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October 2018
Public Program Evan Thomas on writing presidential biographies 11 October 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT This event is sold out   Evan Thomas, the author of nine books and a former writer and editor ...

This event is sold out

 

Evan Thomas, the author of nine books and a former writer and editor for Time and Newsweek, will be the first speaker in our new MHS Speaker Fund annual lecture series. Having published books on Roosevelt, Eisenhower, Nixon, Clinton, and Obama, he will offer his insight into writing presidential biographies.

 

 

 

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 13 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Brown Bag Examining Land Ownership in the Praying Towns of New England 15 October 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Taylor Kirsch, University of California, Santa Cruz Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous ...

Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous population numbering in the thousands carved out space for themselves via an unlikely colonial project, “praying towns.” This talk explores the complexities of indigenous land tenure within these communities, and its role in shaping the cultural, political, and spiritual landscape of New England.

More
Public Program, Conversation "All Legislative Powers…" Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution Then & Now 15 October 2018.Monday, 5:00PM - 7:30PM Location: The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 136 Irving Street Cambridge, Mass. Margaret H. Marshall, Choate, Hall, & Stewart, and former Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts; Jack N. Rakove, Stanford University, and Pulitzer Prize recipient Join us for a thought-provoking conversation on the history surrounding the issues that are framed ...

Join us for a thought-provoking conversation on the history surrounding the issues that are framed by Article 1 of the Constitution, which established the U.S. Congress and defined its powers, including the rights to tax, raise armies, and regulate commerce and naturalization. Marshall and Rakove will discuss the historical context in which the article was drafted in the 1780s, as well as the current meaning and impact of the article in contemporary legal thought and practice. The Massachusetts Constitution will serve as counterpoint to the national story.

 

This program is a collaboration between the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the MHS.

 

Please note that registration is through the AAAS website. Please click on the non-member link to register.

 

 

More
Brown Bag “Watering of the Olive Plant”: Catechisms and Catechizing in Early New England 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Roberto Flores de Apodaca, University of South Carolina Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms ...

Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms shaped relations of faith for church membership, provided content for missions to the Indians, and empowered lay persons theologically to critique their ministers. This talk explores the content and the function of these unique, question and answer documents.

More
Public Program, Author Talk The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Joanne Freeman, Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. ...

Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, she shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. Pistols were drawn and knives brandished in an attempt to intimidate fellow congressmen into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery.

 

 

 

More
African American History Seminar Losing Laroche: The Story of the Titanic’s Only Black Passenger 18 October 2018.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Comment: Saje Mathieu, University of Minnesota Losing Laroche is the first in-depth study of the only black family on board the RMS ...

Losing Laroche is the first in-depth study of the only black family on board the RMS Titanic. The story of the Haitian Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche and his descendants is largely unknown and troubles the assumption of an all-white Titanic narrative. This paper seeks to understand the possibilities of black advancement in the Titanic moment and throughout the Diaspora.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 20 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Public Program, Walking Tour Tour of Longfellow Bridge 20 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The tour group will meet in front of the Charles Circle CVS, 155 Charles Street, Boston MA 02114 Miguel Rosales THIS PROGRAM IS NOW SOLD OUT. After five years and over $300 million worth of construction and refurbishment, the beautiful and ...

After five years and over $300 million worth of construction and refurbishment, the beautiful and historic Longfellow Bridge is once again fully operational. Constructed at the turn of the 20th century and designed with an eye towards the greatest infrastructure projects of Europe, the Longfellow Bridge has long been one of the most striking and beloved landmarks in Boston. Architect and urban designer Miguel Rosales has been involved in this restoration project for close to 15 years and will lead visitors on an in-depth tour of this exceptional bridge.

 

 

 

More
Seminar Paul Revere's Ride through Digital History 22 October 2018.Monday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Joseph M. Adelman, Framingham State University and Omohundro Institute; Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute; Karin Wulf, Omohundro Institute This seminar examines components of the Omohundro Institute’s multi-platform digital project ...

