Place of Poetry 27 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine McIntyre, Columbia University This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The ...

This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The Rape of Florida through an analysis of colonial cartographic practices. Using maps to examine the cartographic representation of swamps and other wetlands that permeate the boundary between land and water, this talk opens questions about the porous ecologies of maroon communities and the poetics that follow from such ecologies.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 28 July 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag The Heterodox Atlantic: Italian Heretics in Early America 30 July 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Diego Pirillo, University of California, Berkeley This talk presents the initial findings of a new project on religious radicalism in early America, ...

This talk presents the initial findings of a new project on religious radicalism in early America, which aims at recovering the transatlantic legacy of Italian Protestantism. Focusing on 17th- and 18th-century New England, the talk examines discussions on religious migration and liberty of conscience.

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August
Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever ...

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag Sensory Experiences of Daily Life at New England Hospitals for the Insane 6 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Madeline Kearin, Brown University Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were ...

Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were originally envisioned as “technological marvels” that would solve the national mental health crisis. This talk examines how New England lunatic hospitals were designed to mobilize sensory experience to cure mental illness, and how these designs shaped patient experiences.

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Teacher Workshopbegins The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here ...

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in ...

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

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Teacher Workshopends The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy 10 August 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here ...

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Brown Bag Postponed: "The Shade of Private Life": The Right to Privacy and the Press in American Art, 1875-1900 10 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicole Williams, Yale University This brown bag is postponed to a later date. This talk considers how American ...

This brown bag is postponed to a later date.

This talk considers how American artists at the close of the nineteenth century advanced a new, modern notion of privacy in response to the rise of tabloid journalism and the emergence of invasive reporting genres like the gossip column and the personal exposé. It examines a diverse series of paintings, sculptures, and photographs in relation to period critiques of the press and the emerging legal concept of "the right to privacy."

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 11 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Teacher Workshopbegins Canceled: Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person   This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here ...

 

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Teacher Workshopends Canceled: Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights 17 August 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $50 per person   This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here ...

 

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how ...

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

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Teacher Workshopbegins Canceled: Education: Equality and Access 23 August 2018.Thursday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $35 per person  This workshop has been POSTPONED.  Further information will be posted here when it is ...

 This workshop has been POSTPONED.  Further information will be posted here when it is rescheduled.

This program will investigate the history of education access in Massachusetts and the United States, with a particular focus on access to education for African American students. Participants will learn more about Massachusetts residents who influenced national education policies, Massachusetts court cases that changed the course of national education policy, and the legacy of segregation and desegregation practices that impact Massachusetts schools to this day.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Teacher Workshopends Canceled: Education: Equality and Access 24 August 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $35 per person  This workshop has been POSTPONED.  Further information will be posted here when it is ...

 This workshop has been POSTPONED.  Further information will be posted here when it is rescheduled.

This program will investigate the history of education access in Massachusetts and the United States, with a particular focus on access to education for African American students. Participants will learn more about Massachusetts residents who influenced national education policies, Massachusetts court cases that changed the course of national education policy, and the legacy of segregation and desegregation practices that impact Massachusetts schools to this day.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the ...

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag The Missionary Republic: American Evangelicals and the Birth of Modern Missions 27 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Thomas Whittaker, Harvard University The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain ...

The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain, the United States, and continental Europe. This talk explains why Americans bought into the missions movement and how they domesticated it within a republican vision of civilization building on the frontier.

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Brown Bag Masters of the Market: Ship Captaincy in the Colonial British Atlantic 31 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Hannah Tucker, University of Virginia During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in ...

During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in markets far from the owners’ direct oversight. This talk explores why the economic services ship captains provided transformed as the Atlantic trading economy became more complex, capital intensive, and informed in the eighteenth century.

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September
Building Closed Labor Day 1 September 2018.Saturday, all day The Society is CLOSED on Saturday, 1 September, for Labor Day.

The Society is CLOSED on Saturday, 1 September, for Labor Day.

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Building Closed Labor Day 3 September 2018.Monday, all day The Society is CLOSED in observance of Labor Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 4 September.

The Society is CLOSED in observance of Labor Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 4 September.

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Brown Bag Garrisonian Rhode Island: Reassessing Abolitionism’s Radicals 5 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Vrevich, Ohio State University This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s &ldquo ...

This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s “radical” abolitionism, in the larger antislavery network. As historians of abolitionism increasingly focus on continuities within the movement, Rhode Island offers an opportunity to reassess the place of the Garrisonians and to reconsider their contributions.

