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April 2018

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        • ExhibitionYankees in the West
          ends ExhibitionYankees in the West
          10:00AM - 12:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM this event is free More
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                        • History of Women and Gender SeminarWomen, Gender, and Sexuality in the High School U.S. History Curric...
                          History of Women and Gender SeminarWomen, Gender, and Sexuality in the High School U.S. History Curriculum: A Conversation
                          5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Wendy Bergeron, Winnacunnet High School; Marlin Kann, Cambridge Rindge and Latin School; Miriam Morgenstern, History UnErased; Susan Zeiger, Primary Source Moderator: Victoria Cain, Northeastern University Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                          Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
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                          • Public Program, Author TalkLexington & Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
                            Public Program, Author TalkLexington & Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
                            6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. George C. Daughan There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). registration required More
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                                  • Public ProgramThis Land is Your Land Series: Public Land
                                    Public ProgramThis Land is Your Land Series: Public Land
                                    6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. This program is supported by the Barr Foundation There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). registration required More
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                                            Exhibition Yankees in the West this event is free 6 October 2017 to 6 April 2018 Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Yankees in the West

                                            For generations Americans have been fascinated with the American west. Depictions of the western landscape flooded New England in the mid19th century, spurring a stream of western tourism. Yankees in the West draws from the Society's collections of letters, diaries, photographs, drawings, and artifacts to explore the ways New Englanders experienced the trans-Mississippi west in the late19th and early 20th centuries.

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                                            Early American History Seminar Terror Twice Told: Popular Conventions, Political Violence, and the Coming of the Constitutional Crisis, 1780-1787 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                            Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                            3 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Brendan McConville, Boston University Comment: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut

                                            As the revolutionary war ended, members of committees, conventions and other extraordinary revolutionary institutions continued to operate as independent political actors. Between 1781 and at least 1786, committeemen and conventioneers launched forceful, violent efforts to reengineer American society. Committee-directed mobs expelled “tories” from many communities, and committeemen and conventioneers used both local laws and contract theory to legitimate these expulsions. This paper argues that the wave of political violence after the American victory at Yorktown in 1781 ultimately reflected conflicts within the American political community over who could be an American, what institutions constituted “the people” in a republic, and the character and limits of the “the people’s” power to form self-governing institutions. These disputes played an important role in creating the 1787 constitutional crisis.

                                            To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                            Brown Bag Native Americans in the Antislavery Movement this event is free 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Natalie Joy, Northern Illinois University

                                            This presentation explores Native American participation in the American antislavery movement from the 1830s to the 1860s. In addition to attending meetings, Indians signed petitions, donated money, organized fundraising fairs, held positions in antislavery societies, and assisted fugitive slaves. Most significantly, they influenced abolitionist thought on a number of issues.

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                                            Public Program This Land is Your Land Series: Private Land registration required 4 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 This program is supported by the Barr Foundation

                                            Some of the early efforts to preserve open space for the physical and spiritual benefits offered by access to nature came from private organizations. Mount Auburn Cemetery was the first large-scale designed landscape open to the public in North America and as such began the rural cemetery movement that later led to public parks. In 1853 the Laurel Hill Association was founded in Stockbridge, inspiring a national Village Improvement Society movement. Later generations have benefited from the first private, statewide conservation and preservation organization, The Trustees of Reservations. Historic New England has saved traditional farms and Mass Audubon and other private organizations preserve and manage open space across the state. How common is this preservation by private organizations? How sustainable is this concept for future generations?

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                                            Environmental History Seminar The Ice Trade: Frederic Tudor’s “Slippery Speculation” Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                            Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                            10 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Andrew Robichaud, Boston University Comment: David Spanagel, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

                                            This paper reexamines the emergence and development of the ice trade in Boston and North America, described in 1806 by the Boston Gazette as a “slippery speculation.” What can the ice trade tell us about environmental, economic, political, and spatial change in nineteenth-century Boston and North America?

                                            To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                            Building Closed Patriot's Day 16 April 2018.Monday, all day

                                            The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Patriot's Day. 

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                                            History of Women and Gender Seminar Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the High School U.S. History Curriculum: A Conversation Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                            Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                            17 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Fay House, Radcliffe Institute Wendy Bergeron, Winnacunnet High School; Marlin Kann, Cambridge Rindge and Latin School; Miriam Morgenstern, History UnErased; Susan Zeiger, Primary Source Moderator: Victoria Cain, Northeastern University

                                            All high school students in the United States study American history, and many of them seek mastery in the subject, which is the second most popular at the Advanced Placement level. Yet relatively few female actors appear in high school textbooks, and graduates arrive on college campuses with widely varying levels of exposure to the history of women, gender, and sexuality in America, especially prior to the 1990s. This panel discussion, featuring university faculty, secondary educators, and activist curriculum specialists, aims to seed an ongoing discussion between high school and post-secondary instructors of American history about gendering the U.S. History curriculum. What topics in women’s and gender history and in the history of sexuality get covered when, where, and how? How can college- and university-based scholars do more to connect their work with high school classrooms? How are secondary educators—and their students—advancing and reshaping the field?

                                            This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 10 PDPs with the completion of a lesson plan.

                                            To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                            Public Program, Author Talk Lexington & Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World registration required 19 April 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. George C. Daughan There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

                                            The mounting political tensions that ignited the battles of Lexington and Concord are critical to the narrative of the American Revolution. However, the economic forces that propelled these iconic battles are another vital part of this history. When Benjamin Franklin wrote home describing the living conditions in Britain and Ireland, his country men were appalled. Could the Crown’s motive be to reduce the prosperous American colonies to such serfdom? This threat inspired the vast turnout of Patriot militiamen that so shocked the British and led the colonists to victory in the first armed conflictsof the War of Independence.

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                                            Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Creepy Crawling in Los Angeles: The Manson Family and Cultural Mixing as Apocalypse Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                            Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                            24 April 2018.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jeffrey Melnick, UMass-Boston Comment: Gretchen Heefner, Northeastern University

                                            Charles Manson made national news in 1969 when several “Family” members were arrested for murder, but by then he was well-established in Los Angeles. This paper explores the cultural fluidity that allowed Los Angeles’s hip aristocracy to mingle with marginal figures like Manson, but also the backlash which turned the Manson Family into a warning for the dangers of migration and the promiscuous cultural mixing that could follow.

                                            To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

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                                            Public Program This Land is Your Land Series: Public Land registration required 25 April 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. This program is supported by the Barr Foundation There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

                                            Massachusetts has undertaken large scale preservation of open space by government entities. The Boston Public Garden, the Emerald Necklace, the first American public beach in Revere, the banks of the Charles River, and a network of state forests were all significant contributions to keeping open land available to the public. Were these projects pioneering? Have they shaped national discussions? Are similar projects possible today or will projects like the Community Preservation Act offer equivalent impacts?

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