This seminar examines components of the Omohundro Institute’s multi-platform digital project and podcast series, Doing History: To the Revolution. It explores Episode 130, “Paul Revere’s Ride through History,” and the ways the topic was constructed through narrative and audio effects, as well as the content in the complementary reader app. Participants are asked to listen to the podcast and access the reader app before the session. Refreshments will follow the presentation and discussion.

 

To reserve: Please call 617-646-0579 or e-mail seminars@masshist.org.

More
History of Women and Gender Seminar Reproducing Race in the Early Americas 23 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University; Deirdre Cooper Owens, Queens College; Sasha Turner, Quinnipiac University Moderator: Nicole Aljoe, Northeastern University This roundtable will use the body as frame for examining racial formation in the Caribbean and U.S. ...

This roundtable will use the body as frame for examining racial formation in the Caribbean and U.S. from the eighteenth century to the present. The presenters will meditate on biological reproduction in relation to citizenship and subjecthood, labor and economy, medical and scientific knowledge, and representations of blackness in popular culture.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Swindler Sachem: The American Indian Who Sold His Birthright, Dropped Out of Harvard, and Conned the King of England 24 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Jenny Hale Pulsipher, Brigham Young University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Jenny Pulsipher opens a window onto 17th-century New England and the English empire from the unusual ...

Jenny Pulsipher opens a window onto 17th-century New England and the English empire from the unusual perspective of John Wompas, a Nipmuc Indian who may not have been all he claimed but was certainly out of the ordinary. Drawing on documentary and anthropological sources as well as consultations with Native people, Pulsipher examines struggles over Native land and sovereignty during an era of political turmoil and reveals how Wompas navigated these perilous waters for the benefit of himself and his kin.

 

 

More
front clasp of a red cloak.  The cloak is tied with a red satin ribbon. Teacher Workshop Fashioning History 27 October 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration: $25 Throughout history, our choices about what we wear tell the world about our personality, position, ...

Throughout history, our choices about what we wear tell the world about our personality, position, background, and beliefs. From textile in Boston Boycott, manufacture in the Industrial Revolution, to the fashion of war and protest, clothing offers a vivid lens to examine American cultural history. Drawing on the MHS exhibit “Fashioning the New England Family,” we will explore how clothing and style help us understand the everyday lives of historical New Englanders.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

For questions, contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Public Program Armistice: WWI in Memory and Song 29 October 2018.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. A collaboration of MHS and the Boston Conservatory at Berklee with John Brancy, Baritone; Peter Dugan, Piano; and Peter Drummey, MHS There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). A temporary exhibition on the end of World War I will be coupled with songs and a conversation about ...

A temporary exhibition on the end of World War I will be coupled with songs and a conversation about the journey home that men and women faced at the close of The War to End All Wars. This program will explore both the history of the war and the memory of it. On Tuesday October 30 at 8:00 pm, John Brancy and Peter Dugan will perform their program “Armistice: The Journey Home” in Seully Hall at Boston Conservatory at Berklee.

 

 

 

More
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Governing the “Black Power” City: Leon H. Sullivan, Opportunities Industrialization Centers Inc., and the Rise of Black Empowerment 30 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jessica Ann Levy, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Julia Rabig, Dartmouth College This paper traces the Opportunities Industrialization Center’s rise from its meager founding ...

This paper traces the Opportunities Industrialization Center’s rise from its meager founding in North Philadelphia to one of the largest black community development programs in the United States. In doing so, it sheds new light on the financial and intellectual investments made by American business, government bureaucrats, and civil rights entrepreneurs like Sullivan in transforming black dissidents into “productive citizens,” “productive” having economic and civic connotations.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
November 2018
Biography Seminar “No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects 1 November 2018.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is ...

Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is not documented with words. Mute sources—objects in the subject’s archive—can pose a challenge for interpretation, but also offer rich opportunities. How can biographers read objects as eloquent sources?

Panelists include Deborah Lutz, whose book The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects is a biography of the sisters centered on the humble objects they owned. Susan Ware, author of the forthcoming Why They Marched: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote, is using artifacts from the Schlesinger Library’s collections in her group biography of suffrage activists. Karen Sanchez-Eppler is writing In the Archives of Childhood: Playing with the Past, viewing children’s lives from material things. Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, will moderate.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 3 November 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Early American History Seminar “A Rotten-Hearted Fellow”: The Rise of Alexander McDougall 6 November 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Minty, the Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society Comment: Brendan McConville, Boston University Historians have often grouped the DeLanceys of New York as self-interested opportunists who were ...