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Public Program, Conversation 100 Years of Educating Henry Adams 6 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Natalie Dykstra, Hope College; William Decker, Oklahoma State University; and Natalie Taylor, Skidmore College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Henry Adams offers an account of his life and commentary on political and cultural events during the ...

Henry Adams offers an account of his life and commentary on political and cultural events during the mid and late 19th century in the Pulitzer Prize–winning autobiography The Education of Henry Adams. Join us to mark the centenary of both Adams’s death and the Education’s publication with a critical conversation on Adams and his best known work.

 

 

 

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Brown Bag American Silver, Chinese Silverwares, and the Global Circulation of Value 7 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Susan Eberhard, University of California, Berkeley Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth ...

Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, some of which was reworked into silverwares by Chinese craftsmen for British and American buyers. This talk explores the different silver conduits of the American trade relationship with China. Far from a neutral medium, how were understandings of its materiality mobilized in cross-cultural transactions?

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 8 September 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

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Brown Bag “This Summer-Home of the Survivors”: The Civil War Vacation in Architecture & Landscape, 1878-1910 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM C. Ian Stevenson, Boston University In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront ...

In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront locations to merge memory and leisure among their comrades and families. Through interdisciplinary lenses, this talk considers the ways veterans used architecture and landscape to heal their wartime trauma and preserve their scripted legacy.

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Public Program, Author Talk Boston's Massacre 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Eric Hinderaker , University of Utah There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Boston&rsquo ...

On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpgBoston’s Custom House, killing five people. Denounced as an act of unprovoked violence and villainy, the Boston Massacre became one of the most familiar incidents in American history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining in forensic detail the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions at the time, and the long campaign to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

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Isaac Vose Couch Exhibitionends Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825 14 September 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new ...

Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new exhibition and accompanying volume. Beginning with a modest pair of collection boxes he made for his localBoston church in 1788, Vose went on to build a substantial business empire and to make furniture for the most prominent Boston families. The exhibition and catalog restore Vose from relative obscurity to his rightful position as one of Boston’s most important craftsmen. Opening at the MHS on May 11, the exhibition will be on view through September 14.

The complementary book, Rather Elegant Than Showy (May 2018), by Robert Mussey and Clark Pearce, will be available for sale at the MHS.

Image: Couch, Isaac Vose & Son, with Thomas Wightman, carver, Boston, 1824. Historic New England, Gift of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1923.507); photograph by David Bohl.

 

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Brown Bag A Possible Connection between a Scandal and Susanna Rowson's Last Novel 14 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Steven Epley, Samford University The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author ...

The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author Susanna Rowson may have based her last novel, Lucy Temple, at least in part on a scandal in which she was innocently but indirectly involved in Medford, Mass., in 1799.

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Public Program, Author Talk If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection 18 September 2018.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Edinburgh There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Bringing to light previously unpublished manuscript letters, essays, speeches, and photographs from ...

Bringing to light previously unpublished manuscript letters, essays, speeches, and photographs from Frederick Douglass and his sons, Charles Remond, Frederick Jr., and Lewis Henry Douglass, If I Survive casts Douglass in the role of dedicated family man and inspirational figure to his five children. This family biography as accompanied by these personal documents comprises the first extensive study of Frederick Douglass and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the post-emancipation era.

 

 

 

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Special Event Graduate Student Reception 20 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Calling all graduate students and faculty in history, American Studies, or any related field! Please ...

Calling all graduate students and faculty in history, American Studies, or any related field! Please join us for our ninth annual Graduate Student Reception.

 

Starting at six pm, you can enjoy free drinks and hors d’oeuvres as you meet students and professors from other universities working in your fields. At 6:30 or a little later, set down your glass and take a behind-the-scenes tour to learn more about the Society's collections as well as the resources available to support your scholarship, from research fellowships to our six different seminar series.

 

Faculty, bring your graduate students! Graduate students, bring your cohort! This reception is free, but we ask that you RSVP by September 19, by emailing seminars@masshist.org or calling (617) 646-0579.

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Public Program, Conversation Historians on Hamilton 22 September 2018.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Catherine Allgor, Massachusetts Historical Society; Lyra D. Monteiro, Rutgers University-Newark; Joseph M. Adelman, Framingham State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). The musical Hamilton has catapulted a founding father to the heights of popular culture.Three ...

The musical Hamilton has catapulted a founding father to the heights of popular culture.Three historians will explore this creative approach to discussing the stories of America’s founding, the conversations that have been created by this phenomenon, and how the excitement can be used to inspire the public to look at American history in greater depth.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk Under the Starry Flag: How a Band of Irish Americans Joined the Fenian Revolt and Sparked a Crisis over Citizenship 24 September 2018.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lucy Salyer, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In 1867 forty Irish-American freedom fighters, outfitted with guns and ammunition, sailed to Ireland ...

