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April 2019
Special Event, Member Event, Exhibition “Can She Do It?” Massachusetts Debates a Woman’s Right to Vote: Sneak Preview Reception 25 April 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please note: space at this event is limited. This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for “Can She Do It ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for “Can She Do It?” The exhibtion explores the activism and debate around women’s suffrage in Massachusetts. Featuring items from the MHS collection, it illustrates in dynamic imagery the passion that surrounded both sides of the suffrage question.tent or other content into the box.

Become a Member today!

 

Special thanks to our exhibition sponsor

 

 

 

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Public Program Visual Culture of Suffrage 29 April 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology Registration is required at no cost. As we have seen from the portraits of women selected to appear on the new ten-dollar bill to the ...

As we have seen from the portraits of women selected to appear on the new ten-dollar bill to the posters featuring suffragists carried at the 2017 Women’s March, the visual culture of the suffrage movement still makes news today. Allison Lange will speak about the ways that women’s rights activists and their opponents used images to define gender and power throughout the suffrage movement.

This program is a part of ArtWeek.

 

 

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Seminar, Environmental History Seminar (Rescheduled) Amputated from the Land: Black Refugees from America and the Neglected Voices of Environmental History 30 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Bryon Williams, Academy at Penguin Hall Comment: John Stauffer, Harvard University This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by ...

This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by blacks who fled the U.S. to settle in the wilds of Ontario. These first-person accounts of environmental encounter and expertise are unrivaled in depth, breadth, and detail among black ecological writing of any era. New environmental histories need such accounts that not only counter dominant American environmental and political myths, but offer black-lived stories of environmental belonging and agency.

 

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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May 2019
Early American History Seminar Panel: After the Fighting: The Struggle for Revolutionary Settlement 7 May 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Eliga Gould, University of New Hampshire; Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College; Stephen Marini, Wellesley College; Brendan McConville, Boston University Moderator: TBD In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems ...

In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems and challenges. This panel examines how the revolutionary generation confronted issues of diplomacy, governance and economic growth, and how the legacies of warfare and political convulsion shaped spiritual and social behaviors in those troubled years.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals ...

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

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Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $25 per person Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first ...

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
More events
Special Event, Member Event, Exhibition “Can She Do It?” Massachusetts Debates a Woman’s Right to Vote: Sneak Preview Reception registration required at no cost 25 April 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please note: space at this event is limited. This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members.

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to the sneak preview reception for “Can She Do It?” The exhibtion explores the activism and debate around women’s suffrage in Massachusetts. Featuring items from the MHS collection, it illustrates in dynamic imagery the passion that surrounded both sides of the suffrage question.tent or other content into the box.

Become a Member today!

 

Special thanks to our exhibition sponsor

 

 

 

close

Public Program Visual Culture of Suffrage registration required at no cost 29 April 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology Registration is required at no cost.

As we have seen from the portraits of women selected to appear on the new ten-dollar bill to the posters featuring suffragists carried at the 2017 Women’s March, the visual culture of the suffrage movement still makes news today. Allison Lange will speak about the ways that women’s rights activists and their opponents used images to define gender and power throughout the suffrage movement.

This program is a part of ArtWeek.

 

 

close

Seminar, Environmental History Seminar (Rescheduled) Amputated from the Land: Black Refugees from America and the Neglected Voices of Environmental History Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
30 April 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bryon Williams, Academy at Penguin Hall Comment: John Stauffer, Harvard University

This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by blacks who fled the U.S. to settle in the wilds of Ontario. These first-person accounts of environmental encounter and expertise are unrivaled in depth, breadth, and detail among black ecological writing of any era. New environmental histories need such accounts that not only counter dominant American environmental and political myths, but offer black-lived stories of environmental belonging and agency.

 

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Early American History Seminar Panel: After the Fighting: The Struggle for Revolutionary Settlement Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
7 May 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Eliga Gould, University of New Hampshire; Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College; Stephen Marini, Wellesley College; Brendan McConville, Boston University Moderator: TBD

In the ten years after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781, the nation faced myriad problems and challenges. This panel examines how the revolutionary generation confronted issues of diplomacy, governance and economic growth, and how the legacies of warfare and political convulsion shaped spiritual and social behaviors in those troubled years.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World this event is free 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

close

Teacher Workshop “Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?” The Fight For and Against Women’s Suffrage Please RSVP   registration required 11 May 2019.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Massachusetts citizens played a central role in the suffrage movement; Worcester hosted the first national woman’s rights convention in 1850 and Bostonians, led by Lucy Stone, headed a national suffrage organization and edited a long-running woman’s rights newspaper. In response to these influential reformers, activists formed the first anti-suffrage organizations in Massachusetts as well. Drawing on MHS collections and our new suffrage exhibition, we will explore letters, newspapers, political cartoons, visual propaganda, and other sources that illuminate the history and motivations of women on both sides of the campaign for the vote.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close


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