Historians have often grouped the DeLanceys of New York as self-interested opportunists who were destined to become loyalists. By focusing on the rise of Alexander McDougall, this paper offers a new interpretation, demonstrating how the DeLanceys and McDougall mobilized groups with competing visions of New York’s political economy. These prewar factions stayed in opposition until the Revolutionary War, thus shedding new light on the coming of the American Revolution.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag John Perkins Cushing and Boston's Early China Trade 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families ...

In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families in Boston, set sail for the Canton at the age of sixteen. The emerging literature on the Early American China trade often mentions Cushing as an aside, sometimes refers in passing to his importance among the foreign residents of Canton. This project explores how he came to be in that position of importance and casts Boston’s opium exchange at the center of the trade.

More
Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 Founding Martyr: The Life and Death of Dr. Joseph Warren, the American Revolution’s Lost Hero 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 with a special rum tasting courtesy of Privateer Rum Christian Di Spigna THIS PROGRAM IS NOW SOLD OUT Had he not been martyred at Bunker Hill in 1775, Dr. Joseph Warren, an architect of the colonial ...

Had he not been martyred at Bunker Hill in 1775, Dr. Joseph Warren, an architect of the colonial rebellion, might have led the country as Washington or Jefferson did. Warren was involved in almost every major insurrectionary act in the Boston, from the Stamp Act protests to the Boston Massacre to the Boston Tea Party, but his legacy has remained largely obscured. Di Spigna’s biography of Warren is the product of two decades of research and scores of newly unearthed documents that have given us this forgotten Founding Father anew.

Join our pre-talk reception at 5:30 for a special rum tasting courtesy of Privateer Rum.

 

 

More
Brown Bag Persistent Futures of Americas Past: The Genres of Geography and Race in Early America 9 November 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Timothy Fosbury, University of California, Los Angeles This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography ...

This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography of economic, political, and religious belonging in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by considering how place making was a form of nascent race making in the early Americas. Moving between New England, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, this talk considers how settler imaginings of their desired futures in the Americas produced the preconditions for what we would now call race.

More
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Public Program Evan Thomas on writing presidential biographies 11 October 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

This event is sold out

 

Evan Thomas, the author of nine books and a former writer and editor for Time and Newsweek, will be the first speaker in our new MHS Speaker Fund annual lecture series. Having published books on Roosevelt, Eisenhower, Nixon, Clinton, and Obama, he will offer his insight into writing presidential biographies.

 

 

 

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 13 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Brown Bag Examining Land Ownership in the Praying Towns of New England 15 October 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Taylor Kirsch, University of California, Santa Cruz

Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous population numbering in the thousands carved out space for themselves via an unlikely colonial project, “praying towns.” This talk explores the complexities of indigenous land tenure within these communities, and its role in shaping the cultural, political, and spiritual landscape of New England.

close

Public Program, Conversation "All Legislative Powers…" Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution Then & Now 15 October 2018.Monday, 5:00PM - 7:30PM Location: The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 136 Irving Street Cambridge, Mass. Margaret H. Marshall, Choate, Hall, & Stewart, and former Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts; Jack N. Rakove, Stanford University, and Pulitzer Prize recipient

Join us for a thought-provoking conversation on the history surrounding the issues that are framed by Article 1 of the Constitution, which established the U.S. Congress and defined its powers, including the rights to tax, raise armies, and regulate commerce and naturalization. Marshall and Rakove will discuss the historical context in which the article was drafted in the 1780s, as well as the current meaning and impact of the article in contemporary legal thought and practice. The Massachusetts Constitution will serve as counterpoint to the national story.

 

This program is a collaboration between the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the MHS.

 

Please note that registration is through the AAAS website. Please click on the non-member link to register.