In 1867 forty Irish-American freedom fighters, outfitted with guns and ammunition, sailed to Ireland to join the effort to end British rule. Yet they never got a chance to fight. British authorities arrested them for treason as soon as they landed, sparking an international conflict that dragged the United States and Britain to the brink of war. Under the Starry Flag recounts this gripping legal saga, a prelude to today’s immigration battles.

 

 

 

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Radical Nonviolence and Interracial Utopias in the Early Civil Rights Movement 25 September 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Victoria Wolcott, State University of New York at Buffalo Comment: Jason Sokol, University of New Hampshire This paper examines how radical pacifists refined nonviolent direct action to challenge racial ...

This paper examines how radical pacifists refined nonviolent direct action to challenge racial segregation and inequality in the United States. These activists adopted the methods of earlier utopian communities by living communally and practicing a prefigurative politics that called for immediate change.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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Library Closed Library Closed 26 September 2018.Wednesday, all day The Library is CLOSED for a staff development event.

The Library is CLOSED for a staff development event.

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Public Program, Author Talk Race Over Party: Black Politics and Partisanship in Late Nineteenth-Century Boston 27 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Millington Bergeson-Lockwood There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In late 19th-century Boston, battles over black party loyalty were fights over the place of African ...

In late 19th-century Boston, battles over black party loyalty were fights over the place of African Americans in the post–Civil War nation. Party politics became the terrain upon which black Bostonians tested the promise of equality in America’s democracy. Most African Americans remained loyal Republicans, but a determined cadre argued that the GOP took black votes for granted and offered little meaningful reward for black support. These activists branded themselves “independents,” forging new alliances and advocating support of whichever candidate would support black freedom regardless of party.

 

 

 

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October
Early American History Seminar The Protestant Cult of the Dead in New England, 1800-1848 2 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Erik Seeman, State University of New York at Buffalo Comment: Kenneth Minkema, Yale University Many 19th-century Protestants in New England held religious ceremonies venerating deceased family ...

Many 19th-century Protestants in New England held religious ceremonies venerating deceased family and friends, in addition to their orthodox worship of God. This paper examines women’s desires to connect with their deceased loved ones, and argues that this drove important developments in Protestant belief and practice. It shows how pious Protestants maintaining connections with the dead made séance Spiritualism a transatlantic sensation in 1848.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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Brown Bag Native Citizens: Race, Culture, & the Politics of Belonging, 1884-1924 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet ...

As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet overlooked—role in shaping constructions of American citizenship. Some pushed to harden the political boundaries separating Native nations from their American foil, while others sought to remove those boundaries completely. Still others sought a more permeable relationship. This talk traces those debates from the 1884 Elk v. Wilkins decision through the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act.

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Public Program, Author Talk American Honor: The Creation of the Nation's Ideals during the Revolutionary Era 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Craig Bruce Smith, William Woods University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). The American Revolution was not only a revolution for liberty and freedom; it was also a ...

The American Revolution was not only a revolution for liberty and freedom; it was also a revolution of ethics, reshaping what colonial Americans understood as “honor” and “virtue.” As Craig Bruce Smith demonstrates, these concepts were crucial aspects of Revolutionary Americans’ ideological break from Europe, shared by all ranks of society. Focusing his study primarily on prominent Americans who came of age before and during the Revolution, Smith shows how a colonial ethical transformation caused and became inseparable from the American Revolution, creating an ethical ideology that still remains.

 

 

 

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Notice Library Closing @ 3:30PM 4 October 2018.Thursday, all day The Library closes early at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event.

The Library closes early at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event.

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Fashioning the New England Family Exhibition, Member Event, Special Event Fashioning the New England Family: Sneak Preview Reception 4 October 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is now sold out. Take a journey through several centuries of New England style in an exhibition of textiles and ...

Take a journey through several centuries of New England style in an exhibition of textiles and artifacts from the MHS collection.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the the opening of Fashioning the New England Family. The exhibition uncovers stories as told by various samples of clothing, fabric, accoutrements, and associated manuscripts—many shown for the first time. Join us and explore several family narratives as well as the cultural, social, and economic history of Massachusetts through the lens of fashion. The exhibition will be open through 6 April 2019.

Become a Member today!

Special thanks to preview reception sponsor

M&T Bank logo

 

 

 

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Fashioning the New England Family Exhibitionbegins Fashioning the New England Family 5 October 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Fashioning the New England Family explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of ...

