Brown Bags

Extended
to May 26

Exhibition

The Private Jefferson

Explore Jefferson’s complexity through select correspondence and writings including the Declaration of Independence, records of farming at Monticello, and his architectural drawings.

Details

November

Back to today
Brown Bag On a Bender with Uncle Sam: Freedom, Resources, and the Lure of Progress in the Early Republic 20 November 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University How did the American Revolution change the colonial American economic culture and patterns of ...

How did the American Revolution change the colonial American economic culture and patterns of natural resource exploitation? How did the “release of energy” produced by the new political order contribute to new definitions of public and private acquisitiveness, wealth, and progress?

More
December
Brown Bag "To Spread Liberty to the North": The Invasion of Canada and the Coming of American Independence, 1774-1776 4 December 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Amy Noel, Boston University This project seeks to explain the enormous changes taking place in American society between 1774 and ...

This project seeks to explain the enormous changes taking place in American society between 1774 and 1776 by examining the failed invasion of Canada. The campaign played a crucial role in shaping colonial attitudes toward Catholicism and Britishness, the escalation of rebellion into an imperial civil war, and the looming issue of American independence.

More
Brown Bag The Memory Frontier: Memorializing King Philip's War in the Native Northeast 11 December 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christine DeLucia, Mount Holyoke College The late 17th-century conflict known as King Philip's War has haunted colonial New Englanders and ...

The late 17th-century conflict known as King Philip's War has haunted colonial New Englanders and diverse tribal communities.  Their remembrances of this violence have taken shape in highly local ways, through material objects, performances, and stories about landscapes.  This study highlights the importance of such overlooked sources for understanding the persistent, widespread effects of warfare and settler colonialism in the Northeast.

More
January
Brown Bag A Climatic Debate: Abolition and Climate in Eighteenth-Century Britain 8 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine Johnston, Columbia University Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the ...

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the West Indies grew increasingly serious, the Board of Trade interrogated people familiar with plantation life. What sorts of health risks did plantation work pose for enslaved laborers? Could Europeans labor in the West Indian climate? This project examines some of the testimony that absentee planters provided to Parliament and contrasts these arguments with evidence taken from these same planters' private letters. Public testimony did not always match up with personal opinions, and this project explores some of the differences between the two.

More
Brown Bag Americanizing America: Yankee Civilization and the U.S. State 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Dylan Yeats, New York University Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting ...

Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting at the Massachusetts Historical Society and Boston Athenaeum. Yeats is charting the evolution of what he terms the Yankee Network, comprising academic, educational, missionary, and social reform organizations, and the ways in which this network sought to harness those organs of the state that it could over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

More
More events
Brown Bag On a Bender with Uncle Sam: Freedom, Resources, and the Lure of Progress in the Early Republic this event is free 20 November 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University

How did the American Revolution change the colonial American economic culture and patterns of natural resource exploitation? How did the “release of energy” produced by the new political order contribute to new definitions of public and private acquisitiveness, wealth, and progress?

close
Brown Bag "To Spread Liberty to the North": The Invasion of Canada and the Coming of American Independence, 1774-1776 this event is free 4 December 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Amy Noel, Boston University

This project seeks to explain the enormous changes taking place in American society between 1774 and 1776 by examining the failed invasion of Canada. The campaign played a crucial role in shaping colonial attitudes toward Catholicism and Britishness, the escalation of rebellion into an imperial civil war, and the looming issue of American independence.

close
Brown Bag The Memory Frontier: Memorializing King Philip's War in the Native Northeast this event is free 11 December 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christine DeLucia, Mount Holyoke College

The late 17th-century conflict known as King Philip's War has haunted colonial New Englanders and diverse tribal communities.  Their remembrances of this violence have taken shape in highly local ways, through material objects, performances, and stories about landscapes.  This study highlights the importance of such overlooked sources for understanding the persistent, widespread effects of warfare and settler colonialism in the Northeast.

close
Brown Bag A Climatic Debate: Abolition and Climate in Eighteenth-Century Britain this event is free 8 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine Johnston, Columbia University

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the West Indies grew increasingly serious, the Board of Trade interrogated people familiar with plantation life. What sorts of health risks did plantation work pose for enslaved laborers? Could Europeans labor in the West Indian climate? This project examines some of the testimony that absentee planters provided to Parliament and contrasts these arguments with evidence taken from these same planters' private letters. Public testimony did not always match up with personal opinions, and this project explores some of the differences between the two.

close
Brown Bag Americanizing America: Yankee Civilization and the U.S. State this event is free 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Dylan Yeats, New York University

Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting at the Massachusetts Historical Society and Boston Athenaeum. Yeats is charting the evolution of what he terms the Yankee Network, comprising academic, educational, missionary, and social reform organizations, and the ways in which this network sought to harness those organs of the state that it could over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

close