 

 

close

Brown Bag “Watering of the Olive Plant”: Catechisms and Catechizing in Early New England 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Roberto Flores de Apodaca, University of South Carolina

Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms shaped relations of faith for church membership, provided content for missions to the Indians, and empowered lay persons theologically to critique their ministers. This talk explores the content and the function of these unique, question and answer documents.

close

Public Program, Author Talk The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Joanne Freeman, Yale University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, she shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. Pistols were drawn and knives brandished in an attempt to intimidate fellow congressmen into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery.

 

 

 

close

African American History Seminar Losing Laroche: The Story of the Titanic’s Only Black Passenger 18 October 2018.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Comment: Saje Mathieu, University of Minnesota

Losing Laroche is the first in-depth study of the only black family on board the RMS Titanic. The story of the Haitian Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche and his descendants is largely unknown and troubles the assumption of an all-white Titanic narrative. This paper seeks to understand the possibilities of black advancement in the Titanic moment and throughout the Diaspora.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 20 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Public Program, Walking Tour Tour of Longfellow Bridge 20 October 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The tour group will meet in front of the Charles Circle CVS, 155 Charles Street, Boston MA 02114 Miguel Rosales THIS PROGRAM IS NOW SOLD OUT.

After five years and over $300 million worth of construction and refurbishment, the beautiful and historic Longfellow Bridge is once again fully operational. Constructed at the turn of the 20th century and designed with an eye towards the greatest infrastructure projects of Europe, the Longfellow Bridge has long been one of the most striking and beloved landmarks in Boston. Architect and urban designer Miguel Rosales has been involved in this restoration project for close to 15 years and will lead visitors on an in-depth tour of this exceptional bridge.

 

 

 

close

Seminar Paul Revere's Ride through Digital History 22 October 2018.Monday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Joseph M. Adelman, Framingham State University and Omohundro Institute; Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute; Karin Wulf, Omohundro Institute

This seminar examines components of the Omohundro Institute’s multi-platform digital project and podcast series, Doing History: To the Revolution. It explores Episode 130, “Paul Revere’s Ride through History,” and the ways the topic was constructed through narrative and audio effects, as well as the content in the complementary reader app. Participants are asked to listen to the podcast and access the reader app before the session. Refreshments will follow the presentation and discussion.

 

To reserve: Please call 617-646-0579 or e-mail seminars@masshist.org.

close

History of Women and Gender Seminar Reproducing Race in the Early Americas 23 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute Rhae Lynn Barnes, Princeton University; Deirdre Cooper Owens, Queens College; Sasha Turner, Quinnipiac University Moderator: Nicole Aljoe, Northeastern University

This roundtable will use the body as frame for examining racial formation in the Caribbean and U.S. from the eighteenth century to the present. The presenters will meditate on biological reproduction in relation to citizenship and subjecthood, labor and economy, medical and scientific knowledge, and representations of blackness in popular culture.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Public Program, Author Talk Swindler Sachem: The American Indian Who Sold His Birthright, Dropped Out of Harvard, and Conned the King of England 24 October 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Jenny Hale Pulsipher, Brigham Young University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Jenny Pulsipher opens a window onto 17th-century New England and the English empire from the unusual perspective of John Wompas, a Nipmuc Indian who may not have been all he claimed but was certainly out of the ordinary. Drawing on documentary and anthropological sources as well as consultations with Native people, Pulsipher examines struggles over Native land and sovereignty during an era of political turmoil and reveals how Wompas navigated these perilous waters for the benefit of himself and his kin.

 

 

close

Teacher Workshop Fashioning History 27 October 2018.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration: $25 front clasp of a red cloak.  The cloak is tied with a red satin ribbon.

Throughout history, our choices about what we wear tell the world about our personality, position, background, and beliefs. From textile in Boston Boycott, manufacture in the Industrial Revolution, to the fashion of war and protest, clothing offers a vivid lens to examine American cultural history. Drawing on the MHS exhibit “Fashioning the New England Family,” we will explore how clothing and style help us understand the everyday lives of historical New Englanders.