Fashioning the New England Family explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition will give scholars, students, and professionals in fields such as fashion, material culture, and history the chance to see these items for the first time; encourage research; and, provide the possibility for new discoveries. For the public, it is an opportunity to view in detail painstaking craftsmanship, discover how examples of material culture relate to significant moments in our history, and learn how garments were used as political statements, projecting an individual’s religion, loyalties, and social status. It may allow some to recognize and appreciate family keepsakes but it will certainly help us all to better understand the messages we may have previously missed in American art and literature. 

The exhibition is organized as part of MASS Fashion, a consortium of eight cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. 

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Brown Bag Liverpool, Slavery, and the Atlantic Cotton Frontier c. 1763-1833 5 October 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Alexey Krichtal, Johns Hopkins University This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast ...

This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast Brazil and the American South, the planters who owned cotton plantations, the mariners who crossed the Atlantic basin shipping the fiber to Europe, and the merchants who linked enslaved producers to the Manchester manufacturers and fashion-orientated consumers in the Americas on a scale never see before, helping to usher in the first Industrial Revolution.

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Public Program, Revolution 250 Boston Occupied: The British Are Coming . . . Again! 6 October 2018.Saturday, all day In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had been rising since ...

In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpgbeen rising since the passage of the Townshend Acts. Boston was a town of about 16,000 residents and the arrival of 2,000 soldiers did not calm tensions but rather marked an escalation that would eventually lead to the Boston Massacre. A reenactment of the arrival of the troops in Boston Harbor, their parade through Boston, and encampment on the Common will be reenacted this October. A tentative itinerary is listed below; stay tuned for updates!

9:00 am: British Troops land at Long Wharf

9:30 am: Salute to King George III at the Old State House

10:00 am: Troops arrive at Faneuil Hall

10:30 am: Troops welcomed at the Reviewing Stand–Downtown Crossing

11:15 am: Troops arrive on Boston Common

From 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm: British Soldiers patrol Downtown Boston and occupy Boston Common

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 6 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Public Program, Revolution 250 Boston Occupied: The British Are Coming . . . Again! 7 October 2018.Sunday, 9:00AM - 1:00PM In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had been rising since ...

In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had been rising since the passage of the Townshend Acts. Boston was a town of about   Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpg16,000 residents and the arrival of 2,000 soldiers did not calm tensions but rather marked an escalation that would eventually lead  to the Boston Massacre. A reenactment of the arrival of the troops in Boston Harbor, their parade through Boston, and encampment on the Common will be reenacted this October. Stay tuned for updates!

From 10:00 am to 12:00 pm:                          

British Soldiers patrol Downtown Boston and occupy Boston Common

 

 

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Public Program Opening Our Doors 8 October 2018.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM The Massachusetts Historical Society will join our neighboring cultural institutions for a day of ...

The Massachusetts Historical Society will join our neighboring cultural institutions for a day of free history, art, music, and cultural happenings in the Fenway neighborhood. With over 20 different museums, venues, colleges, and organizations participating, there will be something for everyone.

 

 

 

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Library Closed Columbus Day 8 October 2018.Monday, all day The Library is CLOSED for Columbus Day.

The Library is CLOSED for Columbus Day.

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Environmental History Seminar Panel: Native American Environmental History 9 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Lisa Brooks, Amherst College; Strother Roberts, Bowdoin College; Ashley Smith, Hampshire College; Thomas Wickman, Trinity College Moderator: Cedric Woods, Institute for New England Native American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston This panel will explore the intersections of environmental history and indigenous studies—the ...

This panel will explore the intersections of environmental history and indigenous studies—the questions that each field engenders in the other, as well as the perspectives that native and non-native scholars bring to their research as they traverse both fields. Questions of race, gender, geography, and sources enliven this growing body of scholarship. Join us for a stimulating and wide-ranging conversation on these and other topics.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

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Public Program Boston Historical Reception 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-event reception at 5:30 Hosted by Anita Walker, Mass Cultural Council

There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of history organizations. Boston and surrounding towns are steeped in local history and the inhabitants are proud of their local identity. The MHS is pleased to hold a reception for history buffs and representatives of local organizations to mingle, share recent accomplishments, and talk about the great projects on which they are working.

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Brown Bag Notes on Phillis Wheatley: Prodigy, Poetics, and the Science of the Human, 1761-1800 13 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Camille Owens, Yale University

This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing on Wheatley’s education as an enslaved child. It reconstructs Wheatley’s education in relation to early American philosophy and pedagogy of childhood, looking to primers, tract literature, and the influence of Locke. From there, it examines the often-cited (and likely fictionalized) “trials” of Phillis Wheatley—and to Jefferson’s Notes on Wheatley—to show the performance of authenticating and/or discrediting black intellect as a cultural tradition which Wheatley’s literary career inaugurated.

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Special Event, Public Program JQA Transcribe-a-thon 14 July 2018.Saturday, 9:30AM - 3:00PM JQA Transcribe-a-thon

JQA pages

Celebrate John Quincy Adams's birthday at the second annual transcribe-a-thon! Immerse yourself in JQA's diary and help the Adams Papers Editorial Project make more of his 15,000-page diary available online. 

While the ability to read handwriting is necessary, no transcription experience is required. Bring your laptop or use one of ours. Come for the day or pop in for a little while. All are welcome!

Lunch and light refreshments will be provided. Registration is free and open to the public. For more information, or to register, contact Gwen Fries: gfries@masshist.org; 617-646-0556. 

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Teacher Workshop Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution 18 July 2018 to 20 July 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Public Program, Author Talk Back Bay through Time 19 July 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Anthony Sammarco There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th century but one that was infilled and planned as the premier residential and institutional development. in this photographic history of the Back Bay of Boston, Anthony M. Sammarco, with the contemporary photographs of Peter B. Kingman, has created a fascinating book that chronicles the neighborhood from the late 19th century through to today.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 21 July 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Public Program Gallery Talk: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End 21 July 2018.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clark Pearce Gallery Talk

Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the exhibition’s highlights while giving deeper context to the life and work of two extraordinary Massachusetts craftsmen, Isaac Vose and Thomas Seymour.

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Brown Bag The End of War: The Wabanaki Struggle with New England, 1722-1727 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ian Saxine, Alfred University

This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the conflict as the final resolution of a half-century of imperial crisis in the region. The talk argues the limits of indigenous, colonial, and imperial power influenced the war’s outbreak, the fighting, and its resolution.

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Public Program, Author Talk Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Paul Collins, Portland State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George Parkman, vanished. What resulted was a baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment on the grounds of Harvard Medical School. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster pioneered the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings 19th-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together accounts of one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.

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Teacher Workshop Immigration Policy in American History 26 July 2018 to 27 July 2018 Registration fee: $35 per person

This workshop has been POSTPONED.  We will post further information here when it is rescheduled. 

The Society holds a wealth of material to contextualize contemporary debates over immigration. From Irish immigration to Boston and the parallel Know-Nothing movement, the Progressive Era and efforts to “Americanize” immigrants, to debates over immigration restriction in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, we will explore the roots of current immigration policies and their legacy in politics today.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Brown Bag Maroon Ecologies: Albery Allson Whitman and the Place of Poetry 27 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine McIntyre, Columbia University

This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The Rape of Florida through an analysis of colonial cartographic practices. Using maps to examine the cartographic representation of swamps and other wetlands that permeate the boundary between land and water, this talk opens questions about the porous ecologies of maroon communities and the poetics that follow from such ecologies.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 28 July 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag The Heterodox Atlantic: Italian Heretics in Early America 30 July 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Diego Pirillo, University of California, Berkeley

This talk presents the initial findings of a new project on religious radicalism in early America, which aims at recovering the transatlantic legacy of Italian Protestantism. Focusing on 17th- and 18th-century New England, the talk examines discussions on religious migration and liberty of conscience.

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Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag Sensory Experiences of Daily Life at New England Hospitals for the Insane 6 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Madeline Kearin, Brown University

Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were originally envisioned as “technological marvels” that would solve the national mental health crisis. This talk examines how New England lunatic hospitals were designed to mobilize sensory experience to cure mental illness, and how these designs shaped patient experiences.

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Teacher Workshop The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy 8 August 2018 to 10 August 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

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Brown Bag Postponed:
"The Shade of Private Life": The Right to Privacy and the Press in American Art, 1875-1900
10 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicole Williams, Yale University

This brown bag is postponed to a later date.

This talk considers how American artists at the close of the nineteenth century advanced a new, modern notion of privacy in response to the rise of tabloid journalism and the emergence of invasive reporting genres like the gossip column and the personal exposé. It examines a diverse series of paintings, sculptures, and photographs in relation to period critiques of the press and the emerging legal concept of "the right to privacy."

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 11 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Teacher Workshop Canceled:
Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights
15 August 2018 to 17 August 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

 

This workshop has been POSTPONED until Summer 2019. We will post further information here when it is rescheduled.

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

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Teacher Workshop Canceled:
Education: Equality and Access
23 August 2018 to 24 August 2018 Registration fee: $35 per person

 This workshop has been POSTPONED.  Further information will be posted here when it is rescheduled.