This program is open to all who work with K-12 students. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

For questions, contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close

Public Program Armistice: WWI in Memory and Song 29 October 2018.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. A collaboration of MHS and the Boston Conservatory at Berklee with John Brancy, Baritone; Peter Dugan, Piano; and Peter Drummey, MHS There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

A temporary exhibition on the end of World War I will be coupled with songs and a conversation about the journey home that men and women faced at the close of The War to End All Wars. This program will explore both the history of the war and the memory of it. On Tuesday October 30 at 8:00 pm, John Brancy and Peter Dugan will perform their program “Armistice: The Journey Home” in Seully Hall at Boston Conservatory at Berklee.

 

 

 

close

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Governing the “Black Power” City: Leon H. Sullivan, Opportunities Industrialization Centers Inc., and the Rise of Black Empowerment 30 October 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jessica Ann Levy, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Julia Rabig, Dartmouth College

This paper traces the Opportunities Industrialization Center’s rise from its meager founding in North Philadelphia to one of the largest black community development programs in the United States. In doing so, it sheds new light on the financial and intellectual investments made by American business, government bureaucrats, and civil rights entrepreneurs like Sullivan in transforming black dissidents into “productive citizens,” “productive” having economic and civic connotations.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Biography Seminar “No Ideas But in Things”: Writing Lives from Objects 1 November 2018.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Deborah Lutz, University of Louisville; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Amherst College; Susan Ware, Independent Scholar Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College

Often a biographer confronts silences in the record of her subject, when part of the life story is not documented with words. Mute sources—objects in the subject’s archive—can pose a challenge for interpretation, but also offer rich opportunities. How can biographers read objects as eloquent sources?

Panelists include Deborah Lutz, whose book The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects is a biography of the sisters centered on the humble objects they owned. Susan Ware, author of the forthcoming Why They Marched: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote, is using artifacts from the Schlesinger Library’s collections in her group biography of suffrage activists. Karen Sanchez-Eppler is writing In the Archives of Childhood: Playing with the Past, viewing children’s lives from material things. Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, will moderate.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 3 November 2018.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Early American History Seminar “A Rotten-Hearted Fellow”: The Rise of Alexander McDougall 6 November 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Christopher Minty, the Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society Comment: Brendan McConville, Boston University

Historians have often grouped the DeLanceys of New York as self-interested opportunists who were destined to become loyalists. By focusing on the rise of Alexander McDougall, this paper offers a new interpretation, demonstrating how the DeLanceys and McDougall mobilized groups with competing visions of New York’s political economy. These prewar factions stayed in opposition until the Revolutionary War, thus shedding new light on the coming of the American Revolution.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Brown Bag John Perkins Cushing and Boston's Early China Trade 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross

In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families in Boston, set sail for the Canton at the age of sixteen. The emerging literature on the Early American China trade often mentions Cushing as an aside, sometimes refers in passing to his importance among the foreign residents of Canton. This project explores how he came to be in that position of importance and casts Boston’s opium exchange at the center of the trade.

close

Public Program, Author Talk, Revolution 250 Founding Martyr: The Life and Death of Dr. Joseph Warren, the American Revolution’s Lost Hero 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 with a special rum tasting courtesy of Privateer Rum Christian Di Spigna THIS PROGRAM IS NOW SOLD OUT

Had he not been martyred at Bunker Hill in 1775, Dr. Joseph Warren, an architect of the colonial rebellion, might have led the country as Washington or Jefferson did. Warren was involved in almost every major insurrectionary act in the Boston, from the Stamp Act protests to the Boston Massacre to the Boston Tea Party, but his legacy has remained largely obscured. Di Spigna’s biography of Warren is the product of two decades of research and scores of newly unearthed documents that have given us this forgotten Founding Father anew.

Join our pre-talk reception at 5:30 for a special rum tasting courtesy of Privateer Rum.

 

 

close

Brown Bag Persistent Futures of Americas Past: The Genres of Geography and Race in Early America 9 November 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Timothy Fosbury, University of California, Los Angeles

This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography of economic, political, and religious belonging in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by considering how place making was a form of nascent race making in the early Americas. Moving between New England, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, this talk considers how settler imaginings of their desired futures in the Americas produced the preconditions for what we would now call race.

close


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