This program will investigate the history of education access in Massachusetts and the United States, with a particular focus on access to education for African American students. Participants will learn more about Massachusetts residents who influenced national education policies, Massachusetts court cases that changed the course of national education policy, and the legacy of segregation and desegregation practices that impact Massachusetts schools to this day.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee).

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Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 August 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

 

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Brown Bag The Missionary Republic: American Evangelicals and the Birth of Modern Missions 27 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Thomas Whittaker, Harvard University

The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain, the United States, and continental Europe. This talk explains why Americans bought into the missions movement and how they domesticated it within a republican vision of civilization building on the frontier.

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Brown Bag Masters of the Market: Ship Captaincy in the Colonial British Atlantic 31 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Hannah Tucker, University of Virginia

During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in markets far from the owners’ direct oversight. This talk explores why the economic services ship captains provided transformed as the Atlantic trading economy became more complex, capital intensive, and informed in the eighteenth century.

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Building Closed Labor Day 1 September 2018.Saturday, all day

The Society is CLOSED on Saturday, 1 September, for Labor Day.

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Building Closed Labor Day 3 September 2018.Monday, all day

The Society is CLOSED in observance of Labor Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 4 September.

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Brown Bag Garrisonian Rhode Island: Reassessing Abolitionism’s Radicals 5 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Vrevich, Ohio State University

This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s “radical” abolitionism, in the larger antislavery network. As historians of abolitionism increasingly focus on continuities within the movement, Rhode Island offers an opportunity to reassess the place of the Garrisonians and to reconsider their contributions.

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Public Program, Conversation 100 Years of Educating Henry Adams 6 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Natalie Dykstra, Hope College; William Decker, Oklahoma State University; and Natalie Taylor, Skidmore College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Henry Adams offers an account of his life and commentary on political and cultural events during the mid and late 19th century in the Pulitzer Prize–winning autobiography The Education of Henry Adams. Join us to mark the centenary of both Adams’s death and the Education’s publication with a critical conversation on Adams and his best known work.

 

 

 

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Brown Bag American Silver, Chinese Silverwares, and the Global Circulation of Value 7 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Susan Eberhard, University of California, Berkeley

Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, some of which was reworked into silverwares by Chinese craftsmen for British and American buyers. This talk explores the different silver conduits of the American trade relationship with China. Far from a neutral medium, how were understandings of its materiality mobilized in cross-cultural transactions?

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 8 September 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825.

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Brown Bag “This Summer-Home of the Survivors”: The Civil War Vacation in Architecture & Landscape, 1878-1910 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM C. Ian Stevenson, Boston University

In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront locations to merge memory and leisure among their comrades and families. Through interdisciplinary lenses, this talk considers the ways veterans used architecture and landscape to heal their wartime trauma and preserve their scripted legacy.

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Public Program, Author Talk Boston's Massacre 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Eric Hinderaker , University of Utah There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpgBoston’s Custom House, killing five people. Denounced as an act of unprovoked violence and villainy, the Boston Massacre became one of the most familiar incidents in American history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining in forensic detail the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions at the time, and the long campaign to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

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Exhibition Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825 14 September 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Isaac Vose Couch

Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new exhibition and accompanying volume. Beginning with a modest pair of collection boxes he made for his localBoston church in 1788, Vose went on to build a substantial business empire and to make furniture for the most prominent Boston families. The exhibition and catalog restore Vose from relative obscurity to his rightful position as one of Boston’s most important craftsmen. Opening at the MHS on May 11, the exhibition will be on view through September 14.

The complementary book, Rather Elegant Than Showy (May 2018), by Robert Mussey and Clark Pearce, will be available for sale at the MHS.

Image: Couch, Isaac Vose & Son, with Thomas Wightman, carver, Boston, 1824. Historic New England, Gift of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1923.507); photograph by David Bohl.

 

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Brown Bag A Possible Connection between a Scandal and Susanna Rowson's Last Novel 14 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Steven Epley, Samford University

The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author Susanna Rowson may have based her last novel, Lucy Temple, at least in part on a scandal in which she was innocently but indirectly involved in Medford, Mass., in 1799.

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Public Program, Author Talk If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection 18 September 2018.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Edinburgh There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Bringing to light previously unpublished manuscript letters, essays, speeches, and photographs from Frederick Douglass and his sons, Charles Remond, Frederick Jr., and Lewis Henry Douglass, If I Survive casts Douglass in the role of dedicated family man and inspirational figure to his five children. This family biography as accompanied by these personal documents comprises the first extensive study of Frederick Douglass and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the post-emancipation era.

 

 

 

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Special Event Graduate Student Reception 20 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM

Calling all graduate students and faculty in history, American Studies, or any related field! Please join us for our ninth annual Graduate Student Reception.

 

Starting at six pm, you can enjoy free drinks and hors d’oeuvres as you meet students and professors from other universities working in your fields. At 6:30 or a little later, set down your glass and take a behind-the-scenes tour to learn more about the Society's collections as well as the resources available to support your scholarship, from research fellowships to our six different seminar series.

 

Faculty, bring your graduate students! Graduate students, bring your cohort! This reception is free, but we ask that you RSVP by September 19, by emailing seminars@masshist.org or calling (617) 646-0579.

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Public Program, Conversation Historians on Hamilton 22 September 2018.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Catherine Allgor, Massachusetts Historical Society; Lyra D. Monteiro, Rutgers University-Newark; Joseph M. Adelman, Framingham State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

The musical Hamilton has catapulted a founding father to the heights of popular culture.Three historians will explore this creative approach to discussing the stories of America’s founding, the conversations that have been created by this phenomenon, and how the excitement can be used to inspire the public to look at American history in greater depth.

 

 

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Public Program, Author Talk Under the Starry Flag: How a Band of Irish Americans Joined the Fenian Revolt and Sparked a Crisis over Citizenship 24 September 2018.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lucy Salyer, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In 1867 forty Irish-American freedom fighters, outfitted with guns and ammunition, sailed to Ireland to join the effort to end British rule. Yet they never got a chance to fight. British authorities arrested them for treason as soon as they landed, sparking an international conflict that dragged the United States and Britain to the brink of war. Under the Starry Flag recounts this gripping legal saga, a prelude to today’s immigration battles.

 

 

 

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Radical Nonviolence and Interracial Utopias in the Early Civil Rights Movement 25 September 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Victoria Wolcott, State University of New York at Buffalo Comment: Jason Sokol, University of New Hampshire

This paper examines how radical pacifists refined nonviolent direct action to challenge racial segregation and inequality in the United States. These activists adopted the methods of earlier utopian communities by living communally and practicing a prefigurative politics that called for immediate change.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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Library Closed Library Closed 26 September 2018.Wednesday, all day

The Library is CLOSED for a staff development event.

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Public Program, Author Talk Race Over Party: Black Politics and Partisanship in Late Nineteenth-Century Boston 27 September 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Millington Bergeson-Lockwood There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In late 19th-century Boston, battles over black party loyalty were fights over the place of African Americans in the post–Civil War nation. Party politics became the terrain upon which black Bostonians tested the promise of equality in America’s democracy. Most African Americans remained loyal Republicans, but a determined cadre argued that the GOP took black votes for granted and offered little meaningful reward for black support. These activists branded themselves “independents,” forging new alliances and advocating support of whichever candidate would support black freedom regardless of party.

 

 

 

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Early American History Seminar The Protestant Cult of the Dead in New England, 1800-1848 2 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Erik Seeman, State University of New York at Buffalo Comment: Kenneth Minkema, Yale University

Many 19th-century Protestants in New England held religious ceremonies venerating deceased family and friends, in addition to their orthodox worship of God. This paper examines women’s desires to connect with their deceased loved ones, and argues that this drove important developments in Protestant belief and practice. It shows how pious Protestants maintaining connections with the dead made séance Spiritualism a transatlantic sensation in 1848.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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Brown Bag Native Citizens: Race, Culture, & the Politics of Belonging, 1884-1924 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire

As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet overlooked—role in shaping constructions of American citizenship. Some pushed to harden the political boundaries separating Native nations from their American foil, while others sought to remove those boundaries completely. Still others sought a more permeable relationship. This talk traces those debates from the 1884 Elk v. Wilkins decision through the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act.

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Public Program, Author Talk American Honor: The Creation of the Nation's Ideals during the Revolutionary Era 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Craig Bruce Smith, William Woods University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

The American Revolution was not only a revolution for liberty and freedom; it was also a revolution of ethics, reshaping what colonial Americans understood as “honor” and “virtue.” As Craig Bruce Smith demonstrates, these concepts were crucial aspects of Revolutionary Americans’ ideological break from Europe, shared by all ranks of society. Focusing his study primarily on prominent Americans who came of age before and during the Revolution, Smith shows how a colonial ethical transformation caused and became inseparable from the American Revolution, creating an ethical ideology that still remains.

 

 

 

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Notice Library Closing @ 3:30PM 4 October 2018.Thursday, all day

The Library closes early at 3:30PM in preparation for an evening event.

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Exhibition, Member Event, Special Event Fashioning the New England Family: Sneak Preview Reception 4 October 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is now sold out. Fashioning the New England Family

Take a journey through several centuries of New England style in an exhibition of textiles and artifacts from the MHS collection.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the the opening of Fashioning the New England Family. The exhibition uncovers stories as told by various samples of clothing, fabric, accoutrements, and associated manuscripts—many shown for the first time. Join us and explore several family narratives as well as the cultural, social, and economic history of Massachusetts through the lens of fashion. The exhibition will be open through 6 April 2019.

Become a Member today!

Special thanks to preview reception sponsor

M&T Bank logo

 

 

 

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Exhibition Fashioning the New England Family this event is free 5 October 2018 to 6 April 2019 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Fashioning the New England Family

Fashioning the New England Family explores the ways in which the multiple meanings of fashion and fashionable goods are reflected in patterns of consumption and refashioning, recycling, and retaining favorite family pieces. Many of the items that will be featured have been out of sight, having never been exhibited for the public or seen in living memory. The exhibition will give scholars, students, and professionals in fields such as fashion, material culture, and history the chance to see these items for the first time; encourage research; and, provide the possibility for new discoveries. For the public, it is an opportunity to view in detail painstaking craftsmanship, discover how examples of material culture relate to significant moments in our history, and learn how garments were used as political statements, projecting an individual’s religion, loyalties, and social status. It may allow some to recognize and appreciate family keepsakes but it will certainly help us all to better understand the messages we may have previously missed in American art and literature. 

The exhibition is organized as part of MASS Fashion, a consortium of eight cultural institutions set up to explore and celebrate the many facets of the culture of fashion in Massachusetts. 

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Brown Bag Liverpool, Slavery, and the Atlantic Cotton Frontier c. 1763-1833 5 October 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Alexey Krichtal, Johns Hopkins University

This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast Brazil and the American South, the planters who owned cotton plantations, the mariners who crossed the Atlantic basin shipping the fiber to Europe, and the merchants who linked enslaved producers to the Manchester manufacturers and fashion-orientated consumers in the Americas on a scale never see before, helping to usher in the first Industrial Revolution.

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Public Program, Revolution 250 Boston Occupied: The British Are Coming . . . Again! 6 October 2018.Saturday, all day

In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpgbeen rising since the passage of the Townshend Acts. Boston was a town of about 16,000 residents and the arrival of 2,000 soldiers did not calm tensions but rather marked an escalation that would eventually lead to the Boston Massacre. A reenactment of the arrival of the troops in Boston Harbor, their parade through Boston, and encampment on the Common will be reenacted this October. A tentative itinerary is listed below; stay tuned for updates!

9:00 am: British Troops land at Long Wharf

9:30 am: Salute to King George III at the Old State House

10:00 am: Troops arrive at Faneuil Hall

10:30 am: Troops welcomed at the Reviewing Stand–Downtown Crossing

11:15 am: Troops arrive on Boston Common

From 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm: British Soldiers patrol Downtown Boston and occupy Boston Common

 

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 6 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

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Public Program, Revolution 250 Boston Occupied: The British Are Coming . . . Again! 7 October 2018.Sunday, 9:00AM - 1:00PM

In October of 1768 the British government sent troops to quell the unrest that had been rising since the passage of the Townshend Acts. Boston was a town of about   Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/revolution250_vertical_logo.jpg16,000 residents and the arrival of 2,000 soldiers did not calm tensions but rather marked an escalation that would eventually lead  to the Boston Massacre. A reenactment of the arrival of the troops in Boston Harbor, their parade through Boston, and encampment on the Common will be reenacted this October. Stay tuned for updates!

From 10:00 am to 12:00 pm:                          

British Soldiers patrol Downtown Boston and occupy Boston Common

 

 

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Public Program Opening Our Doors 8 October 2018.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM

The Massachusetts Historical Society will join our neighboring cultural institutions for a day of free history, art, music, and cultural happenings in the Fenway neighborhood. With over 20 different museums, venues, colleges, and organizations participating, there will be something for everyone.

 

 

 

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Library Closed Columbus Day 8 October 2018.Monday, all day

The Library is CLOSED for Columbus Day.

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Environmental History Seminar Panel: Native American Environmental History 9 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Lisa Brooks, Amherst College; Strother Roberts, Bowdoin College; Ashley Smith, Hampshire College; Thomas Wickman, Trinity College Moderator: Cedric Woods, Institute for New England Native American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston

This panel will explore the intersections of environmental history and indigenous studies—the questions that each field engenders in the other, as well as the perspectives that native and non-native scholars bring to their research as they traverse both fields. Questions of race, gender, geography, and sources enliven this growing body of scholarship. Join us for a stimulating and wide-ranging conversation on these and other topics.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events